Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies

Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies Pathfinders Recovery Center - A family all holding hands together, an analogy for exploring the link between family genetics and addiction tendencies.

We often hear of people having an addictive personality, or even that addiction runs in families.

It does bring up the question: “Why does one person get addicted to drugs or alcohol and another doesn’t? Is addiction linked to genetics?”

Is it possible to be predisposed to addiction? Is there a genetic link to addiction? If your parent or relative struggles with drug or alcohol addiction, do family genetics mean there’s no hope for you?

We’re going to answer all of these questions for you in this article.

Keep reading to learn about the genetic predisposition to addiction and general addiction tendencies based on your DNA.

What Is Addiction?

The American Society of Addiction Medicine states that addiction is a direct effect of the reward and motivational part of our brains being affected by an overwhelming need to “pursue reward or relief by substance use and behaviors.”

Alcohol addiction is one of the most common addictions in the United States.

An estimated 15.1 million people have an alcohol use disorder (AUD).

While most of us immediately think of alcoholism when we think of addiction, you can be addicted to many different substances and/or behaviors.

Some other examples of common addictions include:

  • Tobacco
  • Opioids
  • Sex
  • Cocaine
  • Benzos
  • Gambling

Any substance or behavior that affects your pleasure and/or reward system in the brain has the potential to become an addiction.

Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies Pathfinders - A husband and father is pouring another drink at the dining room table while his wife and daughter stand behind him depressed and watching him suffer with his alcoholism, as he wonders whether addiction is linked to genetics or not before seeking treatment.

Is Addiction a Disease?

Addiction is defined as a chronic disease of the brain that affects you mentally, physically, and socially.

Addiction directly disrupts normal brain function that impairs your judgment, learning, motivation, memory, and reward/relief systems.

Genetic Links to Addiction

As with other diseases, there are a number of factors that contribute to the development of the disease.

These factors include social settings, environmental factors, behavioral factors, and family genetics.

Let’s get a little bit more into the genetic predisposition associated with addiction.

“Addiction Genes”

There has been a scientific effort to uncover the specific genes that would result in addiction and drug abuse disorders.

This brings up two questions: “Why would there be genes for addiction anyway? If addiction is so harmful, shouldn’t those types of genes have already been eliminated from our population due to natural selection?”

Some argue that “addiction genes” may have helped our early ancestors to promote motivation and feelings of pleasure/reward for things like gathering food, procreating, etc. Once these genes are in place to reward us, it can affect how we behave with other things that give us pleasure, like drugs and alcohol.

There has been some success in finding particular “addiction genes.” As with most things concerning genetics, there is no one specific “addiction gene.” Instead, it’s a complex system of different genes and chemicals that can lead to addictive tendencies.

One common gene found in many drug addicts and alcoholics is a gene that affects dopamine receptors in the brain, specifically the DRD2 gene.

Dopamine is this “feel good” chemical in your brain. When you do something pleasurable (like drugs), your brain releases dopamine, which makes you feel good and makes you want to do more of that thing.

If your dopamine receptors are changed or more receptive to dopamine, it could make it easier to become addicted to drugs.

This is just one example of a potential “addiction gene” found by scientists. Hundreds of other genes can contribute to a predisposition to addiction. See some more examples here.

Twin Studies

Some of the most telling facts about addiction and genetics are genetics looking at family history and relatives with addiction.

Studies show that genetics amount to up to 50% of the likelihood that you’ll develop an addiction.

How do we know this? One study looked at over 1,000 sets of twins. Identical twins have the same genetic make-up. Therefore, if addiction were solely genetic, we would assume that if one twin had a substance abuse issue, the other twin would as well.

However, they found that if one twin had an addiction, the other twin was likely to have an addiction. But, they found that if one twin had an addiction, it didn’t mean the other twin had an addiction too.

In simple terms, this study found that genes have a large factor in addiction since the likelihood of twins having an addiction was high.

However, when one twin had an addiction, many of their twins with the same genes did not have an addiction.

This indicates that other factors that contribute to addiction besides genetics, even if addiction is linked to genetics.

Other studies support these findings.

This leads to the consensus that genetics amount to half of the predisposition/risk of developing an addiction.

Children of Parents Struggling with Addiction

When thinking about addiction’s genetic component, we have to look at the history of drug addiction in families.

One of the easiest ways to study the genetic links to addiction is to look at the children of those struggling with addiction.

These individuals struggling with substance abuse pass on their genes to their children. So, if there is a genetic link, logic tells us that the children of these individuals should also have substance abuse issues at one point or another. They should at least be at a much higher risk of addiction compared to children of those that do not have drug or alcohol issues.

And studies have found that this is, in fact, the case.

Children of those struggling with addiction are eight times more likely also to develop an addiction than children of individuals without substance abuse issues.

Another study showed that people who use drugs are more likely to have at least one parent that also uses drugs.

Is It Really Genetics? Digging Deeper

After everything we’ve just gone over, from the specific genetic findings to the family statistics, you might think it’s definite that genetics is the factor that causes addiction.

While it’s true addiction is linked to genetics, there are questions related to how much this means in terms of genetic predisposition.

However, we can’t ignore the behavioral and social aspects of family life that have nothing to do with genetics.

Children growing up with parents who normalize drug and alcohol use may simply use drugs because socially, it seemed normal. This doesn’t have to do with their genes; it has to do with their social environment.

While family statistics and studies show a link between genetics and addiction, it’s also important to remember that addiction is a complex disease with many factors, including social and behavioral factors.

Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies Pathfinders - A man struggling with substance abuse has decided to enter treatment after learning that addiction is linked to genetics and his parents struggled with addiction. He is taking part in an initial group therapy session to discuss his story and gain insight for healthy coping mechanisms to break free from addiction.

Other Factors that Can Lead to Addiction

Continuing with this idea, let’s look at some other factors that can contribute to addiction besides “addiction genes.”

Some of the most significant risk factors for addiction include:

  • Stress
  • Mental health disorders, such as depression, eating disorders, anxiety, etc.
  • Emotional/physical trauma
  • Peer pressure
  • Pop culture exposure
  • Easy access to drugs/alcohol
  • Social environment

Predisposition Is Not Certainty

This brings us to a very important point.

Just because you’re predisposed or have a higher risk of developing an addiction doesn’t mean you definitely will.

Your entire family could struggle with alcohol and drug abuse, and you could have multiple “addiction genes.”

But this does not mean addiction is inevitable for you.

If you feel you have many risk factors and can feel yourself potentially going down the wrong path, you can learn coping skills and enter treatment before an addiction develops.

Understanding your risks as a child or relative of someone who struggles with substance abuse can be a way to regulate your drug use. It can also help you understand you’re predisposed to addiction, which might motivate you to seek help before things get worse.

Each of these factors could lead to a higher risk of addiction, no matter what genes you have.

Addiction is complex and is the result of not one but many factors.

Genetics could be a big part of what leads someone down the addiction path, but it’s not the only factor. Although it is still essential to be aware that addiction is linked to genetics.

Family Genetics and Addiction: Bottom Line

You’ve probably heard that alcoholism is a family disease, and on some level, that’s true.

Addiction is linked to genetics and drug abuse disorders.

However, it’s also important to recognize that addiction is a complex disease that cannot be pinpointed on one factor or cause. It’s a myriad of social and biological triggers that come together to form the perfect storm known as addiction.

If you or a family member is struggling to stay sober, contact us today.

We can help those suffering from addiction overcome their reliance and live a healthier, more stable life.

 

Are You Searching For “Outpatient Rehabs Near Me?”

Substance Abuse Treatment Near Me Pathfinders Recovery Center - A young woman researched "substance abuse treatment near me" and is meeting with an addiction specialist to discuss her substance abuse issues.

Outpatient rehabs near me are sometimes the most effective choice for treating addiction.

Choosing to seek rehabilitation is difficult to make.

Having to determine what type of rehab to attend makes the decision even more complicated.

Alcohol and drug rehabilitation, whether inpatient or outpatient, is an effective and common form of treatment for addiction.

The competent and empathetic staff that have their best interests in mind surround the patient.

Read on for information about how to choose whether you attend inpatient or outpatient rehab.

Is Outpatient Rehab Right For You? Pathfinders Recovery Center - An individual who searched "outpatient rehabs near me," is meeting with an addiction specialist to determine if inpatient or outpatient rehab is the right choice for their level of substance abuse or addiction.

About Outpatient Rehabs Near Me

While both are effective options for substance abuse rehab depending on your specific level of addiction, inpatient and outpatient programs have essential differences.

Outpatient rehab allows patients to continue living at home as they attend therapy for addiction, while inpatient rehab involves patients remaining as residents at the rehab facility. Many patients prefer to attend outpatient rehab because of its added flexibility.

Still, the right choice of rehab depends on multiple factors, including the severity of the patient’s addiction, the familial and living situation of the patient, and the patient’s overall health. Understanding there are options to make your recovery as comfortable as possible is a significant factor in accepting the help you need.

Some outpatient rehabs near me offer various degrees of intensity in their treatments, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Although they can be quite helpful as an addiction aftercare initiative, low-intensity programs may not offer the necessary help that one who is struggling with addiction needs to lead a sober lifestyle.

While knowledge of addiction and education about recovery is beneficial to patients and their loved ones, severe addictions often require more intense treatment.

When considering outpatient rehab, remember this type of treatment may not be all-encompassing as other program options.

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Understanding Outpatient Rehab vs. Inpatient Rehab

Residential rehab is an ideal option for those that have been abusing alcohol or drugs for a long time, in large quantities, and on a frequent basis. Residential rehabilitation centers should maintain an up-to-date license to offer best practices for clients residing in inpatient rehab.

There is a community-centered feel with inpatient rehab, as patients live with clinical doctors and people who struggle with the same issues. For some patients, this aspect of the community draws them to inpatient rehab and helps them know recovery is possible. You can find more information on inpatient rehab from the NIDA here.

Licensed outpatient treatment centers offer outpatient rehab during the day, where patients come in a few times a week but do not live at the rehab facility. Treatment at outpatient rehab includes individual and group counseling.

Patients typically participate in behavioral treatments such as the following:

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT): This is where patients learn to recognize and cope with compulsive addiction situations.
  • Multidimensional Family Therapy: This therapy works with adolescents who attend therapy with their families to improve their family dynamic and address any substance abuse issues.
  • Motivational Interviewing: This therapy utilizes the motivation of patients for a drug-free life.
  • Motivational Incentives: This therapy uses positive reinforcement to encourage drug or alcohol abstinence.

Patients may continue outpatient rehab for prolonged amounts of time if necessary. Outpatient rehab often starts intensely, with patients attending therapy multiple days a week. Over time, sessions become shorter and less frequent if patients find that their recovery journey is going well and they are maintaining their sobriety.

Though outpatient rehab is an option for patients whose drug or alcohol addiction is more manageable.

However, it is not always the best choice for severe addictions. If you or someone you love suffers from a severe addiction to drugs or alcohol, you should consider inpatient therapy.

Because patients are residents of inpatient therapy centers, there is less temptation to relapse. Spending time in an inpatient setting allows patients to adjust to living without drugs or alcohol and establish positive abstinence and coping strategies. In-depth therapy is offered at inpatient centers, helping patients understand why their addiction formed in the first place and the steps that will allow them to overcome it.

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Effects of Addiction and Substance Abuse

Addiction and substance abuse are epidemics in America and even around the world. Addiction affects millions of Americans, where their lives are in danger and outright threatened if they continue to abuse drugs or alcohol.

Searching for an “outpatient rehab near me” helps treat those who suffer from addiction to drugs or alcohol and leads them toward recovery. Knowledge about the effects of addiction helps friends and family members stay informed about their loved ones’ addictions.

If you suffer from addiction to drugs or alcohol, it is essential to be knowledgeable about the damaging and detrimental effects so that you can seek treatment if and when they do occur.

Addiction to drugs or alcohol causes serious health risks, both short and long-term. Long-term issues with drug addiction, according to the NIDA, include increased risk of lung disease, heart disease, stroke, cancer, or mental illness. People who use drugs are also at an increased risk of contracting infections or diseases like hepatitis and HIV/AIDS.

Alcohol addiction sometimes causes adverse effects in the brain, heart, liver, and pancreas, as stated by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

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Mental Illness and Outpatient Rehabs Near Me

Addiction does not only affect the body in short- and long-term situations; it’s also common for addiction to adversely affect the mind. People who experience substance abuse and addiction issues are more likely to struggle with mental health issues.

While it is not clear why this occurs, some people with mental health issues seek out drugs or alcohol to avoid their illness. Drugs and alcohol generally seem like an escape, but the effects of mental illness often worsen if addiction forms. If you or someone your love struggles with mental illness and addiction, both the mental illness and the addiction should be treated simultaneously.

Some outpatient treatment centers offer treatment for both mental illness and addiction.

If one or both of these issues is severe, the patient should receive more in-depth treatment at an inpatient center. However, if the patient’s mental health and addiction are relatively manageable, outpatient therapy is a safe and effective choice.

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Payment for Treatment at Outpatient Rehabs Near Me

Our company supplies prospective patients with free insurance verification to deal with the complicated process of paying for treatment.

Financing treatment at outpatient rehabs near me sometimes seems like one more problem to add to addiction’s burdensome issue.

We understand this is not an easy process.

But, it is important to remember that our outpatient treatment centers are as dedicated as possible to our patients’ recovery.

Though we wish recovery was a guarantee, relapse is a common issue for those suffering from addiction to face.

However, we want to stress that relapse does not always mean treatment has not helped and will not continue to help.

Recovery is possible after relapse, especially if patients continue rehabilitation with addiction aftercare plans.

For many, relapse is simply an unfortunate but, in some cases, an unavoidable step in the recovery process.

Remember that you are capable of overcoming addiction.

Take a chance on an addiction-free life by contacting us today about whether outpatient treatment centers are right for you.

Our expert physicians and staff are capable of helping you decide which type of rehabilitation fits you best.

We understand how challenging addiction is, which is why we promise to supply you with the skills you need for long-term recovery.

Reach out today for more information if you are looking for  “outpatient rehabs near me.’

What are Some Common Signs of a Drug Addict?

The Signs of a Drug Addict

Information regarding the signs of a drug addict is critical due to its prevalence in America.

Addiction to drugs is an epidemic that kills thousands of people every year.

Drug addiction transforms and hurts people’s lives.

If you think someone you know is susceptible to drug use or addiction, you should learn more about the signs, symptoms, and treatments for drug addiction.

Though addiction to drugs is hurtful and demanding to maintain, recovery is not an easy path either.

Drug addiction changes the brain’s pathways, causing a dependency in the body and compulsive use of the substance.

Even when addiction is hurting them and those they love, someone struggling with an addiction to drugs feels like they have no choice but to continue to use.

Learning and memorizing the signs of an addict or the signs of an addictive personality is essential for prevention and recovery.

Having this knowledge allows you to keep an eye out for those you love who may be vulnerable to drug addiction.

MedlinePlus lists the following as signs of a drug addict:

  • Changes in appetite
  • Loss of interest in favorite things
  • Spending a lot of time alone
  • Not practicing self-care
  • Quick changes in mood
  • Being very tired and sad
  • Changing friends more than usual
  • Having a lot of energy, chattering
  • Having issues in work or school
  • Having issues with family or friends

What are Some Common Signs of a Drug Addict? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of individuals in inpatient rehab that showed signs of a drug addict and decided to enter treatment is discussing experiences in their lives, healthy coping mechanisms, and supportive advice for one another as they work toward recovery and long-term sobriety.

Understanding the Signs of a Drug Addict

Knowledge of the signs of an addict is constructive, but it is crucial to know the next steps and how addiction occurs if you believe someone you love may suffer from addiction.

Drug addiction can develop quickly over a short period or slowly and invisibly. When a person begins using drugs, the effects on the body are intense and euphoric. Over time, if a person continues usage, the body needs more and more of the substance to produce a high.

Addiction forms when the body is dependent on the substance and usage is no longer voluntary. Drug use turns compulsive, and addicts feel as if they need the substance to survive. If that person discontinues the use of the drug, the body experiences intense withdrawal symptoms.

Certain people are more susceptible to drug addictions.

This information helps prevent drug use and addiction because concerned family members can implement positive drug-avoidance strategies.

MedlinePlus lists the following as risks for drug addiction:

  • Individual biology: some people are only less likely to enjoy drug use. If someone tries drugs once and hates them, they are much less likely to form an addiction. Addiction is more common in people who enjoy drug use.
  • Mental health issues.
  • Trouble at home: children, adults, and teens who have a difficult home life are more likely to develop a drug addiction.
  • Trouble with school, work or making friends.
  • Spending time with people who use drugs.
  • Starting drug use at a young age.

If you noticed these symptoms in a friend or a family member, speak to someone responsible and knowledgeable about these concerns.

Preventative measures or early interventions help stop addiction from forming.

After addiction forms, it is incredibly challenging to recover from.

If you believe you may help someone prevent addiction, acting sooner rather than later could save a life.

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Effects and Abuse of Drugs

Though it is best to prevent addiction early on, this is not always a possibility. Sometimes, the forming of habit is not an easy thing to see. By the time family members or friends spot the signs of an addict, addiction is already present.

Addiction causes both short and long-term effects on the body and mind. Familiarizing yourself with these effects allows you to help secure treatment for the person you think may struggle with addiction. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) lists the long and short-term risks of drug addiction as follows:

Short-term risks:

  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Overdose
  • Changes in sleep patterns, mood, heart rate, and appetite

Long-term increased risks:

  • Heart or lung disease
  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis
  • Mental illness

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Mental Illness and Drug Abuse

Drug abuse and mental illness commonly occur together in the same patient. Drug addiction often leads to mental illness and vice-versa. They are sometimes direct causes of one another, or they can develop together. They may occur together because they affect the same parts of the brain, according to the NIDA. It is also possible for people to turn to drugs because their mental disorder has made them feel upset, anxious, or distracted. Because of these factors, mental illnesses are sometimes signs of an addictive personality.

If mental illness and drug addiction occur together, patients must receive treatment for both issues. The presence of mental illness makes a recovery from drug addiction more difficult if not adequately addressed and treated. It is possible to overcome both mental health issues and drug addiction through treatment.

Common mental health issues to watch out for include:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • ADHD
  • Bipolar disorder

What are Some Common Signs of a Drug Addict? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A young man is sitting with an addiction specialist for an initial consultation to determine if he has the signs of a drug addict and if he requires treatment.

Treatment for the Signs of a Drug Addict

People who display the signs of an addict receive treatment from the expert staff at hospitals or rehabilitation centers. Treating drug addictions is in no way simple; relapse is common, and the body’s compulsive need for the drug makes maintenance of recovery extremely challenging. Though relapse often occurs and makes recovery much more challenging, it does not mean that treatment has not helped and recovery is impossible.

In fact, recovery is still possible even after multiple relapses.

According to the NIDA, there are three main goals of addiction treatment:

  1. Stopping drug use
  2. Maintaining a drug-free life
  3. Becoming or continuing to be a productive member of society.

Treatment is adjusted to fit what works best for each patient, so it involves trial and error.

Common treatments for the signs of a drug addict include medication, participation in support groups, counseling to diagnose mental health issues, and therapy.

In therapy, patients focus on understanding the reasons they became addicted to drugs in the first place. Therapy also teaches patients how to remain drug-free and avoid relapse. Support groups provide patients with an essential sense of camaraderie. Being surrounded by understanding people who have experienced similar things has excellent healing potential.

Recovery can last a lifetime, so long-term care is sometimes needed to prevent relapse.

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Payment for Treatment

We know that it is not easy to afford treatment.

Because drug addiction rehabilitation can be expensive, we provide free insurance verification for every client. Our insurance verification allows you to find out immediately whether your insurance company covers rehab so that you can figure out financing.

Though it is demanding, recovery is possible with the right resources and support networks. Our dedication is to our patients and their recovery.

Though we cannot guarantee that every patient will recover, our focus always rests on providing the patients with knowledge, care, and compassion to ensure the best recovery chance.

Please do not hesitate to reach out to us if you think you or someone you love displays signs of a drug addict or signs of an addictive personality.

We are here to help.

The 4 Most Commonly Abused Drugs on College Campuses

If you are going away to college, it is often the first time you will be living away from home.

You will need to steer clear of college drugs.

Because you want to fit in, you might attempt to prove yourself when other peers are experimenting with drugs.

Often college campuses offer a higher frequency of partying and illegal drugs.

You need to be careful because college drugs are prevalent, and drugs on college campuses are no joke.

There are four main college drugs commonly abused: alcohol, marijuana, prescription drugs, and OTC or over-the-counter medications.

Also, ecstasy and cocaine are common.

4 Most Commonly Abused Drugs on College Campuses Pathfinders - 2 women and 2 men play beer pong during a study break in college. Alcohol is the most abused college drug.

College Drugs: Alcohol

The most abused of all the college drugs is alcohol.

Although alcohol is legal for students 21 and up, it is not safe nor legal for anyone under 18.

College students also tend to binge drink when they drink on campus.

Binge drinking is the act of consuming more than three or four drinks in one sitting.
Alcohol is one of the easy college drugs to abuse because it is relatively inexpensive and very accessible.

Many college students are over the age of 21.

Reasons that college students drink alcohol include:

  • Relaxation
  • Attempt to fit in
  • Peer pressure
  • Party and have fun
  • Stress reliever
  • To be more social
  • Reduce anxiety or depression

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How College Students View Alcohol

People glorify alcohol in movies, music, and television. Most college students do not consider it to be a drug or see it as dangerous. Drinking alcohol looks fun, and young people have less impulse control than adults. College is also known as a time for being social by attending parties, which only increases alcohol use. Further, alcohol companies target young people with fruity or sugary alcoholic drinks. These make it easy to enjoy drinking alcohol without the bitter taste.

Dangers of Binge Drinking

  • Injuries
  • Sexual assault
  • Health problems
  • Drunk driving
  • Police involvement
  • Death

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College Drugs: Marijuana

The second most popular of all college drugs is marijuana. Marijuana is known as reefer, weed, pot, or “Mary Jane,” and around 47% of college students use marijuana. Due to its legalities in many states, marijuana is popular in the media and present in pop culture.
Although marijuana is not typically addictive, nine percent of users become addicted.

How College Students View Marijuana

Marijuana is easy to come by and much less expensive than other drugs. An 18-year-old can obtain a medical marijuana card in many states, while 21-year-olds can purchase it for recreational use in some states.
People commonly smoke marijuana, but college students often enjoy brownies containing marijuana. College students use marijuana to calm nerves, stop anxiety, fit in, or relax.
Dangers of Marijuana

  •  Loss of coordination
  • Increased heart rate
  • Lowered immune system
  • Traffic accidents under the influence
  • Police involvement
  • Poor memory
  • Slowed reaction times
  • Breathing problems
  • Lack of motivation

College Drugs: Prescription Drugs

There is an epidemic with drugs across college campuses in the form of prescription drug abuse. Often these medications are easily obtained through your prescription or that of a friend. Sixty-two percent of students with a valid prescription for ADHD medication, such as Adderall, give it to other students without prescriptions.
This use of college drugs is not only illegal but also very dangerous. Every day 100 people die in the United States from a drug overdose; many of these deaths are prescription drug-related. Additionally, in 2016, 10% of college students admittedly used Adderall.
But why do college students abuse prescription drugs? Because there is so much pressure to perform in college, one of the college drugs abused is Adderall. These help to improve focus and can act almost like a brain boost.

Narcotics and Benzodiazepines

Prescription drugs abused by students also include narcotics and central nervous system depressants. Central nervous system depressants are known as tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, and sleep aids. Valium and Xanax are benzodiazepines that are tranquilizers. These drugs help relieve the anxiety that many students find in college, but they are also highly addictive.

College Drugs: OTC Medications

Another class of college drugs often found on college campuses are over-the-counter medications, known as OTC medications. These are typically cough medicines available for purchase at any store. They contain dextromethorphan or DXM, such as Nyquil. Other than Nyquil, there are also hundreds of other options. Not only are these easy to obtain, but they are completely legal to be bought by anyone over the age of 18.

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How Are OTC Medications Abused?

College students will find ways to abuse drugs. Students might drink an entire bottle of cough medicine or take a whole box of pills at once. This amount can cause an out-of-body experience but can be extremely dangerous.
The most dangerous aspect is that college students do not understand the dangers associated with these college drugs. OTC medications can cause dizziness, nausea, and motor control loss, but severe side-effects and death are possible when combined with other drugs.

Mental Illness and College Drugs

If you are in college and dealing with an undiagnosed mental illness, you may look to college drugs to self-medicate. Self-medicating is not smart because you may misuse these drugs and cause more harm than good.

Drug Abuse Warning Signs for College Students

  • Poor academic performance or change in performance
  • Changes in weight: gain or loss
  • Isolation
  • Withdrawal from friends and activities
  • Unidentified pill bottles
  • Troubles with the law
  • Traffic accidents
  • Sudden outbursts
  • Skipping classes
  • Agitation
  • Oversleeping or insomnia
  • Decreased focus
  • Lack of motivation
  • Depression

4 Most Commonly Abused Drugs on College Campuses Pathfinders - Several college students meet at evening IOP rehab to discuss triggers. They became addiction to 1 of the 4 most abused college drugs from parting too hard in school.

Treatment for Addiction to College Drugs

If you or someone you love is struggling with drug addiction in college, there are many treatments. Inpatient treatment is the most common and essential for severe addictions. Outpatient treatment is less intense and will allow you to go about your daily life. Otherwise, there are forms of treatment such as peer meetings and sober living that require weekly therapy sessions, accountability check-ins, and meetings.

Outpatient Treatment

If you cannot disrupt your college classes and want to go to treatment while attending school, you can do outpatient treatment. Outpatient is the best course of action for students with a moderate addiction. Rather than spend 30-90 days at a facility, you visit the treatment center three times weekly for two to three hours each. Outpatient will allow you to continue your life while still going to treatment and maintaining accountability.

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Free Yourself from College Drugs

If you are struggling with an addiction to alcohol or any drug, we can help.

At Pathfinders, we offer a variety of treatment programs to help you get sober and stay sober.

Free yourself from college drugs and get healthy again.

Contact us today to learn about our programs and how you can utilize our free insurance verification for treatment.

Faith-Based Addiction Treatment

Faith-Based Addiction Treatment

Many people struggle with fighting addiction, but it can be easier to fight your addiction through faith-based addiction treatment.

If you are religious, there are unique aspects of recovery that you do not realize.

Abusing drugs and alcohol can affect your faith and religion.

Because 76.5% of Americans identified as religious in 2015, faith-based addiction treatment is a suitable option.

Whether or not you are religious, drug addiction often feels like a moral or ethical failing.

By going to faith-based addiction treatment, you can connect with your high power to overcome addiction.

Faith-based addiction treatment and rehab will allow your religious beliefs to grow during treatment, making you a stronger person.

Faith-Based Addiction Treatment Pathfinders - Photo showing the laps of 3 people who are in a faith based addiction treatment program as they read from their bibles.

What is Faith-Based Addiction Treatment?

Faith-based addiction treatment addresses your medical and spiritual needs.

Even though the spiritual aspect is a large focus, treatment still needs to contain standard drug rehab techniques.

These techniques might include medically-assisted detox and behavioral therapy.

Healing the soul and managing withdrawal symptoms and cravings are equally important.

Standard addiction treatments in faith-based rehab might include:

  • Drug detox
  • Individual therapy
  • Group therapy
  • Prescribed medication for withdrawal symptoms
  • Life skills and emotional coping training

In faith-based addiction treatment, certified spiritual advisors are present for all counseling.

They offer guidance during your treatment, along with individual and group sessions.

These counselors help you find peace by way of faith.

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Narcotics Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous

You may have heard of the support groups NA and AA. These acronyms stand for narcotics anonymous and alcoholics anonymous. These support groups are faith-based addiction treatment, as they incorporate faith into their aftercare programs.

Often after you have completed rehab, you join either AA or NA. The emotional support that you find during group meetings is beneficial to staying sober once you are in the world again. Speaking with peers who have been through the same situation will help in avoiding relapse.

 

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Faith-Based Addiction Treatment vs. Standard Treatment

The difference between faith-based addiction treatment and standard treatment is the addition of faith and faith-based activities.

In faith-based addiction treatment, you will see that worship is a part of your recovery plan. Spaces for prayer are available on-site, and there are typically religious services. Often scripture readings, discussions, and meditations occur daily.

In one study, for people interested in religion, a faith-based activity could be helpful in treatment. Combining a supervised detox and mental health counseling with faith-based addiction treatment can be extremely effective. Not only are the physical and medical aspects being taken care of, but the mental and spiritual aspects are too.

More than 800 faith-based community programs receive SAMHSA grants to help those of faith beat their addictions.

Who is a Candidate for Faith-Based Addiction Treatment?

You are a good candidate for faith-based addiction treatment if you have a specific faith and want to incorporate faith in treatment.

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Examples of Faith-Based Addiction Treatment Curriculum

  • The Struggle of Sin: In this, you will understand sin and view your addiction as such. You gain a better understanding of your disease.
  • The Grace of God: If your faith involves God, then you will be able to use scripture to understand God’s grace. It will also allow you to learn how to free yourself from addiction.
  • Empowerment of Faith: This can be a special subject. When you read scripture, you articulate what faith means to you and how it empowers you.
  • The Importance of Honesty: The first step in recovery is honesty with yourself. You will need to admit to yourself that you have an addiction. Understand your addiction and apply biblical teachings.
  • Prayer and meditation: Because these are both essential to spirituality, you will learn how to pray and meditate to aid your recovery process.

Faith-Based Addiction Treatment Pathfinders - The hands of a group of people who are in prayer during their faith based addiction treatment.

Signs You Have an Addiction

There are many different signs of addiction. Although it may be hard to admit it to yourself, this is the first step in the recovery process. Here are signs that you have an addiction:

  • You keep taking prescription drugs after you no longer need them.
  • You have developed a tolerance to the drug and need more to get the same effect.
  • You feel bad when you no longer have the drug in your system. You may feel depressed or nauseous, get headaches, or sweat excessively. Often these symptoms can lead to seizures if not controlled.
  • When you cannot stop yourself from using the drug, even though you want to, you may have quit many times but are still using.
  • Addiction is affecting your social relationships, as well as your mental or physical health.
  • You think about how to get more of the drug. You feel bad after taking the drug.
  • You struggle with limiting how much you take of the drug. You may say that you will only use it so often, but you are using it more than planned.
  • You have lost interest in things you once loved to do, such as spending time with family or friends.
  • You are no longer able to perform daily tasks that were previously in your routine.
  • You drive or operate machinery while intoxicated.
  • You have needed to borrow or steal money to pay for your addiction.
  • You do not let others know about your drug use, and you feel embarrassed by your use.
  • You are having trouble getting along with your family, friends, or coworkers. The people in your life are complaining that you act differently or have changed due to your use.
  • You are encountering insomnia or oversleeping disorders. Your sleeping and eating habits have changed.
  • You have specific friends with who you typically use drugs or drink alcohol. You go to different places than normal to use or drink.
  • You have gone “doctor shopping” to obtain prescriptions for the same drug from different doctors.
  • Often look in your friend’s or family’s medicine cabinets to find drugs.
  • You take prescribed medication with alcohol or other drugs to increase their effects.

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Is It Time for You to Get Help for Your Addiction?

If you are someone of faith and want help with your addiction, consider faith-based addiction treatment.

At Pathfinders, we offer inpatient and outpatient faith-based treatment programs.

Regardless of your religion, you can find a program that shares your faith and meets your spiritual needs.

We also offer free insurance verification for treatment to help you in finding the right program.

Contact us today for more information.

How to Tell Your Family You Need Help for Drugs

Admitting You Need Help for Drugs Can Be Challenging

If you have been struggling with drug abuse, admitting you need help can be difficult, especially when approaching people you love, including your family.

The shame and stigma surrounding drug abuse and addiction can make you fearful of reaching out or admitting to your family that you have become a “drug addict.”

While it is normal to be anxious about telling others you need help for drugs, it is important to have open conversations with family, so they can be a source of support as you seek rehab.

Hopefully, through an honest, heartfelt conversation, your family will understand that treatment can help you recover from drug abuse and lead a happier, healthier life.

How to ask for help with drugs Pathfinders - Photo of a mans hands as he holds a lighter under a spoon with white powder in it as he sucks the smoke through a straw.Doing Your Research Allows You to Explain Why You Need Help for Drugs

The first step in explaining to your family that you need help with drugs is researching what addiction means.

This can help you have an educated discussion with your family, so they know you are serious about seeking treatment.

For example, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, addiction is a mental illness and a chronic brain disease.

Over time, drug use causes lasting changes in the brain, leading people to seek drugs compulsively .

Therefore, it can be extremely difficult to stop using on your own.

When you approach your family to tell them you need help with drugs, it is helps to explain that addiction is a disease.

Just like any other medical condition, treatment is required to recover or get better.

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Explain the Science of Why You Need Help for Drugs

If you have been living with addiction, there is a chance that your family is upset with you. Perhaps you have lashed out at them in anger during the worst phases of your addiction, or perhaps you have stolen money from them to support your habit. Whatever the case, your family may see you as a “hopeless drug addict.”

There is a chance that your family is fed up with your drug abuse and are convinced that drug rehab will not work. If you suspect your family might feel this way, explain to them that your behavior results from a chronic brain condition. For example, as the National Institute on Drug Abuse explains, while the initial choice to use drugs is voluntary, over time, drug abuse damages areas of the brain responsible for judgment and decision-making.

This means that addiction can make it difficult for you to control your behavior or make reasonable decisions. During the conversation with your family, it is beneficial to explain this fact.  Apologize for the decisions you made while addicted, and make it clear that you need help with drugs to make better choices in the future.

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Other Talking Points When You Need Help for Drugs

Beyond explaining to your family that addiction is a legitimate medical condition that requires treatment because of its negative effects on the brain, it is helpful to educate your family about the prevalence of addiction and the effectiveness of addiction rehab.

A 2017 report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration shows that about 20.2 million adults have an addiction in any given year. Pointing this fact out can help your family understand that addiction is a common condition and that seeking drug rehab is a relatively acceptable thing. It may also be helpful to explain that treatment works and can help you to change your life.

Explain the Dangers of Not Seeking Treatment When You Need Help for Drugs

If your family is still hesitant about drug rehab, they may become more open to the idea when you explain the dangers of not seeking treatment. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the drug overdose death rate has tripled since 1999.

Avoiding going to treatment when you need help for drugs can increase your risk of death from an overdose. Not seeking treatment also puts you at risk of a multitude of health problems, including heart disease, cancer, stroke, and mental health problems.

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Explaining What Treatment Will Involve

Beyond understanding the science and consequences of drug abuse, it will be important for your family to know what to expect from drug rehab. They can understand whether you are going to inpatient rehab or attending drug rehab on an outpatient basis.
Additionally, your family should understand that they are an important part of your recovery journey. They may be upset about your addiction or unsure that you need help for drugs, but asking them to support you in your recovery is an important step.

How to ask for help with drugs Pathfinders - A young man stands up with his family around him and tells them about his drug addiction and asks for help getting into drug rehab.Takeaways on Telling Your Family You Need Help for Drugs

Telling your family, you need help for drugs and need to go to drug rehab can be challenging. Given the stigma and shame surrounding having a drug addict in the family, your loved ones may have a negative opinion of addiction treatment.
Some of the stigma surrounding drug abuse can be corrected by developing an understanding of addiction, such as learning that addiction is a legitimate medical condition that causes lasting changes in the brain.

Explaining that addiction is a lasting brain condition, informing your family of the benefits of treatment, and asking for their support as you go to drug rehab can make a difference. Letting them know the reasons you need help for drugs and telling them what to expect will increase the chances that your family will support you.

Drug Abuse Treatment in Colorado and Arizona

If you are ready to seek treatment for drug abuse, Pathfinders Recovery Center has locations in both Colorado and Arizona. We are a luxury treatment center, and we offer a range of services, including residential treatment, outpatient rehab, detox, and partial hospitalization.

Pathfinders Recovery Center employs a leadership team with over 25 years of experience in the field, and we use evidence-based approaches for drug rehab. We are also considered a dual diagnosis center, meaning we are qualified to treat both addiction and mental illness.

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Paying for Drug Rehab

After telling your family you need help with drugs, your next concern may be determining how to pay for drug rehab.

At Pathfinders Recovery Center, we make the process easier by offering a free insurance verification program.

Simply fill out a form on our website, and a member of our team will be in touch with you to inform you what you can expect to pay out-of-pocket for rehab.

If you do not have insurance, our team will also work with you to create a cash payment plan.

Reach out to us today to learn how we can help you recover from drug abuse.

Methamphetamine: How Bad Is It?

How Bad Is Methamphetamine?

Methamphetamine is a stimulant drug with a widespread reputation for causing serious harm.

But does the drug deserve this reputation? Is it as bad as people say?

The simple answer to this question is yes.

Methamphetamine (also known as meth, crystal, glass, ice, and speed) can damage your health in many different ways.

One of its most well-known risks is addiction.

People who use the drug often can easily end up in an addictive cycle that is difficult to break.

But even if you do not get addicted, abuse of the drug can damage your mental and physical well-being. In a worst-case scenario, it can also kill you.

But rest assured, you are not doomed to suffer these kinds of tragic outcomes.

If you are abusing meth or addicted to the drug, you can break free with help from trained professionals.

No matter how hopeless you feel today, effective meth rehab will help you turn things around.

Methamphetamine: How Bad Is It? Pathfinders - A young man is sitting with an addiction specialist for an initial assessment to determine the appropriate, customized treatment plan for his methamphetamine addiction.

Methamphetamine Abuse

In the U.S., some people use a legally prescribed form of methamphetamine. However, the majority of users consume an illegal form of the drug. Any recreational form of drug use automatically qualifies as substance abuse. You can also abuse legal meth if you:

  • Take it without having a prescription
  • Consume it more often or in larger amounts than your doctor prescribed

Mental Impact of Abuse

Even without considering addiction, abuse of the drug can lead to serious mental health consequences. The worst of these consequences tend to affect long-term users. They include such things as:

  • Unusual outbursts of aggression or violence
  • Memory problems
  • Unpredictable mood changes
  • A reduced ability to focus attention
  • Problems thinking logically

But these are not the only potential effects. Some people also develop psychosis, a problem generally associated with serious illnesses like schizophrenia. Not all examples of psychosis are the same. However, its most typical symptoms include:

  • Paranoid and/or delusional thoughts
  • Sensory hallucinations
  • Involuntary, repeated muscle movements

 

It would be bad enough if you only experienced psychosis during active periods of drug use. However, for some people, the situation is far worse. Even after they quit taking methamphetamine, they still go through psychotic episodes. These episodes can continue to appear for years in some cases.

Physical Impact of Abuse

Over time, the drug can also seriously impact your physical health. For example, meth can change the structure of your brain. This fact helps explain at least some of the mental problems linked to the drug. In some cases, meth-related brain damage is permanent. Long-term users may also experience serious or permanent damage to their:

  • Hearts
  • Lungs
  • Kidneys
  • Liver

Another potential impact is extremely high blood pressure. In turn, this problem can lead to fatal strokes or heart attacks.

Even with all of this, there are more physical problems linked to the drug. One of these problems is advanced dental damage, often known as “meth mouth.” Common symptoms of meth mouth include:

  • Decaying teeth
  • Stained or discolored teeth
  • Diseased gums
  • Pain in your jaw’s joints and muscles

Because of changes in their diet, many long-term users are malnourished and lose lots of weight. You may also develop itchy skin, and some people scratch with enough force to cause significant skin damage.

 

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Methamphetamine Addiction

Methamphetamine shares a major danger with the stimulants cocaine and amphetamine. Namely, it can serve as a powerful source of drug addiction. Addiction happens when your brain comes to depend on the drug, and you feel compelled to seek it out.

When you started using crystal, you almost certainly had no interest in getting addicted. Instead, you turned to the drug because you wanted, in your way, to feel better. Nevertheless, every time you get high, your chances of addiction go up.

In fact, compared to amphetamine and cocaine, meth may pose an even greater risk. This is true, in part, because the drug produces stronger feelings of pleasure. In addition, its effects do not last for long. Together, these two facts increase the odds you will try to get high repeatedly, even in short spans of time. This is a custom-made recipe for the rapid production of drug addiction.

 

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Mental Illness

On its own, meth addiction is a form of a mental illness called stimulant use disorder. However, people who abuse methamphetamine also have higher risks for other kinds of mental illness. In addition to schizophrenia, the list of potential conditions includes:

  • Bipolar disorders
  • BPD or borderline personality disorder
  • Major depression and other depressive illnesses
  • Antisocial personality disorder
  • Anxiety-related conditions, like generalized anxiety disorder

This does not necessarily mean that your drug problems led to your other mental health problems. This may be true for some people. However, there are many possible explanations for your situation. For example, you may have developed a mental illness before you got involved in substance abuse. Still, the overall danger is clear. People who abuse drugs or alcohol are affected by mental illness at an unusually high rate.

 

Methamphetamine Overdose

Like a wide range of other substances, crystal and other forms of meth can trigger an overdose. Why? Because they have the potential to overwhelm your system and stop it from working as it should. The drug causes about 15% of all fatal overdoses in the U.S. Some people die as a result of a stroke. Others die from heart attacks. You are especially at risk if you also abuse an opioid drug or medication.

 

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Meaningful Treatment is Available

Given all of these dangers, it is easy to see methamphetamine is as bad as experts say. However, this does not mean that problems related to the drug are untreatable. There are effective ways to recover from addiction and make a substantial return to health. This fact holds true regardless of how long you have abused meth or been addicted.

The best possible way to stop abusing the drug is to enter a supervised detox program. Detox will give you the tools to halt your substance use and cope with meth-related withdrawal. These tools include forms of care, such as:

  • Making sure you get enough fluids
  • Taking steps to improve your nutritional health
  • Tracking your heart rate and other vital signs

Once you get the drug out of your system, you can start active rehab. Drug rehab for methamphetamine is based on the use of behavioral therapy. That is the name for therapy that helps you make major changes in your everyday behavior. Such changes include:

  • Understanding why you get drug cravings
  • Recognizing the signals of an increase in your desire to get high
  • Coping with your urges and remaining drug-abstinent

Methamphetamine: How Bad Is It? Pathfinders - A group of individuals attending a residential rehab for methamphetamine addiction is engaging in a group therapy session, where they are showing their support for new group members that have recently entered treatment for meth abuse.

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Seek Methamphetamine Treatment Today

Meth can leave you feeling so damaged that recovery seems almost impossible.

But no matter how convinced you are, the facts do not support this point of view.

Every day, people are affected by the drug enter treatment programs.

And once in treatment, they take the steps needed to make a return to sobriety more than just a dream.

Without a doubt, it can be challenging to overcome a methamphetamine problem.

But you do have options for moving forward.

Need help getting started? Just contact the professionals at Pathfinders.

We specialize in supporting the recovery needs of people just like you.

With our assistance, sobriety is within reach.

Construction Workers Among the Most Susceptible to Opioid Abuse

Opioid Abuse in Construction Workers

Because it is such a physically demanding profession, opioid abuse rates tend to be higher among construction workers.

The profession often has high rates of occupational injuries and back and musculoskeletal pain.

Research in this area has revealed increased mortality rates from opioid overdoses in this professional category and five others.

Further, 57% of opioid-related overdose deaths occurred after a work injury, and an additional 13% had suffered a work injury within three years of death.

This profession is fraught with hazards.

But the professionals at Pathfinders can help break the link between construction work and the dangers of opioid abuse.

Construction Workers Among the Most Susceptible to Opioid Abuse Pathfinders - A construction worker is in intense physical pain after experiencing an injury on the job, which has led to the prescription of opioids to reduce his pain. Often, this leads to opioid abuse for those in this physically-demanding industry.

Dangers of Opioid Abuse

For mild pains like headaches and moderate muscle aches, you may find that relying on over-the-counter pain relief is enough.

But when you have severe or persistent pain from a repetitive stress injury, a muscle strain, or a fall, it may not be enough.

Your doctor may suggest an opioid pain reliever instead.

You may end up buying opioids elsewhere if you cannot get a prescription to ease the pain.

While they are effective at treating severe and persistent pains, these narcotic pain relievers are addictive.

They have troubling side effects that become worse with long-term use.

And if it is the only thing you have found that eases your pain, opioid abuse becomes nearly inevitable.

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Common Prescription Opioids

Opioids work by blocking pain receptors in your brain and spinal cord.

Essentially, they trick your brain into thinking that you are not in pain anymore.

Opioids have been used for decades by medical professionals to treat moderate to severe pains.

But, because they are also known to be addictive and strong, they are prescribed more sparingly now than they have ever been before.

Doctors often require that a patient exhaust less dangerous alternative pain relief methods first. They may want to see that a patient does not respond to other pain relievers before writing a prescription.

However, this is not always enough to avoid opioid abuse.

Some of the most common prescription opioids include:

  • Vicodin (Hydrocodone)
  • OxyContin / Percocet (Oxycodone)
  • Morphine (Kadian / Avinza)
  • Codeine
  • Fentanyl

Heroin is another common and dangerous opioid. However, heroin does not come in a prescription. Heroin is an illicit drug that lacks any approved medical uses.

And while morphine does come as a prescription and in monitored medical settings, it is more often obtained through illicit means.

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Prescription Opioid Abuse vs. Illicit Opioid Abuse

Whether prescription or illicit, opioids relieve pain and promote feelings of euphoria.

These are two of the qualities that make them so addictive.

Opioid abuse can quickly lead to a variety of complications.

Opioid addictions and related accidents are common, and heroin-related overdose deaths have been rising since 2007.

One of the biggest problems with prescription opioid abuse is that it often leads to heroin abuse.

Heroin produces similar but stronger and faster effects. It is the natural next step for many people when they find that they have built a tolerance to prescription opioids and need something more.

This method of pain relief and illicit drug abuse comes with its own unique set of problems.

Put an end to your opioid abuse before it becomes something more.

And if it already has, we can help with that too.

Different Ways that Opioid Addiction Starts

Prescription use often evolves into opioid abuse quickly.

As your body builds a tolerance, you will find that the opioid’s effects begin to fade faster. This leads many people to increase their dosages, frequencies, combine opioids with other substances, or otherwise abuse their prescriptions.

Most prescription opioids, when taken correctly, are swallowed.

When opioids are abused, they are often dissolved, injected, or snorted. These methods force a faster or more potent result that often shortens the time between abuse and dependence.

Opioids should only be taken according to a prescription and under the supervision of a medical professional.

Most opioid prescriptions are short-term. But, this rule is difficult to enforce and is rarely adhered to.

Trading drugs or purchasing another person’s prescription opioids is another way an opioid addiction may start.

Most individuals in opioid addiction treatment began with a prescription.

Whatever the reason for your evolution to opioid abuse, our opioid addiction treatment programs can help.

Early Withdrawal Symptoms After Opioid Abuse

Opioid withdrawal symptoms are one of the most common reasons that individuals experience a  relapse.

Your withdrawal symptoms may vary depending on many individual factors. For instance, the opioid you use, method, frequency, length of time, and body weight can all alter your symptoms.

The way you metabolize and withdraw from drugs may not be the same way that someone else does.

Most opioid withdrawal symptoms are uncomfortable or mildly painful.

However, more serious complications are possible.

Early opioid withdrawal symptoms may include:

  • Agitation or anxiety
  • Muscle aches
  • Insomnia
  • Increased sweating and yawning
  • Runny nose

What Happens Next

As you progress through your withdrawals, you may later experience:

  • Abdominal cramps
  • Dilated pupils
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

If you have attempted to quit using opioids on your own but have relapsed due to withdrawal symptoms, drug cravings, or another obstacle, our medically-assisted drug detox can help.

This highly-specialized and monitored detox method is designed to help with even the worst withdrawal symptoms.

Our detoxes occur in a safe, comfortable, and monitored space.

They ease your withdrawal symptoms and cravings so that you can move forward.

They help enforce early sobriety, eliminate distractions, and restore your strength and motivation.

It is time to let this vital stage of your recovery journey place you firmly on the right path.

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Opioid Addiction Treatment Options

When it comes to effective opioid addiction treatment, there is no singular solution that works for everyone.

Depending on your unique addiction, needs, mental health, and other individual factors, we will work with you to build the treatment program that will be the most beneficial to you.

We will help you choose between residential rehab, intensive outpatient rehab, or a supplemental care program that lands somewhere in the middle.

A partial hospitalization program would be one example of this. This type of program is ideal for individuals battling a dual diagnosis with unpredictable symptoms.

Most patients in recovery for opioid addictions will begin with a residential program before transitioning into a more flexible care plan.

Residential rehab programs last from 30 days to over a year, depending on your needs, progress, and preferences.

These care programs offer high-level, specialized, and customized 24-hour care. You will have all of the care, support, and guidance you will need through each stage of your recovery.

Our various therapies, relapse prevention training, support groups, and holistic remedies will help you address, evaluate, and overcome your addiction and the complications stemming from it.

Construction Workers Among the Most Susceptible to Opioid Abuse Pathfinders - A construction worker who entered a residential drug rehab for opioid abuse is sharing his story on opioid abuse and addiction as part of a group therapy session during his recovery process.

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Pathfinders Recovery Center

Choosing Pathfinders means choosing a better way.

It means customized care plans, incredible support systems, and life-long learning opportunities.

It means commitment and dedication to a healthy, sustainable, and sober life.

You have it within you to turn the tables on your addiction.

You just need a little bit of help to get you there.

Let us guide you the same way we have guided so many others before you.

Call us today at 855-728-4363 for more information.

Drug Use and Addiction Among High-Earning Professionals

Drug Rehab

In recent years, we have seen many high-earning professionals enroll in a drug rehab program.

Drug abuse affects individuals across different ages, genders, locations, and socioeconomic statuses.

Individuals on the high-earning and low-earning sides have unique risk factors.

High-earning professionals often appear to have large social circles, but many feel that these circles are shallow.

They rarely offer the same benefits as smaller circles of quality friendships do.

Feelings of isolation are common drivers of drug abuse.

At Pathfinders, we will help you overcome these feelings and build healthy, effective support systems.

Drug Use and Addiction Among High Earning Professionals Pathfinders - A group of individuals in drug rehab show support for one another by discussing their stories, coping strategies, and treatment successes.

Drug Abuse Risk Factors

In this particular demographic, isolation is one of the most significant risk factors for drug abuse.

It can be challenging to juggle building quality friendships and familial relationships and to build a rewarding career.

However, isolation is not the only link to consider.

Other risk factors for high earning professionals include high-stress work environments, increased career pressures, and an overwhelming need or demand to focus on work.

But for many people, the risk for drug abuse begins much sooner than their career.

This is particularly true for alcohol and marijuana abuse.

The use of these two substances in young adulthood was associated with higher childhood family socioeconomic statuses.

Early exposure, genetic predisposition, and underlying mental health disorders are some of the most pressing risk factors in any demographic.

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Drug Abuse Costs vs. Drug Rehab Costs

It can be difficult to anticipate individual drug rehab costs.

This is particularly true in addiction treatment programs like ours because they are customized to fit the individual’s needs.

The high level of customization we offer makes it difficult to provide cookie-cutter pricing sheets.

Your drug rehab costs will vary depending on your needs, and your health insurance provider may cover the full program.

You can call our addiction counselor at any time for complimentary insurance verification.

If you do not have insurance, we can help you build a payment plan conveniently and affordably breaks down your addiction treatments.

But while individual costs are difficult to identify, we do know what substance abuse costs the nation annually.

Yearly, substance abuse costs more than $740 billion in criminal matters, lost work productivity, and healthcare.

Each of these costs can negatively affect your life, family, community, and country as a whole.

However, addiction treatment care costs are preferable to the financial, emotional, and physical costs of long-term drug abuse.

Addiction is powerful, complex, and costly in many different ways.

Our drug rehab programs can help you regain control.

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Drug Rehab for High-Earning Professionals

Drug abuse alters your brain chemistry, changing your thoughts and behaviors.

It also worsens existing mental health disorders and leads to new ones.

Each of these factors makes it difficult to quit on your own.

Additionally, stress and anxiety are some of the major drivers of drug abuse.

This is one of several reasons why high-earning professionals are at risk.

Some of these professions include:

  • Emergency room doctors
  • Psychologists and psychiatrists
  • Other medical professionals
  • Attorneys

Professionals in these categories and categories like these face additional pressures and high-stress situations that professionals in other careers are not exposed to.

These stresses and pressures may lead to recreational drug use, drug abuse as a coping mechanism, or drug abuse as a way to silence the symptoms of an underlying mental health disorder.

But because drugs impair the parts of your brain that control your motivation, memory, mood, and other important functions, they can lead to severe mental and physical health problems.

Let our drug rehab help you avoid these problems by addressing your addictions and mental health disorders early and ongoing during your recovery process.

Drug Rehab for Withdrawals

Drug withdrawal symptoms and cravings can make it difficult to end your drug addiction.

For this reason, many people relapse when they try to quit at home.

Often, drug withdrawal symptoms will lead to relapse before the drug is even out of the body.

If you recognize this challenging process, we are here to help.

Our medically-assisted drug detox, performed in our comfortable, safe facility, eliminates distractions and opportunities for relapse.

They offer 24-hour access to medical care, support, and guidance so that you can focus on your recovery.

Certain approved medications may be used to ease your withdrawal symptoms and cancel out drug cravings.

This enforcement of early sobriety increases your chances of success as you progress through your program.

Give yourself a strong start and a healthy, sober ending.

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Alcoholism Among High-Earning Professionals

Like the trends we see with certain drugs, many high-earning professionals abuse alcohol as well. This may be done to keep up in social circles, cope with mental health disorder symptoms, or ease stress.

Whatever the reason your drinking began, you are not alone.

About 18 million American adults have an alcohol use disorder.

Alcoholism has several drivers, some of which are more obvious than others.

Among them, some of the most common are genetics, stress, and depression.

This is a common and treatable addiction.

And it is one that often co-exists with drug addiction.

If you are battling multiple addictions or a dual diagnosis – addiction and a mental health disorder – we have highly specialized drug rehab programs available.

You do not have to face this alone.

Trust the dedicated experts at Pathfinders to help you through. Give yourself a strong start and a healthy, sober ending.

Drug Rehab Options

At Pathfinders, we understand that your drug rehab needs may not reflect the needs of the patients who came before you.

This is one reason why we offer a variety of customizable treatment programs and settings to choose from.

There are no one-size-fits-all solutions here.

Our comprehensive care settings include:

If you have a moderate to severe addiction or multiple addictions, we will likely recommend an inpatient or residential rehab stay.

Partial hospitalization programs are ideal for those with addictions and mental health disorders that are difficult to control.

And, intensive outpatient programs offer care for those with milder addictions. This program has the most flexible time requirements.

However, you do not have to worry about choosing a program on your own.

We will work with you to build the treatment plan that will benefit you the most.

Drug Use and Addiction Among High Earning Professionals Pathfinders - A man in a high-earning professional career is entering a drug rehab for his drug addiction and abuse issues, and he is speaking with a rehab facilitator to determine the appropriate, customized treatment plan for his specific needs.

 

Comprehensive Care Treatment Methods

Among the different time requirements and benefits, one thing remains the same across these settings: high-level, specialized, and customized care is key.

Our luxurious facilities offer safe spaces. Our teams provide individualized and dedicated services. Our knowledge, support, and guidance will stay with you for as long as you need them to.

We will give you everything you need for a well-balanced and focused recovery from various therapies and support groups to creative and holistic remedies.

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Pathfinders’ Drug Rehab

The friendly and knowledgeable team at each Pathfinders facility has helped countless individuals change their lives.

With incredible and comfortable facilities and compassionate and dedicated professionals, we are the preferred addiction treatment provider.

We will give you what you need through each stage of your recovery.

We will monitor and evaluate your progress to ensure that you are always moving forward.

You do not have to face this alone. And, you do not have to suffer in silence.

Call us today at 855-728-4363 to see how we can help.

How Addictive is Kratom? This is What You Should Understand

How Addictive is Kratom – It can Replace an Opiate Addiction.

Kratom is a hope-inspiring substance for many struggling addicts.

It can help life-long opiate addicts quit their painful addictions and save their lives. It’s safer, more natural, and above-all-else a smarter choice than most opiates.

But kratom is an addictive substance itself. Sometimes it merely replaces one addiction with another.

Like any other drug, it’s not without its drawbacks!

This begs the question: How addictive is kratom? And what do you do if you find yourself addicted? Keep reading to find the answer.

How Addictive is Kratom - Supplement kratom green capsules and powder on brown plate. Learn about the treatment options for Kratom at Pathfinders in Arizona.
Supplement kratom green capsules and powder on brown plate. Herbal product alt-medicine kratom is opioid.

Why Do People Use Kratom?

Kratom is meant to be used as an alternative to opiates. People suffering from opiate addiction sometimes turn to kratom to get off the more deadly opiate.

The drug provides similar effects and gives users relief from withdrawal symptoms in a safer way.

Kratom is more natural than a processed opiate like heroin. Its leaves can be eaten, brewed, or taken in pills. This makes it easy for anyone to take.

Some doctors are wary when it comes to recommending kratom, though.

Some patients get carried away with kratom and end up replacing their opiate addiction with it, rather than using it to ween themselves into sobriety.

While kratom is natural, it still gives a user the same effects as opiates, meaning it’s just as tempting for a seasoned addict to abuse.

How Addictive Is Kratom?

Taking any mind-altering drug, including kratom, changes the brain’s natural chemistry.

Kratom fills opioid receptors in the brain, giving users a rush or high similar to heroin.

Like other opiates, your body can become used to these highs and start to crave them. The brain adjusts to the opiate and comes to expect them.

Without giving the brain what it wants, a user can experience symptoms of withdrawal and adverse effects on their health.

Some symptoms of kratom withdrawal include:

  • insomnia
  • irritability
  • aggression
  • aching muscles
  • jerky movements

Measuring “how” addictive a substance is is difficult, and really depends on the person. Some people have more addictive personalities than others.

Although, no matter what your personality, addiction can happen to anyone.

Kratom addiction is on the rise. Kratom is openly sold in most states. This means curious teens can easily buy it for recreational use rather than for opiate recovery.

It should not be assumed that kratom is any less addictive than any other opiate. It’s simply better for you, and less likely to be tainted or end a user’s life.

With any drug comes the risk of addiction, whether it’s something common like caffeine, or more uncommon like kratom.

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What Makes Kratom Addictive?

Kratom is addictive for the same reason any opiate is. Opiates offer a user euphoria, relaxation, and psychoactive effects. They give the user a high that is hard to find in other drugs.

If a user suffers from depression they may become especially hooked on the feeling that opiates give. Opiates tend to mask pain both physical and mental, which is a desirable state for many.

Kratom is an interesting opiate. In lower doses, it offers stimulating and energizing effects. In higher doses it relaxes the body, making you sleepy, euphoric, and relaxed.

This means users can get addicted to kratom as either a stimulant or a relaxant. Other opiates are much harder to control on this level, giving kratom an interesting up-side for opiate lovers.

Many people start using kratom on a doctor’s recommendation. In this case, the doctor will usually tell the patient what dosage to take. But this isn’t always the case, and not everyone follows orders.

Some people will start using kratom on their own to deal with their addiction, or simply for recreational purposes. This is always more dangerous, as the user is given no solid guidelines.

There is no doctor to monitor how the user is adjusting to the drug or to recommend a safe dosage.

Like any other drug, kratom is addictive because it feels good to take. Plus, it’s cheaper than opiates, natural, widely legal, and more versatile.

Can You Overdose on Kratom?

There have been several reports of kratom overdoses. The majority of these overdoses involved mixing other drugs, such as cocaine, fentanyl, and alcohol.

Because of this, it’s uncertain how much of a factor kratom was.

However, a small number of kratom overdoses only involved the use of kratom. This could have been due to the user dosing too high, or buying a laced product.

Buying kratom for recreational use always runs the risk of ingesting unknown, harmful substances.

So, while you’re not likely to overdose on kratom, the official stance is unknown. More studies must be put into the subject, and more cases must be investigated.

Always be careful where you buy your kratom from, and only purchase from designated dealers with trusted backgrounds.

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How Many People Use Kratom?

Kratom use has risen in recent years. The drug remains legal in many states and countries and is fairly easy to get hold of.

Because of its abuse factor, some places have made it illegal, including Indiana, Wisconsin, and Vermont.

There has been a push to make kratom a schedule 1 drug. Schedule 1 is where the most addictive drugs are placed, including heroin and other opiates.

At the moment, kratom remains unscheduled. When it was announced that it might be scheduled there was a large outpouring of people who disagreed with the proposition.

Over 140,000 people signed a petition and got the proposition shot down.

To date, there are an estimated five million people who regularly use kratom. that’s a large portion of the population.

Many of these people use it to stay off worse opiates, and taking it away from them would risk throwing them back into their previous addictions.

The Signs of Kratom Addiction

Like any other addiction, the signs for kratom addiction can be subtle to the user but obvious to outsiders.

Signs and symptoms of addiction can vary greatly from person to person and be difficult to pinpoint. However, some of them show more than others.

How Addictive is Kratom - A man who looks tired and unkept looks into the camera. The 1st sign of kratom addiction is a change in appearance and reduction in hygiene.
A man who looks tired and unkept looks into the camera.

Dependency on kratom is the most obvious sign. If you feel the need to take kratom right once the effects have worn off, you could have a dependency.

If not getting the drug soon after its effects are gone causes irritation, mood swings, or discomfort, you could be addicted.

Spending more money than you can afford to on kratom is a sign, as well as a change in physical appearance. This means drastic weight loss or gain, or a reduction in personal hygiene.

One should also look out for irregular sleep patterns.

If you feel like you’re taking too much kratom, chances are you’re right. If your friends tell you they’re worried about your kratom use, that’s another reason to check yourself.

There’s a big difference between casual use and addiction, and it eventually shows itself.

How Is Kratom Addiction Treated?

There is no proven best way to deal with kratom addiction. But there are steps you can take to move away from addiction.

The first step is usually to decrease your use. If you’re used to taking large doses of kratom, start weaning yourself off.

Take smaller and smaller doses each time and your body will become less dependant on high doses.

The next step is to detox your body. Stop taking kratom and get all traces of the drug out of your body. Some medications can help accomplish this, as well as certain foods.

If the addiction is at an aggressive stage, rehab may be necessary. Rehabilitation centers don’t discriminate based on drugs.

Many will take kratom users just as readily as alcohol and heroin users, and help them find the environment they need to quit.

Behavioral therapy is also a big help in dealing with kratom addiction. Behavioral therapy targets a person’s triggers for addiction and looks to stop them.

It looks to rid a patient of their relapse triggers and let them know they don’t need the drug anymore.

If you suspect a loved one of being addicted to kratom talk to them about it. They may not see the signs or may be unwilling to accept them.

Intervention is an often necessary first step in squashing an addiction, even if it is an uncomfortable one.

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Addiction Happens

The simple answer to the question “How addictive is kratom?” is this: Just as addictive as any other opiate.

Just because something is natural doesn’t mean it’s good for you. Kratom has its upsides, but it also has its downsides.

Like any other substance, it’s important to moderate your use and fight against dependance.

If you or someone you love may be addicted to kratom, get the help you need.

Talk to them, seek rehab, and get the drug out of your system. You’ll be happy you did it in the end.

If you’re looking for a trusted rehabilitation center, see what we can do for you. Contact us with any comments, questions, or concerns.

We’d be happy to help.