Rehab for College Students

Rehab for College Students

Transitioning into college is a significant life milestone. A student’s life in college or university helps shape the person they become in the future. Going to college usually means separation from home and independence. But living in a new social environment can challenge a person’s values and beliefs.

University and college students in the U.S. face immense pressure to succeed and build a career. Most students get concerned about their academics and experience the stress of meeting new people and trying new things. Striking a balance between all the new events can be difficult, and some students turn to drinking or drug use as a coping mechanism.

Keep reading to find about the reasons why students turn to unhealthy drinking and drug use, and the most effective ways of getting help!

Get Help with Drinking and Drugs on Campus

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), over a third of all American full-time college students between 18 and 22 binge drink regularly. The unique circumstances of college students make it necessary for customized addiction treatment programs tailored to meet their needs.

Substance use is among the most severe public health issues for the young American population, causing adverse health and socio-economic impacts for adolescents and their families.

Read on for more info about rehab for college students, and to get help if you are struggling while in college, or have a loved one that might be!

Drug and Alcohol Abuse in College Students

Although some college students abstain from use, most are of legal drinking age and have more independence on campus. This increases the need to set personal goals and boundaries. You might want to unwind from the school week with a pint with your pals to help you relax in social situations. But for many students, the burden of expectations from their families, educators, peers, society, and even themselves only grows heavier during their time at university.

Over 6 million young adults have substance use disorders (SUD). Under competing pressures, college students must learn to live a new lifestyle around factors that can predispose them to college drug abuse. Alcoholic beverages are readily available on college campuses, and students sometimes use drugs to relieve stress or enhance performance. Prolonged drug use may cause the students to develop substance use disorders or alcohol addiction.

One in every five American adults experiences mental health disorders annually. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), 75% of mental health illnesses develop by 24 years. Students may experience symptoms of conditions like depression, bipolar disorder, or PTSD for the first time in college. Survivors of traumatic events like sexual assault are at a high risk of a mental illness diagnosis. Students with mental illness may turn to alcohol and drug use to cope with the symptoms.

Commonly Abused Drugs in College

Commonly Abused Drugs in College

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) explains that drinking alcohol is a ritual that students consider an essential part of college or university life. Although alcohol is the most commonly abused drug by young adults, most students also use:

 

  • Marijuana
  • Ecstasy, LSD, and other psychedelics
  • Study drugs and stimulants such as Adderall
  • Cocaine
  • Prescription painkillers
  • Opioids
  • Prescription or opiate painkiller abuse can cause injury, overdose, and death

Marijuana

Also called marijuana or weed, cannabis is among the most popular drugs on U.S. college campuses. Most marijuana users smoke it, while others incorporate the drug into edibles, like baked products and confectionery. Marijuana’s psychoactive and hallucinogenic effects vary by strain.

Nearly half the college student population reported using marijuana in 2018. Marijuana may not be as harmful as other illicit drugs, but occasional use might become problematic and aggravate a student’s anxiety. Addiction can develop with prolonged usage of this substance. If you suffer from a marijuana use disorder, call us at +1 (855) 728-4363 for confidential advice on getting help.

Cocaine

Despite cocaine’s popularity as a party drug on many universities and campuses, its stimulating effects are not worth the risks involved in using the drug. To feel more energized or productive, some young adults may opt to snort, inject, or inhale the white powdery substance. Others smoke it as crack cocaine.

Cocaine is lethal on its own, but when combined with other drugs commonly found on college campuses, such as Adderall or marijuana, it becomes exceedingly dangerous. Using cocaine has severe effects on mental and physical health. Given these potential long-term effects, helping someone addicted to cocaine could save their life.

“Study Drugs” and Prescription Stimulants

College students often use prescription stimulants like amphetamines to improve focus. Doctors prescribe drugs like Adderall and Ritalin to treat hyperactive issues, major depressive episodes, and irregular sleeping patterns. Some students use these drugs without a prescription as study aids, even though doing so is illegal and dangerous.

College students widely use stimulant tablets because of their ability to increase wakefulness and attentiveness momentarily. Examples of other study drugs include Modafinil and Concerta. Stimulant use disorders that involve study drugs require professional addiction treatment. Call Pathfinders for more information on study drug misuse.

Benzodiazepines

Also known as “benzos,” benzodiazepines are prescription drugs commonly used to treat anxiety, panic disorders, and seizures. Addiction professionals also prescribe these drugs to relax muscles and promote sleep. They are among the most often prescribed medications in the United States, and college students frequently abuse them for their sedative properties. Examples of benzodiazepines are:

 

  • Xanax
  • Valium
  • Ativan
  • Klonopin

 

Benzodiazepines like Xanax are highly addictive and have some of the most dangerous and life-threatening withdrawal symptoms of any form of drug.

The Effects of Drug Abuse on College Students

Substance misuse can have severe implications for college students that extend beyond their academic careers. The following are some of the short- and long-term consequences of drug and alcohol use disorder in college students:

  1. Poor academic performance: Substance misuse can result in reduced study time, missing class, and a lower GPA. Drug use can also lead to falling behind on assignments, dropping out, or being expelled.
  2. Risky behaviors: Drug abuse also leads to risky behaviors like driving under the influence, being involved in an alcohol-related sexual assault, getting into fights, indulging in dangerous sexual practices, and date rape.
  3. Health issues: Substance abuse can cause many physical health problems, including hangovers, sickness, and effects on your immune system.
  4. Social ramifications: Substance abuse can cause losing friends and vital relationships. You may become socially isolated if you spend a lot of time drinking or using drugs.

What are the Warning Signs of Substance Abuse?

Substance Abuse

Signs and symptoms of drug abuse among college students may include the following:

  • Poor personal hygiene
  • A decline in grades and absenteeism  from school
  • Needing drugs or alcohol to unwind or enjoy oneself
  • Avoiding social interactions
  • Mood changes
  • People stop engaging in activities they used to enjoy
  • Falsely denying the usage of drugs or alcohol
  • Spending a lot of time using and recovering from the effects of drugs
  • Physical and mental illness
  • Withdrawal symptoms such as headaches and cravings
  • Using drugs or alcohol while knowing the risks
  • Legal issues like arrests
  • Substance abuse in potentially dangerous settings like while driving
  • Engaging in potentially harmful activities while under the influence of alcohol or drugs

 

Talking about a drug abuse problem might be a difficult conversation to have with someone who doesn’t believe they do. This conversation is more beneficial in the presence of someone trustworthy, like a professor or counselor.

When talking to a friend or loved one, let them know you’re worried about their health, happiness, and academic progress. If they are unwilling to listen, don’t criticize or blame them; instead, back off and try again later.

It is best to keep the conversation specific and inform them of scenarios you deem detrimental to their health. You don’t have to say everything all at once, but you might want to offer them a list of valuable resources and then follow up with them periodically.

Rehab treatment can help prevent the adverse effects of substance use on your health, academic career, and overall well-being, and there are various ways to get help. These include consulting with the campus health center, speaking with a counselor at your campus counseling center, or checking into a hospital or rehab center.

Treating Addiction in College Students

Some young adults in higher education refuse treatment for substance abuse because they don’t believe they have a problem. Students often avoid discussing therapy because of the stigma associated with drug abuse.

Accepting to get addiction treatment shows that you care about your health and your future. According to research, the sooner someone seeks addiction treatment, the more likely they will recover fully. Most rehabilitation centers cater to the needs of students without interfering with their studies.

Detoxification

Detoxification is often the first step in the rehabilitation process after assessment. During detox, substances like alcohol and narcotics are eliminated from the body. In this period, many addicts suffer from unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Many of these symptoms are avoidable through medical detox.

Since quitting cold turkey can be fatal, medically supervised detox is essential when detoxing from benzodiazepines or alcohol. The average withdrawal periods for various drugs include:

  • Cannabis        – 2 weeks or more
  • Alcohol           – 5 to 7 days
  • Tobacco          – 2 days to 2 weeks
  • Cocaine          – 2 to3 days
  • Opioids           – 1 to 4 weeks
  • Benzos            – 10 to 14 days

 

Detox from opioid use disorders varies widely depending on the length of use and method of delivery. Opioid detox patients experience unpleasant withdrawal symptoms such as anxiety, depression, and insomnia. But they lose tolerance to opioids within days of abstinence.

Overdosing is a potential risk during relapse, which is, unfortunately, rather often. Relapse is avoidable with the help of medication in a Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) program. Those with severe opioid addiction may benefit from starting on MAT for an extended time before attempting to wean themselves off the drugs.

Some recovering addicts think that withdrawal is the most challenging aspect of the process, while others say overcoming cravings after detox is the most difficult.

Behavioral Treatment

Mental health therapy and counseling help treat psychological and behavioral challenges that may have contributed to addiction. Counselors can assist college students in learning how to cope with drug urges and the challenges that might lead to drug usage.

Anxiety

Many college students have a co-occurring disorder that has led to drug use. Treating underlying mental health issues is critical to a successful addiction recovery process.

Common co-occurring disorders that students confront include:

  • Depressive disorders.
  • Eating disorders.
  • Anxiety.
  • Bipolar disorder.

 

Most higher learning institutions have on-campus mental health counselors. These counselors assist pupils in coping while keeping confidentiality. At Pathfinders, our comprehensive dual diagnosis treatment programs handle co-occurring mental health problems.

Outpatient Rehab vs. Inpatient Rehab

College students who are addicted to drugs usually require the assistance of a drug rehab facility to recover. Many inpatient and outpatient addiction treatment centers can help college students achieve sobriety without interfering with their studies.

Inpatient treatment centers provide a distraction-free environment away from campus temptations. College students in rehabilitation improve their grades and overall health. Many inpatient rehab facilities also cater to college students by being close enough to campus for residents to attend class during the day.

For a college student with milder addiction, outpatient rehab is a suitable treatment option. These outpatient centers offer withdrawal medication and counseling while not interfering with the student’s daily routine. Mental health counselors and support groups can help break down addictions psychologically.

How Long Does Rehab Take?

The length and intensity of rehabilitation can change depending on whether you choose inpatient or outpatient care. If you are worried about attending rehab for college students because you don’t want your grades to suffer or you don’t want to fall behind in your education program, consider what will happen if you don’t get help.

If you have to leave school for substance abuse treatment, various mental health resources can help you during and after the process. They include counseling programs, medical leaves of absence, or transition plans that involve modified programs of study. It takes courage to get help for a substance use disorder before your life completely unravels, but it’s admirable that you’re ready to do so.

The average time spent in inpatient treatment is between three weeks and ninety days, while some programs may need a longer commitment. If you choose outpatient care, you may be able to keep up with your daytime classes while receiving therapy in the evenings. Look for a rehab center, such as our programs at Pathfinders, that will work with you to identify the best treatment alternatives for your specific situation.

Rehab can seem daunting or intimidating, but if you don’t want your family or friends to know, no one has to. Taking charge of your life can set you up for a more peaceful, prosperous, and successful tomorrow.

Maintaining Sobriety as an Undergraduate

Rehab for College Students

The next step after finishing addiction treatment is to remain sober while pursuing higher education. Some college rehab programs include sobriety and behavioral contracts to encourage sobriety. The students have to agree to things like going to 12-step meetings, staying away from drugs and alcohol, not engaging in risky behavior, and keeping up with their schoolwork.

Some educational institutions even provide rehabilitation housing for students who are experiencing substance abuse issues. Students in recovery from addiction may benefit from additional peer support from campus-sponsored events.

After finishing a college student rehabilitation program, the next step is to receive aftercare support. This is of utmost importance for those in recovery while attending college. Most universities provide their students access to outpatient treatment and recovery support groups. Getting sober takes effort, but it’s feasible to maintain that effort for the rest of your life.

Get Help Now and Keep Pursuing Your Degree

Pathfinders Recovery Centers are addiction and dual diagnosis treatment centers that offer cutting-edge drug addiction treatment services. If you are battling substance use, connect with us for a solid foundation for starting the journey to recovery.

Reach out now to our Admissions team and discuss the process of Admission and how we can best help you to get sober and get to the podium to celebrate your graduation!

How to Pay for Rehab

How to Pay for Rehab

Even though our country extends options for insurance to every man, woman, and child who resides here, thousands of people struggle daily to figure out how they’ll pay for rehab. Many of them either haven’t taken the time to sign up for insurance or lack the resources or know-how to make it happen.

These things happen, especially when you have a substance abuse habit that remains your number one priority. The sad part is the fact that most of these people are a phone call away from earning the opportunity to receive coverage for rehab, and most of them are completely unaware.

The following article provides information regarding the actual rehab cost, with different financing options. Hopefully, by the conclusion, you’ll be armed with more resources to help yourself or someone else entering treatment.

How Much Does Rehab Cost?

Even though drug and alcohol addiction treatment costs vary by program, inpatient rehab facilities will likely cost between $30,000 and $50,000 for a 30-day program, and outpatient rehab facilities will cost from $250 to $500 per session. Medically assisted detox ranges anywhere from $700 to $1,200 or more per day.

Most addiction treatment centers offer basic rooms. These accommodations often have a comfortable bed, a bathroom, and space for personal items. The cost of a non-shared room may be a bit higher. Swimming pools and on-site gyms are found in some locations, and certain facilities might even allow visits from children or the admittance of pets.

Even if you have insurance, your provider may not cover the specific rehab you’re looking to attend. They might only pay a portion, or they could possibly not over any of your stays, depending on the type of insurance you have. Certain providers require anywhere you attend to be within their network of physicians and practitioners.

In these cases, you’ll be required to come up with a significant amount out of pocket. In the section below, we’ll discuss ways to get the funds together to cover the cost of rehab.

How to Pay for Rehab: Making It Work

When you’re scrambling to find a source for funding, things can get pretty stressful. Getting into treatment for substance abuse disorder as quickly as possible is critical for avoiding any further risk or damage done to the mind and body.

Depending on your resources and how hard you’re able to work, multiple options exist for getting the funds together. We’ll look at a few different options you have for accomplishing this goal.

Paying with Private Insurance Policies

Paying with Private Insurance Policies

Paying with private insurance companies can be an option, depending on if you have access to enroll. This option is one of the most difficult if you’re winging it or don’t have anyone to assist you, but it’s still possible to make it happen.

If you’re working, you could ask your employer if they offer a private insurance program for employees. Alternatively, assuming you have a source of income, you can always sign up for private insurance on your own.

However, many providers require that you’re a member for a certain amount of time before they cover any significant type of treatment or procedure.  Contacting a private insurance company that deals specifically with substance abuse treatment is always possible.

These providers typically only provide coverage for clients seeking substance abuse or behavioral health treatment. Generally, these organizations make it a point to secure insurance for their clients because of the urgent need to receive coverage for substance abuse treatment.

One final option regarding private insurance companies is to inquire about your parents’ or a family member’s insurance policy. Their provider may offer coverage if your family member/spouse/parent lists you as a dependent.

General Insurance for Rehab Guidelines

Your best bet for receiving coverage for treatment most likely lies in signing up for some form of Medicaid or using a provider from the ACA marketplace.

The Affordable Cares Act, signed into legislation during President Barack Obama’s term, allows every American to purchase affordable insurance through the ACA marketplace. The costs are broken down based on your income – so regardless of your financial status, there’s a plan to accommodate everybody.

Medicaid is available for individuals who have little to no source of income. Regardless of your situation, some type of insurance is available to relieve you of the monetary stress of paying for rehab.

With these plans in place, one of the only reasons you should have to cover a significant amount out of pocket is if you have the goal of attending a treatment program your insurance won’t cover. If you purchase a plan through the ACA market or have Medicaid, this would typically be an issue. Sometimes these insurance programs don’t cover services at a high cost, mainly if lower-priced alternatives exist.

Can I Use the ACA Marketplace for Rehab?

The ACA marketplace is a great place to obtain insurance for rehab. After the Affordable Cares Act was signed into legislation, President Obama required any insurance policy purchased through the ACA marketplace to provide alcohol and substance abuse treatment for its clients.

If you’ve exhausted all other private insurance options, relying on a provider through the ACA marketplace could be your best bet. There’s no guarantee regarding the specific provider you’ll receive, but you are guaranteed to obtain insurance coverage for rehab.

ACA Marketplace For Rehab

Are Medicare and Medicaid Used for Rehab?

As alternatives to the ACA marketplace, Medicaid and Medicare provide rehab options for customers. Medicaid even backdates their coverage, so if you paid out of pocket for anything in the months before signing up, they would potentially reimburse you for the costs.

Medicare can be a bit more complicated, as multiple types of insurance cover different things. If you’re familiar with Medicare, you’ve probably heard of terms like “Medicare Part A” or “Medicare Part B.” These different “parts” provide different levels of coverage, which can get confusing at times.

However, Medicare agents can help you obtain the specific coverage you’re looking for. These agents act as brokers between clients and different Medicare insurance providers and assist with enrollment to ensure the process is done correctly.

Cash Pay and Private Pay for Rehab Costs

Cash pay and private pay for rehab costs are potential options. However, this is probably one of the most challenging routes for obtaining coverage.

If you do have to go this route, it might be in your best interests to participate in outpatient services until you receive coverage. Outpatient rehab services are usually much lower in price than inpatient residencies, and most of the time, you can pay for single sessions during treatment.

This helps to avoid paying a significant portion upfront in the case of inpatient treatment. Generally, most organizations require the entire residency is covered pretreatment. However, some facilities do allow you to set up payment plans. You would need to contact someone from the rehab’s financial and billing department to inquire about setting up payment arrangements.

In addition to the options listed above, specific charities, non-profits, and local government offices provide grants and other assistance to cover the cost of substance abuse treatment.

How to Pay for Rehab: Sources of Help

Researching sources of help in your area will potentially offer alternative financial assistance options. Grants from charitable organizations sometimes provide a hand covering all or a portion of rehab.

Contacting offices at your local city hall or county administrator’s building could uncover promising alternatives. Because of the opioid epidemic, many cities and counties provide some assistance programs for residents who need treatment. In addition, accessible rehab facilities exist for community members who cannot obtain funding sources for costlier forms of treatment.

Finding Affordable Rehab Made Easy

If you’ve researched all the options listed above and found little to no relief, certain substance abuse treatment programs have some affordable care programs for clients in distress. Pathfinders Recovery works with thousands of clients yearly, and not all are in the best financial situation.

Because of a wide range of options for treatment, rehabs like Pathfinders can provide an assortment of options to fit almost any budget. Some even offer payment plans similar to the ones we mentioned earlier in the article.

A Foundation for Sobriety You Can Afford

Anyone suffering from substance abuse challenges should have access to some form of treatment. Arriving at the point of understanding you need help is a big step and capitalizing on this realization in the shortest amount of time possible is critical.

Contact a member of the Pathfinders Recovery Centers staff today to learn more about our program s and the types of financing options we have for covering the cost of treatment.

Can You Force Someone into Rehab?

Force Someone into Rehab

Rehab is often thought of as a voluntary activity, but that doesn’t mean that it has to be voluntary. Sometimes the court or other legal representatives may consider forcing someone to go to rehab because it’s what’s best for them. The person sentenced to rehab this way might not have believed it otherwise.

In other states, it’s illegal for someone to send someone to recovery without their consent. Depending on the locale, you might not be able to legally put someone into rehab who doesn’t want to go. The real question shouldn’t be if you could force someone into rehab, but rather if you should.

In some cases, a person might become self-destructive because of their addiction. They may not even see that as a problem and won’t accept that they are addicted. Putting someone in rehab forcibly should be a last resort, but even so, you should be aware of whether it’s legal to do so.

What Are Requirements for Arizona Drug Court?

In Arizona, a person can enter Drug Court if the state deems that they’ve met the requisite requirements. With Drug Court, a person is mandated to attend status hearings so the state can be updated on their progress. The attendee will have to sign a contract that outlines what goals they agree to meet during their recovery at each court date. The program runs for one year, and a person must complete all the goals set forth by the court to “graduate” the program. To be eligible for Arizona Drug Court, a person must have the following:

  • Drug-related felonies that are eligible for probation within the previous two years
  • Has a score of medium-high or high risk on the OST/FROST and spiked more than 67% on the drug domain
  • Has a history of substance abuse that’s severe to moderate
  • Must reside within the supervision area for the Drug Court

This state-mandated treatment is involuntary, and a person committed needs to complete it before being discharged.

How Effective Is Court Mandated Treatment?

Force Someone into Rehab

One of the most common questions is whether court-mandated or involuntary treatment is effective. The research on this topic is limited, and there’s not much to go on. Statistics show us that almost one-third of all patients admitted to rehab programs in 2013-2014 was through involuntary methods such as court-mandated rehab.

Based on the number of people who recovered because of the court-mandated rehab, it seems that the process does work. Individuals who are coerced into rehab programs tend to do better and stay longer, completing their course of treatment. While the data is still uncertain, the results are promising based on what we know.

What Are Involuntary Commitment Laws in Arizona?

Forcing someone into rehab through involuntary commitment usually means relying on the law to do so. If the person you intend to commit to rehab is a minor, the court might not be willing to do so. They will commit a minor if there is enough evidence that the person has a substance use disorder and may have attempted to harm themselves in the past. The same goes for a non-minor, although the court is more willing to look at involuntary commitment in those cases.

One of the most compelling arguments for involuntary commitment is the inability to function. If a person is so addicted to a substance that they can’t take care of themselves, the court is likely to force them into rehab. The person will be appointed a lawyer to argue their case at a hearing. However, in many cases, they may also think that the person may need to go to rehab.

Dual Diagnosis Treatment for Mental Health Disorders

Dual diagnosis treatment

Dual diagnosis occurs when a person has both a substance use disorder and a mental health disorder. In the past, these disorders weren’t treated together, but it was found that a dual diagnosis treatment must be used for proper recovery from addiction to occur. When a person is admitted to a rehab center, they will have to go through an evaluation that helps the facility determine whether they are a candidate for dual diagnosis or not.

Dual diagnosis combines treatments to give the most effective outcome for individuals who have both a mental health disorder like anxiety or depression and substance use disorder. Sometimes, the mental health condition leads to addiction.

Who Pays For Court Ordered Rehab?

In most cases of court-ordered rehab, the weight of payment rests on the shoulders of the plaintiff. It’s a common misunderstanding that the state will pay for involuntary commitment to a rehab center. The state is never responsible for paying for a plaintiff’s rehab.

If it’s not the state that brought the request for commitment, the circumstances of payment change. In these cases, the person who put the person forward to be committed involuntarily is responsible for paying for their treatment. This rule only applies in states that have passed “Casey’s Law” (Ohio and Kentucky). Indiana has “Jennifer’s Act,” which performs the same function.

What Are Some Ways To Convince Someone To Go To Rehab?

Force Someone into Rehab

Convincing someone to go to rehab might be quite hard. However, doing so ensures that they are also on board with overcoming their condition. Compelling someone to go to rehab requires them to admit they have a problem and wanting to get help for it. In some cases, families might try intervention to get their loved ones aware of the hurt that their addiction may be causing others within the family. Professional interventions may not work, however.

When someone is dealing with addiction, their brain may not be in the proper frame to make the right decision. As a result, they might not agree to enter rehab, leaving you with few options aside from an involuntary commitment to a rehab facility.

Establishing Motivation for Sobriety in Court Ordered Rehab

The most crucial part of overcoming addiction is setting up a motivation for sobriety. Why should a person want to get sober when they enjoy using the drug? Usually, the reason for sobriety for voluntary patients is the need to recover their lives. Addiction can cause severe economic and social damage to a person who has to work through it.

Many of these people remember life before their addiction and want to get back to that point. Their urges challenge this motivation, but a rehab facility can give them the tools to deal with it.

Court Ordered Rehab

For involuntary addiction, the approach is somewhat different. A person who is checked into a rehab center against their will might not want anything to do with the process. However, these cases can be resolved by helping the person understand the point of view of others.

When a person starts to accept that they have a problem and decide to change their circumstances, rehab can help them overcome their addiction. While a person might enter rehab being against recovery, they’re more likely to want to finish the treatment once they realize the benefits it offers them in the real world.

Make Treatment Attractive: Presenting Pathfinders Recovery

To convince a reluctant person, it helps to make treatment attractive. At Pathfinders Recovery, that’s what our staff always aim to do. We provide amenities and therapy for all of our clients that cater to their specific needs.

Our team is personable and approachable, making it easier to discuss addiction and come to terms with it. If you have a loved one that needs that special attention and care, give us a call today. We’re more than glad to facilitate you and help your loved ones get the care they need.

Long-Term Effects of Heroin

LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF HEROIN

Heroin Use Disorder Definition

Opioid or heroin use disorder is a chronic, lifelong disorder. Heroin use disorder has serious potential consequences, including a history of relapse, disability, and even death. In 2020, over 92,000 Americans died due to drug overdoses.

This was almost a 30% increase from the previous year. While heroin overdose rates have decreased slightly in the years since there was a seven-fold increase in deaths involving heroin from 2002 to 2017. Heroin use disorders remain a significant public health crisis.

What is Long-Term Heroin Use?

Since there are currently no approved medical uses for heroin, any amount or method of use constitutes abuse. But what is the timeframe that we consider short-term heroin abuse, as opposed to long-term heroin abuse, which is more likely to lead to heroin use disorders?

For prescription medications, many experts define short-term use as covering roughly one month. Long-term use may then be anything over one month and averages approximately three months or more.

But again, the rules change when we are talking about an illicit drug rather than a prescription medication. Heroin is one of the most addictive drugs available today. And it has become increasingly common for dealers to lace heroin with fentanyl, making it even more dangerous.

Effects of Long-Term Opiate Intake

Long-term opiate ingestion can cause a wide range of side effects. These side effects may be physical, mental, or emotional, with most users experiencing some combination of all three. Individual factors can alter your experience with heroin, including:

  • The frequency of heroin abuse.
  • The method of heroin abuse.
  • Other substances that are present in the body.
  • Your overall physical and mental health.

For most, changes in thought patterns, drug cravings, relapses, and withdrawal symptoms are some of the most noticeable early side effects.

Physical Effects of Chronic Heroin Use

Long-Term Effects of Heroin

Many of the effects of heroin use disorder are more psychological than physical. However, there are still many potential physical side effects of chronic heroin use that users should be aware of. Some of the most common include:

  • Constipation
  • Depressed respiration
  • Pneumonia and other lung complications
  • Damaged nasal tissue for those who repeatedly snort heroin
  • Collapsed or scarred veins and bacterial infections for those who inject heroin

As we mentioned earlier in the article, your side effects may vary depending on the severity of your addiction and the state of your overall health, among other factors.

Psychological Changes Made by Heroin

Repeated heroin use changes the physical structure and physiology of the brain. These changes create long-term imbalances in our hormonal and neuronal systems, and these imbalances are not easy to reverse.

In long-term heroin use, one of the largest psychological concerns is white matter damage in the brain. White matter damage can impair our decision-making skills, behavior regulation abilities, and stress responses.

A lack of control over these emotional processes can leave us feeling trapped and helpless. We can help you end the cycle of abuse and regain control.

Heroin Withdrawal Symptoms

Certain opiates, including heroin, produce extreme degrees of tolerance and physical dependence. When our bodies adapt to the presence of a drug, we become physically dependent on it, and withdrawal symptoms occur if we abruptly reduce or stop using it.

Heroin withdrawal symptoms may start in as short as a few hours after the last dose. Some of the most common heroin withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Insomnia and restlessness.
  • Bone and muscle pain.
  • Vomiting and diarrhea.
  • Involuntary leg movements.
  • Cold flashes and goosebumps.

Through any method, heroin is extremely addictive. And heroin use disorder leads users to prioritize the drug over all else in their life, despite any negative consequences this may cause.

Risks of Fentanyl and Heroin Overdose

With the rate of fatal heroin overdoses landing in the thousands, this opioid remains a pressing concern. And there are several activities or additions that may make a heroin overdose more likely. For now, we will focus on the risks of fentanyl and heroin overdose.

One of the most pressing problems in the heroin crisis is that it is frequently laced with fentanyl without the user’s knowledge. Fentanyl is another addictive and dangerous opioid, which is approximately 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine.

We can’t always control what distributors put in the drugs that they sell on the streets. And we can’t always control how our bodies react to these substances.  But we can control what we put into our bodies, even when it feels like we have no control at all.

Establishing Recovery That Will Last

Establishing recovery that will last starts with being honest with yourself. Heroin use disorder will not go away on its own. And it will likely not get better without treatment. This is not something that you have to face alone. Our dedicated professionals are here to help.

Heroin can present several overwhelming, uncomfortable, and even dangerous withdrawal symptoms. These severe withdrawal symptoms make it harder to detox at home. So, we recommend starting with medical detox.

Our suboxone and other medication-assisted options will help reduce or eliminate your withdrawal symptoms to aid the early sobriety stage. With these symptoms made more manageable, you become free to focus on your recovery.

From there, we recommend inpatient care, whether that means a traditional residential program or a long-term rehab program.

Inpatient vs. Outpatient Care for Heroin Addiction

Long-Term Effects of Heroin

Long-term drug abuse and addiction may require long-term inpatient care. While many traditional residential programs last an average of 30 days to three months, long-term rehab programs typically last longer than that.

Some stay for six months, while others remain for a year or more. If you start your recovery journey with a long-term program, you will spend your time here working toward a variety of recovery goals, including:

  • Altering damaging thought patterns and behaviors
  • Re-establishing the social skills lost during addiction
  • Building sober social networks and learning from social support groups
  • Developing healthy habits and coping mechanisms
  • Controlling negative emotions, like stress, anger, and depression, rather than submitting to them or using drugs to quiet them

During your time in long-term rehab, your days are spent with dedicated professionals and others on the same journey. We will evaluate your progress and needs as they change to ensure that you are still in the appropriate program.

Other Program Options for Heroin Addiction

While there are many different paths toward recovery, most start with residential care before transitioning into a more flexible program. Once your condition is more stable and you feel confident in your ability to maintain your sobriety at home, an outpatient program comes next.

Depending on your needs and mental health, this might mean a partial hospitalization program or an intensive outpatient program. We will work with you to determine which will best suit your needs when the time comes.

Overcoming Heroin Use Disorder at a Pathfinders Recovery Center

With conveniently located luxury facilities in both Arizona and Colorado, personalized care programs, and a full staff of dedicated professionals, the Pathfinders approach can make all the difference.

From detox through aftercare, we offer comprehensive programs to meet all of your recovery needs through each stage. Call us today at 866-275-0079 to learn more. Our confidential call line is always open, and our addiction counselors are here to help.

How Can You Get Sober From Drugs?

How to Sober Up From Drugs

If you are addicted to illegal or prescription substances, you must know how to sober up from drugs.

That is the only way to get your life back on track and avoid severe or even fatal problems.

Even if you are not addicted, you may need help getter sober.

Why? Non-addicted drug abuse can also have a serious, negative effect on your life.

Fortunately, there are plenty of things you can do to sober up from drugs.

Professionals ranging from your personal doctor to addiction specialists have the knowledge needed to help.

With their guidance, you can regain your sobriety no matter how badly addiction affects you.

How Can You Get Sober From Drugs in a Safe Way? - Pathfinders - A man is shooting up heroin while he thinks about how you can get sober from drugs in a safe environment.

Drug Use and Drug Problems

Tens of millions of Americans use potentially addictive prescription medications. Most of these people follow their prescriptions and avoid problems. However, more than 16 million Americans misuse their medications. You can misuse a medication by taking it too often or in excessive amounts. You also take part in prescription drug misuse if you do things such as:

  • Use someone else’s medication
  • Crush you medication or do other things to speed up its effects

You are at risk for serious problems if you take any amount of an addictive street drug. Marijuana is the most common of these substances, even though this drug is now often legal to use. Other widely used street drugs include cocaine, methamphetamine and heroin.

If you are addicted to a prescription drug or street drug, you have a substance use disorder, or SUD. There are subtypes of SUD for each major drug category. For example, people addicted to amphetamines, methamphetamine or cocaine have a stimulant use disorder.

You can also be diagnosed with an SUD if you are not addicted. How is this possible? Even non-addicted drug abuse can seriously interfere with your ability to function. For this reason, such life-altering abuse is included in the substance use disorder definition

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Can You Tell If You Need Help

Is it possible to tell when you need to start thinking about how to sober up from drugs? Very often, the answer to this question is yes. You should certainly think about your drug use if you misuse an addictive prescription medication. You should also be concerned if you are involved in the use of addictive street drugs.

When doctors diagnose an SUD, they look for signs of addiction such as:

  • Loss of control over how often you use drugs, or how much you take
  • Reduced sensitivity to the effects of any given amount of drugs
  • Withdrawal symptoms that start if you cut back on drugs or stop taking them
  • A lifestyle built around drug use or related activities
  • Not being able to quit taking drugs after multiple attempts to break free

Signs of serious drug abuse include:

  • Going through social or relationship problems as a result of your drug use
  • Using drugs multiple times while doing something dangerous like driving
  • Taking enough drugs to be unable to keep up with your major obligations

Learn More About Drug Rehab at Pathfinders — Call Today

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How to Sober Up From Drugs: First Steps

If you are wondering how to sober up from drugs, a common first step is talking to your personal physician. Today, many of these primary doctors have been trained to give drug screenings. Screenings serve several main purposes, including:

  • Assessing your level and pattern of drug use
  • Helping to determine whether you have an SUD
  • Determining how bad your symptoms are if an SUD is present
  • Helping your doctor guide you to the right resources for treatment

If you do not already have an SUD, you doctor may give you a brief intervention. That is the term for a short educational session about the dangers of your drug misuse. This session is designed to help you change and avoid developing diagnosable problems.

24-Hour Drug Rehab Hotline – Get Help Now

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How to Sober Up From Drugs: Drug Detox

If you have an SUD, you may need to enroll in drug detox, or detoxification, in order to get sober. Why? Detox provides a secure environment for people affected by addiction to stop using drugs. It also provides the medical expertise needed to safely make it through drug withdrawal.

What happens during detox? That depends on the drug or medication you are addicted to. There are specific detoxification options for substances such as:

  • A stimulant such as methamphetamine or cocaine
  • An opioid medication or street drug
  • An addictive tranquilizer or sedative

Everyone enrolled in a detox program receives care designed to keep them as healthy as possible. Some people also receive medication while going through the detox process.

How Can You Get Sober From Drugs in a Safe Way? - Pathfinders - An addiction therapist is comforting a patient who is looking for how you can get sober from drugs in a medical detox.

How to Sober Up From Drugs: Active Treatment

Completion of detox will leave you drug-free. However, this initial sobriety is not enough. To have a realistic chance at lasting sobriety, you must continue on to active drug rehab. Rehab helps you stay sober while you are still enrolled in treatment. It also teaches you techniques to remain sober once treatment comes to an end. Medication may be used as part of your rehab plan. Even if you do not receive medication, you will get crucial help from therapy or counseling.

What kinds of therapy will help you learn how to get sober from drugs and stay sober? Many options are available, including:

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
  • Family Behavior Therapy
  • Community Reinforcement
  • Contingency Management
  • 12-Step Facilitation

Your treatment team will match your therapy to your particular form of SUD.

 

Joining a Mutual Self-Help Group

It is common to join a mutual self-help group while still enrolled in rehab. In fact, the purpose of 12-step facilitation is to prepare you to join this kind of group. Self-help groups are beneficial because they allow you to establish peer relationships with others in recovery. These relationships provide extensive support for your long-term commitment to sobriety.

 

How To Sober Up From Drugs: Continuing Care or Aftercare

In detox and active treatment, you learn how to sober up from drugs. But this is not the end of your battle. You must also take appropriate steps to remain sober. A mutual self-help group will be a big plus. However, experts also recommend some form of continuing care or aftercare. This is the name for a follow-up program that gives you continued access to professional treatment. Continuing care will help you cope with the ups and downs of everyday life without returning to drug use.

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Learn More About How To Sober Up From Drugs

Learning how to get sober from drugs can be a major turning point in your life. In contrast, if you do not learn how to do this, you may find yourself trapped in addiction’s powerful grip. If you suspect that your drug use has gotten out of hand, today is the day to get help. Together, your primary doctor and addiction specialists will help you recover from even severe drug-related problems.

Have questions about how to sober up from drugs? Just turn to the professionals at Pathfinders. Our experienced staff will help you sort out exactly what you need to do to get started. And if you need to enroll in a drug treatment program, Pathfinders is standing by. No matter what kind of substance you are addicted to, you will find what you need in our full range of treatment services.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: Key Substance Use and Mental Health Indicators in the United States – Results From the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health; Pages 15 and 20

https://www.campusdrugprevention.gov/sites/default/files/2019%20NSDUH.pdf

U.S. National Library of Medicine – MedlinePlus: Prescription Drug Misuse

https://medlineplus.gov/prescriptiondrugmisuse.html

American Psychiatric Association: What Is a Substance Use Disorder?

https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/addiction/what-is-addiction

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: A Guide to Substance Abuse Services for Primary Care Clinicians – Chapter 2: Screening for Substance Use Disorders

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64820/

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: A Guide to Substance Abuse Services for Primary Care Clinicians – Chapter 3: Brief Intervention

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64821/

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: Detoxification and Substance Abuse Treatment – Physical Detoxification Services for Withdrawal From Specific Substances

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64116/#A85631

National Institute on Drug Abuse: Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment – A Research-Based Guide (Third Edition); Pages 39 -65

https://www.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/podat_1.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64116/#A85631

Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment: Continuing Care – What We’ve Learned and Where We’re Going

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2670779/

Signs and Symptoms That You Need Rehab

What is Rehab?

The term rehab is used to refer to the many types of addiction programs available to people with a drug or alcohol problem.

These programs are designed to help people to stop using drugs and give them tools to get back on track to a happy, healthy life.

However, the path to recovery is different for every person.

Not every drug rehab or alcohol rehab program is right for everyone.

That is why it is important to learn about the different rehab options that are available.

This will help you to choose the program that is going to best fit your individual needs.

Staying Sober - A woman meets with her therapist over a video chat. Staying sober is more difficult with social distancing. Those in recovery need new ways to connect for support.
A woman meets with her therapist over a video chat.

Understanding Rehab

For every person dealing with an addiction, the first step in overcoming it is admitting that you have a problem.

This first step can be one of the most difficult parts of the recovery process.

Some people need a push from a friend or relative who is concerned about their health.

Others come to us directly because they realized that they have a problem and need to go to alcohol rehab or drug rehab.

No matter what led you to rehab, you need to understand the importance of getting sober for your health, as well as for the people in your life who love you.

You are unlikely to succeed in a treatment program if you cannot admit that you have a problem or are not committed to completing treatment.

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What is an Addiction?

Addiction is a chronic brain disease that causes a person to use alcohol or drugs even if they want to quit.

This is because these substances change the way that your brain works. When alcohol or drugs enter your system, they interact with your reward circuit.

This is the part of your brain that makes you feel happy and relaxed.

These substances then make your brain release a flood of the chemical dopamine, which creates a feeling of euphoria.

Your brain usually releases dopamine in small amounts when you do things that make you happy.

When substances make your brain get a lot of dopamine all at once, it makes it harder for your brain to release dopamine naturally.

This makes your brain crave drugs in order to make you feel good.

The longer you abuse alcohol or drugs, the harder it becomes for you to stop.

Learn More About Alcohol Rehab at Pathfinders Call Today

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How to Tell if You Have an Addiction

There are as many different side effects of addictions as there are addictive substances.

Some people who have been using drugs for a long time may show obvious signs of drug addiction.

Sometimes people are good at hiding their addiction. If you are the one that is abusing drugs or alcohol, it may be hard to see that you have a problem.

There are some signs that you can look for that indication that you or someone you know might have a drug problem.

These include:

  • Changing your friend groups, or avoiding friends entirely
  • A loss of interest in doing things that you used to enjoy
  • Not caring about your physical health or appearance
  • Being overly tired and sad
  • Eating more or less than usual
  • Being very energetic, talking fast, or saying things that do not make sense
  • Being in a bad mood or having angry outbursts
  • Sudden or extreme mood swings
  • Not being able to sleep, or sleeping too much
  • Missing important appointments
  • Having problems at work or at school
  • Having problems in personal or family relationships

If more than one or two of these situations apply to you, there is a chance that you have an addiction. Now is the time to start considering entering a rehab program so that you can get the help that you need.

Staying Sober - A woman does a video conference with her support group during social distancing. She is fighting to stay sober without the in person meetings she usually goes to.
A woman joins an AA meeting over a video conference during social distancing.

The Different Types of Rehab Programs

When it comes to both drug rehab and alcohol rehab, there are some similarities. Both of these types of rehab offer different levels of care to suit every addiction situation. These levels include:

  • Intensive Outpatient Treatment – This type of treatment program is best suited to clients with moderate addictions. It allows you to attend your recovery program at our facility on set days of the week and then return home for the night. It is a good option for people with work or family obligations that must be accommodated in order for them to attend treatment.
  • Partial Hospitalization Programs – PHP programs are best suited to clients who are also dealing with both addiction and mental health problems. It provides in-depth care that allows us to treat both issues at the same time. This process is the key to ensuring a lasting recovery when mental health problems are present.
  • Residential Treatment – This is one of the main types of rehab programs in the country today. It is best for people with serious addictions, or that have a dual diagnosis. Residential treatment provides the highest level of care because you must live at our facility to receive treatment. This allows us to give you round-the-clock care.
  • Long-Term Rehab – This type of rehab program is reserved for clients with the most serious levels of addiction. Whereas other programs usually last 30 to 90 days, long-term programs can last 6 months or more. For long-term drug or alcohol abusers, this program can be very helpful in preventing relapse.

What is Detox?

For many of our patients, detox is the first step on their recovery journey.

This professionally supervised process allows us to help you get all of the drugs or alcohol out of your system.

By first getting all of the substances out of your system, you will be better able to focus on your rehab plan.

Detox can be an uncomfortable experience. Alcohol withdrawal can cause anxiety, depression, fatigue, insomnia, mood swings, and more.

Drug withdrawal can cause the same issues along with more physical symptoms like nausea, vomiting, constipation, and muscle aches. By detoxing at our rehab facility, you are able to take advantage of our medical detox program.

This allows us to give you medications that make withdrawal symptoms easier to deal with and your detox process smoother.

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Behavioral Treatment Options

One of the most important parts of a rehab program is behavioral treatment or therapy. These treatments help you to find a lasting recovery from your addiction. Three of the most common include:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) which helps patients become aware of situations that trigger drug use. This allows you to avoid these situations or cope with them when they are unavoidable. It also focuses on teaching you ways to better deal with stress.
  • Family therapy is a great therapy option for clients whose addiction has led to issues in their family unit. It allows us to treat your family as a whole, while also rebuilding trust and strengthening the family bond.
  • Motivational interviewing (MI) helps a patient recognize how their behavior negatively affects their goals and give them tools to help change these habits.

When you enter care at our facility, we will work with you to decide which behavioral treatment is going to be right for you. Your sessions with a licensed counselor can take place in a one-on-one setting or in groups.

Many clients benefit from taking part in both individual and group sessions.

Being able to talk about your experiences with people who understand your situation helps you to build a community of support for your recovery.

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Getting the Help You Need at a Quality Rehab Center

At Pathfinders Recovery Center, we know exactly what it takes to get your life back from the difficulty of addiction.

Our premier addiction treatment centers are located in upscale areas throughout the Scottsdale, Arizona area.

Our luxury locations provide you with a comfortable and home-like atmosphere so that our clients feel safe and secure throughout their treatment program.

We help ensure your success by using only scientifically researched, cutting edge, and effective drug and alcohol addiction treatment programs.

We have over 25 years of experience in helping people with addictions and co-occurring disorders to overcome their addictions.

Many of our clients wonder whether they will be able to take advantage of their health insurance benefits to help cover their treatment.

That is why we accept most major insurances through our free insurance verification.

Simply give us a call and one of our addiction specialists can check to see how much of your treatment program will be covered by your insurance before you begin treatment.

You can trust us to communicate with your insurance provider to ensure that you receive every benefit that you are entitled to.

Whether you are looking for an alcohol rehab program or a drug rehab program, we are here to help.

Let us use our years of experience to help you get on the path to a meaningful, lasting recovery.

Contact us today to see the difference with how becoming sober can make your life change for the better.

Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies

Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies Pathfinders Recovery Center - A family all holding hands together, an analogy for exploring the link between family genetics and addiction tendencies.

We often hear of people having an addictive personality, or even that addiction runs in families.

It does bring up the question: “Why does one person get addicted to drugs or alcohol and another doesn’t? Is addiction linked to genetics?”

Is it possible to be predisposed to addiction? Is there a genetic link to addiction? If your parent or relative struggles with drug or alcohol addiction, do family genetics mean there’s no hope for you?

We’re going to answer all of these questions for you in this article.

Keep reading to learn about the genetic predisposition to addiction and general addiction tendencies based on your DNA.

What Is Addiction?

The American Society of Addiction Medicine states that addiction is a direct effect of the reward and motivational part of our brains being affected by an overwhelming need to “pursue reward or relief by substance use and behaviors.”

Alcohol addiction is one of the most common addictions in the United States.

An estimated 15.1 million people have an alcohol use disorder (AUD).

While most of us immediately think of alcoholism when we think of addiction, you can be addicted to many different substances and/or behaviors.

Some other examples of common addictions include:

  • Tobacco
  • Opioids
  • Sex
  • Cocaine
  • Benzos
  • Gambling

Any substance or behavior that affects your pleasure and/or reward system in the brain has the potential to become an addiction.

Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies Pathfinders - A husband and father is pouring another drink at the dining room table while his wife and daughter stand behind him depressed and watching him suffer with his alcoholism, as he wonders whether addiction is linked to genetics or not before seeking treatment.

Is Addiction a Disease?

Addiction is defined as a chronic disease of the brain that affects you mentally, physically, and socially.

Addiction directly disrupts normal brain function that impairs your judgment, learning, motivation, memory, and reward/relief systems.

Genetic Links to Addiction

As with other diseases, there are a number of factors that contribute to the development of the disease.

These factors include social settings, environmental factors, behavioral factors, and family genetics.

Let’s get a little bit more into the genetic predisposition associated with addiction.

“Addiction Genes”

There has been a scientific effort to uncover the specific genes that would result in addiction and drug abuse disorders.

This brings up two questions: “Why would there be genes for addiction anyway? If addiction is so harmful, shouldn’t those types of genes have already been eliminated from our population due to natural selection?”

Some argue that “addiction genes” may have helped our early ancestors to promote motivation and feelings of pleasure/reward for things like gathering food, procreating, etc. Once these genes are in place to reward us, it can affect how we behave with other things that give us pleasure, like drugs and alcohol.

There has been some success in finding particular “addiction genes.” As with most things concerning genetics, there is no one specific “addiction gene.” Instead, it’s a complex system of different genes and chemicals that can lead to addictive tendencies.

One common gene found in many drug addicts and alcoholics is a gene that affects dopamine receptors in the brain, specifically the DRD2 gene.

Dopamine is this “feel good” chemical in your brain. When you do something pleasurable (like drugs), your brain releases dopamine, which makes you feel good and makes you want to do more of that thing.

If your dopamine receptors are changed or more receptive to dopamine, it could make it easier to become addicted to drugs.

This is just one example of a potential “addiction gene” found by scientists. Hundreds of other genes can contribute to a predisposition to addiction. See some more examples here.

Twin Studies

Some of the most telling facts about addiction and genetics are genetics looking at family history and relatives with addiction.

Studies show that genetics amount to up to 50% of the likelihood that you’ll develop an addiction.

How do we know this? One study looked at over 1,000 sets of twins. Identical twins have the same genetic make-up. Therefore, if addiction were solely genetic, we would assume that if one twin had a substance abuse issue, the other twin would as well.

However, they found that if one twin had an addiction, the other twin was likely to have an addiction. But, they found that if one twin had an addiction, it didn’t mean the other twin had an addiction too.

In simple terms, this study found that genes have a large factor in addiction since the likelihood of twins having an addiction was high.

However, when one twin had an addiction, many of their twins with the same genes did not have an addiction.

This indicates that other factors that contribute to addiction besides genetics, even if addiction is linked to genetics.

Other studies support these findings.

This leads to the consensus that genetics amount to half of the predisposition/risk of developing an addiction.

Children of Parents Struggling with Addiction

When thinking about addiction’s genetic component, we have to look at the history of drug addiction in families.

One of the easiest ways to study the genetic links to addiction is to look at the children of those struggling with addiction.

These individuals struggling with substance abuse pass on their genes to their children. So, if there is a genetic link, logic tells us that the children of these individuals should also have substance abuse issues at one point or another. They should at least be at a much higher risk of addiction compared to children of those that do not have drug or alcohol issues.

And studies have found that this is, in fact, the case.

Children of those struggling with addiction are eight times more likely also to develop an addiction than children of individuals without substance abuse issues.

Another study showed that people who use drugs are more likely to have at least one parent that also uses drugs.

Is It Really Genetics? Digging Deeper

After everything we’ve just gone over, from the specific genetic findings to the family statistics, you might think it’s definite that genetics is the factor that causes addiction.

While it’s true addiction is linked to genetics, there are questions related to how much this means in terms of genetic predisposition.

However, we can’t ignore the behavioral and social aspects of family life that have nothing to do with genetics.

Children growing up with parents who normalize drug and alcohol use may simply use drugs because socially, it seemed normal. This doesn’t have to do with their genes; it has to do with their social environment.

While family statistics and studies show a link between genetics and addiction, it’s also important to remember that addiction is a complex disease with many factors, including social and behavioral factors.

Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies Pathfinders - A man struggling with substance abuse has decided to enter treatment after learning that addiction is linked to genetics and his parents struggled with addiction. He is taking part in an initial group therapy session to discuss his story and gain insight for healthy coping mechanisms to break free from addiction.

Other Factors that Can Lead to Addiction

Continuing with this idea, let’s look at some other factors that can contribute to addiction besides “addiction genes.”

Some of the most significant risk factors for addiction include:

  • Stress
  • Mental health disorders, such as depression, eating disorders, anxiety, etc.
  • Emotional/physical trauma
  • Peer pressure
  • Pop culture exposure
  • Easy access to drugs/alcohol
  • Social environment

Predisposition Is Not Certainty

This brings us to a very important point.

Just because you’re predisposed or have a higher risk of developing an addiction doesn’t mean you definitely will.

Your entire family could struggle with alcohol and drug abuse, and you could have multiple “addiction genes.”

But this does not mean addiction is inevitable for you.

If you feel you have many risk factors and can feel yourself potentially going down the wrong path, you can learn coping skills and enter treatment before an addiction develops.

Understanding your risks as a child or relative of someone who struggles with substance abuse can be a way to regulate your drug use. It can also help you understand you’re predisposed to addiction, which might motivate you to seek help before things get worse.

Each of these factors could lead to a higher risk of addiction, no matter what genes you have.

Addiction is complex and is the result of not one but many factors.

Genetics could be a big part of what leads someone down the addiction path, but it’s not the only factor. Although it is still essential to be aware that addiction is linked to genetics.

Family Genetics and Addiction: Bottom Line

You’ve probably heard that alcoholism is a family disease, and on some level, that’s true.

Addiction is linked to genetics and drug abuse disorders.

However, it’s also important to recognize that addiction is a complex disease that cannot be pinpointed on one factor or cause. It’s a myriad of social and biological triggers that come together to form the perfect storm known as addiction.

If you or a family member is struggling to stay sober, contact us today.

We can help those suffering from addiction overcome their reliance and live a healthier, more stable life.

 

Are You Searching For “Outpatient Rehabs Near Me?”

Substance Abuse Treatment Near Me Pathfinders Recovery Center - A young woman researched "substance abuse treatment near me" and is meeting with an addiction specialist to discuss her substance abuse issues.

Outpatient rehabs near me are sometimes the most effective choice for treating addiction.

Choosing to seek rehabilitation is difficult to make.

Having to determine what type of rehab to attend makes the decision even more complicated.

Alcohol and drug rehabilitation, whether inpatient or outpatient, is an effective and common form of treatment for addiction.

The competent and empathetic staff that have their best interests in mind surround the patient.

Read on for information about how to choose whether you attend inpatient or outpatient rehab.

Is Outpatient Rehab Right For You? Pathfinders Recovery Center - An individual who searched "outpatient rehabs near me," is meeting with an addiction specialist to determine if inpatient or outpatient rehab is the right choice for their level of substance abuse or addiction.

About Outpatient Rehabs Near Me

While both are effective options for substance abuse rehab depending on your specific level of addiction, inpatient and outpatient programs have essential differences.

Outpatient rehab allows patients to continue living at home as they attend therapy for addiction, while inpatient rehab involves patients remaining as residents at the rehab facility. Many patients prefer to attend outpatient rehab because of its added flexibility.

Still, the right choice of rehab depends on multiple factors, including the severity of the patient’s addiction, the familial and living situation of the patient, and the patient’s overall health. Understanding there are options to make your recovery as comfortable as possible is a significant factor in accepting the help you need.

Some outpatient rehabs near me offer various degrees of intensity in their treatments, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Although they can be quite helpful as an addiction aftercare initiative, low-intensity programs may not offer the necessary help that one who is struggling with addiction needs to lead a sober lifestyle.

While knowledge of addiction and education about recovery is beneficial to patients and their loved ones, severe addictions often require more intense treatment.

When considering outpatient rehab, remember this type of treatment may not be all-encompassing as other program options.

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Understanding Outpatient Rehab vs. Inpatient Rehab

Residential rehab is an ideal option for those that have been abusing alcohol or drugs for a long time, in large quantities, and on a frequent basis. Residential rehabilitation centers should maintain an up-to-date license to offer best practices for clients residing in inpatient rehab.

There is a community-centered feel with inpatient rehab, as patients live with clinical doctors and people who struggle with the same issues. For some patients, this aspect of the community draws them to inpatient rehab and helps them know recovery is possible. You can find more information on inpatient rehab from the NIDA here.

Licensed outpatient treatment centers offer outpatient rehab during the day, where patients come in a few times a week but do not live at the rehab facility. Treatment at outpatient rehab includes individual and group counseling.

Patients typically participate in behavioral treatments such as the following:

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT): This is where patients learn to recognize and cope with compulsive addiction situations.
  • Multidimensional Family Therapy: This therapy works with adolescents who attend therapy with their families to improve their family dynamic and address any substance abuse issues.
  • Motivational Interviewing: This therapy utilizes the motivation of patients for a drug-free life.
  • Motivational Incentives: This therapy uses positive reinforcement to encourage drug or alcohol abstinence.

Patients may continue outpatient rehab for prolonged amounts of time if necessary. Outpatient rehab often starts intensely, with patients attending therapy multiple days a week. Over time, sessions become shorter and less frequent if patients find that their recovery journey is going well and they are maintaining their sobriety.

Though outpatient rehab is an option for patients whose drug or alcohol addiction is more manageable.

However, it is not always the best choice for severe addictions. If you or someone you love suffers from a severe addiction to drugs or alcohol, you should consider inpatient therapy.

Because patients are residents of inpatient therapy centers, there is less temptation to relapse. Spending time in an inpatient setting allows patients to adjust to living without drugs or alcohol and establish positive abstinence and coping strategies. In-depth therapy is offered at inpatient centers, helping patients understand why their addiction formed in the first place and the steps that will allow them to overcome it.

Learn More About Outpatient Rehab at Pathfinders: Call Today

866-263-1847

 

 

Effects of Addiction and Substance Abuse

Addiction and substance abuse are epidemics in America and even around the world. Addiction affects millions of Americans, where their lives are in danger and outright threatened if they continue to abuse drugs or alcohol.

Searching for an “outpatient rehab near me” helps treat those who suffer from addiction to drugs or alcohol and leads them toward recovery. Knowledge about the effects of addiction helps friends and family members stay informed about their loved ones’ addictions.

If you suffer from addiction to drugs or alcohol, it is essential to be knowledgeable about the damaging and detrimental effects so that you can seek treatment if and when they do occur.

Addiction to drugs or alcohol causes serious health risks, both short and long-term. Long-term issues with drug addiction, according to the NIDA, include increased risk of lung disease, heart disease, stroke, cancer, or mental illness. People who use drugs are also at an increased risk of contracting infections or diseases like hepatitis and HIV/AIDS.

Alcohol addiction sometimes causes adverse effects in the brain, heart, liver, and pancreas, as stated by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

Is Outpatient Rehab Right For You? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of individuals that searched "outpatient rehabs near me," is attending a group therapy session as part of their outpatient treatment programs.

Mental Illness and Outpatient Rehabs Near Me

Addiction does not only affect the body in short- and long-term situations; it’s also common for addiction to adversely affect the mind. People who experience substance abuse and addiction issues are more likely to struggle with mental health issues.

While it is not clear why this occurs, some people with mental health issues seek out drugs or alcohol to avoid their illness. Drugs and alcohol generally seem like an escape, but the effects of mental illness often worsen if addiction forms. If you or someone your love struggles with mental illness and addiction, both the mental illness and the addiction should be treated simultaneously.

Some outpatient treatment centers offer treatment for both mental illness and addiction.

If one or both of these issues is severe, the patient should receive more in-depth treatment at an inpatient center. However, if the patient’s mental health and addiction are relatively manageable, outpatient therapy is a safe and effective choice.

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Payment for Treatment at Outpatient Rehabs Near Me

Our company supplies prospective patients with free insurance verification to deal with the complicated process of paying for treatment.

Financing treatment at outpatient rehabs near me sometimes seems like one more problem to add to addiction’s burdensome issue.

We understand this is not an easy process.

But, it is important to remember that our outpatient treatment centers are as dedicated as possible to our patients’ recovery.

Though we wish recovery was a guarantee, relapse is a common issue for those suffering from addiction to face.

However, we want to stress that relapse does not always mean treatment has not helped and will not continue to help.

Recovery is possible after relapse, especially if patients continue rehabilitation with addiction aftercare plans.

For many, relapse is simply an unfortunate but, in some cases, an unavoidable step in the recovery process.

Remember that you are capable of overcoming addiction.

Take a chance on an addiction-free life by contacting us today about whether outpatient treatment centers are right for you.

Our expert physicians and staff are capable of helping you decide which type of rehabilitation fits you best.

We understand how challenging addiction is, which is why we promise to supply you with the skills you need for long-term recovery.

Reach out today for more information if you are looking for  “outpatient rehabs near me.’

What are Some Common Signs of a Drug Addict?

The Signs of a Drug Addict

Information regarding the signs of a drug addict is critical due to its prevalence in America.

Addiction to drugs is an epidemic that kills thousands of people every year.

Drug addiction transforms and hurts people’s lives.

If you think someone you know is susceptible to drug use or addiction, you should learn more about the signs, symptoms, and treatments for drug addiction.

Though addiction to drugs is hurtful and demanding to maintain, recovery is not an easy path either.

Drug addiction changes the brain’s pathways, causing a dependency in the body and compulsive use of the substance.

Even when addiction is hurting them and those they love, someone struggling with an addiction to drugs feels like they have no choice but to continue to use.

Learning and memorizing the signs of an addict or the signs of an addictive personality is essential for prevention and recovery.

Having this knowledge allows you to keep an eye out for those you love who may be vulnerable to drug addiction.

MedlinePlus lists the following as signs of a drug addict:

  • Changes in appetite
  • Loss of interest in favorite things
  • Spending a lot of time alone
  • Not practicing self-care
  • Quick changes in mood
  • Being very tired and sad
  • Changing friends more than usual
  • Having a lot of energy, chattering
  • Having issues in work or school
  • Having issues with family or friends

What are Some Common Signs of a Drug Addict? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of individuals in inpatient rehab that showed signs of a drug addict and decided to enter treatment is discussing experiences in their lives, healthy coping mechanisms, and supportive advice for one another as they work toward recovery and long-term sobriety.

Understanding the Signs of a Drug Addict

Knowledge of the signs of an addict is constructive, but it is crucial to know the next steps and how addiction occurs if you believe someone you love may suffer from addiction.

Drug addiction can develop quickly over a short period or slowly and invisibly. When a person begins using drugs, the effects on the body are intense and euphoric. Over time, if a person continues usage, the body needs more and more of the substance to produce a high.

Addiction forms when the body is dependent on the substance and usage is no longer voluntary. Drug use turns compulsive, and addicts feel as if they need the substance to survive. If that person discontinues the use of the drug, the body experiences intense withdrawal symptoms.

Certain people are more susceptible to drug addictions.

This information helps prevent drug use and addiction because concerned family members can implement positive drug-avoidance strategies.

MedlinePlus lists the following as risks for drug addiction:

  • Individual biology: some people are only less likely to enjoy drug use. If someone tries drugs once and hates them, they are much less likely to form an addiction. Addiction is more common in people who enjoy drug use.
  • Mental health issues.
  • Trouble at home: children, adults, and teens who have a difficult home life are more likely to develop a drug addiction.
  • Trouble with school, work or making friends.
  • Spending time with people who use drugs.
  • Starting drug use at a young age.

If you noticed these symptoms in a friend or a family member, speak to someone responsible and knowledgeable about these concerns.

Preventative measures or early interventions help stop addiction from forming.

After addiction forms, it is incredibly challenging to recover from.

If you believe you may help someone prevent addiction, acting sooner rather than later could save a life.

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Effects and Abuse of Drugs

Though it is best to prevent addiction early on, this is not always a possibility. Sometimes, the forming of habit is not an easy thing to see. By the time family members or friends spot the signs of an addict, addiction is already present.

Addiction causes both short and long-term effects on the body and mind. Familiarizing yourself with these effects allows you to help secure treatment for the person you think may struggle with addiction. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) lists the long and short-term risks of drug addiction as follows:

Short-term risks:

  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Overdose
  • Changes in sleep patterns, mood, heart rate, and appetite

Long-term increased risks:

  • Heart or lung disease
  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis
  • Mental illness

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Mental Illness and Drug Abuse

Drug abuse and mental illness commonly occur together in the same patient. Drug addiction often leads to mental illness and vice-versa. They are sometimes direct causes of one another, or they can develop together. They may occur together because they affect the same parts of the brain, according to the NIDA. It is also possible for people to turn to drugs because their mental disorder has made them feel upset, anxious, or distracted. Because of these factors, mental illnesses are sometimes signs of an addictive personality.

If mental illness and drug addiction occur together, patients must receive treatment for both issues. The presence of mental illness makes a recovery from drug addiction more difficult if not adequately addressed and treated. It is possible to overcome both mental health issues and drug addiction through treatment.

Common mental health issues to watch out for include:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • ADHD
  • Bipolar disorder

What are Some Common Signs of a Drug Addict? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A young man is sitting with an addiction specialist for an initial consultation to determine if he has the signs of a drug addict and if he requires treatment.

Treatment for the Signs of a Drug Addict

People who display the signs of an addict receive treatment from the expert staff at hospitals or rehabilitation centers. Treating drug addictions is in no way simple; relapse is common, and the body’s compulsive need for the drug makes maintenance of recovery extremely challenging. Though relapse often occurs and makes recovery much more challenging, it does not mean that treatment has not helped and recovery is impossible.

In fact, recovery is still possible even after multiple relapses.

According to the NIDA, there are three main goals of addiction treatment:

  1. Stopping drug use
  2. Maintaining a drug-free life
  3. Becoming or continuing to be a productive member of society.

Treatment is adjusted to fit what works best for each patient, so it involves trial and error.

Common treatments for the signs of a drug addict include medication, participation in support groups, counseling to diagnose mental health issues, and therapy.

In therapy, patients focus on understanding the reasons they became addicted to drugs in the first place. Therapy also teaches patients how to remain drug-free and avoid relapse. Support groups provide patients with an essential sense of camaraderie. Being surrounded by understanding people who have experienced similar things has excellent healing potential.

Recovery can last a lifetime, so long-term care is sometimes needed to prevent relapse.

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Payment for Treatment

We know that it is not easy to afford treatment.

Because drug addiction rehabilitation can be expensive, we provide free insurance verification for every client. Our insurance verification allows you to find out immediately whether your insurance company covers rehab so that you can figure out financing.

Though it is demanding, recovery is possible with the right resources and support networks. Our dedication is to our patients and their recovery.

Though we cannot guarantee that every patient will recover, our focus always rests on providing the patients with knowledge, care, and compassion to ensure the best recovery chance.

Please do not hesitate to reach out to us if you think you or someone you love displays signs of a drug addict or signs of an addictive personality.

We are here to help.

The 4 Most Commonly Abused Drugs on College Campuses

If you are going away to college, it is often the first time you will be living away from home.

You will need to steer clear of college drugs.

Because you want to fit in, you might attempt to prove yourself when other peers are experimenting with drugs.

Often college campuses offer a higher frequency of partying and illegal drugs.

You need to be careful because college drugs are prevalent, and drugs on college campuses are no joke.

There are four main college drugs commonly abused: alcohol, marijuana, prescription drugs, and OTC or over-the-counter medications.

Also, ecstasy and cocaine are common.

4 Most Commonly Abused Drugs on College Campuses Pathfinders - 2 women and 2 men play beer pong during a study break in college. Alcohol is the most abused college drug.

College Drugs: Alcohol

The most abused of all the college drugs is alcohol.

Although alcohol is legal for students 21 and up, it is not safe nor legal for anyone under 18.

College students also tend to binge drink when they drink on campus.

Binge drinking is the act of consuming more than three or four drinks in one sitting.
Alcohol is one of the easy college drugs to abuse because it is relatively inexpensive and very accessible.

Many college students are over the age of 21.

Reasons that college students drink alcohol include:

  • Relaxation
  • Attempt to fit in
  • Peer pressure
  • Party and have fun
  • Stress reliever
  • To be more social
  • Reduce anxiety or depression

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How College Students View Alcohol

People glorify alcohol in movies, music, and television. Most college students do not consider it to be a drug or see it as dangerous. Drinking alcohol looks fun, and young people have less impulse control than adults. College is also known as a time for being social by attending parties, which only increases alcohol use. Further, alcohol companies target young people with fruity or sugary alcoholic drinks. These make it easy to enjoy drinking alcohol without the bitter taste.

Dangers of Binge Drinking

  • Injuries
  • Sexual assault
  • Health problems
  • Drunk driving
  • Police involvement
  • Death

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College Drugs: Marijuana

The second most popular of all college drugs is marijuana. Marijuana is known as reefer, weed, pot, or “Mary Jane,” and around 47% of college students use marijuana. Due to its legalities in many states, marijuana is popular in the media and present in pop culture.
Although marijuana is not typically addictive, nine percent of users become addicted.

How College Students View Marijuana

Marijuana is easy to come by and much less expensive than other drugs. An 18-year-old can obtain a medical marijuana card in many states, while 21-year-olds can purchase it for recreational use in some states.
People commonly smoke marijuana, but college students often enjoy brownies containing marijuana. College students use marijuana to calm nerves, stop anxiety, fit in, or relax.
Dangers of Marijuana

  •  Loss of coordination
  • Increased heart rate
  • Lowered immune system
  • Traffic accidents under the influence
  • Police involvement
  • Poor memory
  • Slowed reaction times
  • Breathing problems
  • Lack of motivation

College Drugs: Prescription Drugs

There is an epidemic with drugs across college campuses in the form of prescription drug abuse. Often these medications are easily obtained through your prescription or that of a friend. Sixty-two percent of students with a valid prescription for ADHD medication, such as Adderall, give it to other students without prescriptions.
This use of college drugs is not only illegal but also very dangerous. Every day 100 people die in the United States from a drug overdose; many of these deaths are prescription drug-related. Additionally, in 2016, 10% of college students admittedly used Adderall.
But why do college students abuse prescription drugs? Because there is so much pressure to perform in college, one of the college drugs abused is Adderall. These help to improve focus and can act almost like a brain boost.

Narcotics and Benzodiazepines

Prescription drugs abused by students also include narcotics and central nervous system depressants. Central nervous system depressants are known as tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, and sleep aids. Valium and Xanax are benzodiazepines that are tranquilizers. These drugs help relieve the anxiety that many students find in college, but they are also highly addictive.

College Drugs: OTC Medications

Another class of college drugs often found on college campuses are over-the-counter medications, known as OTC medications. These are typically cough medicines available for purchase at any store. They contain dextromethorphan or DXM, such as Nyquil. Other than Nyquil, there are also hundreds of other options. Not only are these easy to obtain, but they are completely legal to be bought by anyone over the age of 18.

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How Are OTC Medications Abused?

College students will find ways to abuse drugs. Students might drink an entire bottle of cough medicine or take a whole box of pills at once. This amount can cause an out-of-body experience but can be extremely dangerous.
The most dangerous aspect is that college students do not understand the dangers associated with these college drugs. OTC medications can cause dizziness, nausea, and motor control loss, but severe side-effects and death are possible when combined with other drugs.

Mental Illness and College Drugs

If you are in college and dealing with an undiagnosed mental illness, you may look to college drugs to self-medicate. Self-medicating is not smart because you may misuse these drugs and cause more harm than good.

Drug Abuse Warning Signs for College Students

  • Poor academic performance or change in performance
  • Changes in weight: gain or loss
  • Isolation
  • Withdrawal from friends and activities
  • Unidentified pill bottles
  • Troubles with the law
  • Traffic accidents
  • Sudden outbursts
  • Skipping classes
  • Agitation
  • Oversleeping or insomnia
  • Decreased focus
  • Lack of motivation
  • Depression

4 Most Commonly Abused Drugs on College Campuses Pathfinders - Several college students meet at evening IOP rehab to discuss triggers. They became addiction to 1 of the 4 most abused college drugs from parting too hard in school.

Treatment for Addiction to College Drugs

If you or someone you love is struggling with drug addiction in college, there are many treatments. Inpatient treatment is the most common and essential for severe addictions. Outpatient treatment is less intense and will allow you to go about your daily life. Otherwise, there are forms of treatment such as peer meetings and sober living that require weekly therapy sessions, accountability check-ins, and meetings.

Outpatient Treatment

If you cannot disrupt your college classes and want to go to treatment while attending school, you can do outpatient treatment. Outpatient is the best course of action for students with a moderate addiction. Rather than spend 30-90 days at a facility, you visit the treatment center three times weekly for two to three hours each. Outpatient will allow you to continue your life while still going to treatment and maintaining accountability.

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Free Yourself from College Drugs

If you are struggling with an addiction to alcohol or any drug, we can help.

At Pathfinders, we offer a variety of treatment programs to help you get sober and stay sober.

Free yourself from college drugs and get healthy again.

Contact us today to learn about our programs and how you can utilize our free insurance verification for treatment.