Does Cocaine Cause Hair Loss?

Does cocaine cause hair loss concept pic

Investigating the Side Effects of Cocaine

Many people are already familiar with the side effects that often accompany a cocaine addiction. They know how to look for the physical symptoms or withdrawal and the mental health disorders that can sometimes accompany drug use. However, there are also several lesser-known side effects of cocaine that you should be on the lookout for: namely, does cocaine cause hair loss?

Pathfinders Recovery Center is determined to help you combat drug addiction. If you or a loved one is experiencing some of the symptoms associated with illegal drugs, we can customize a treatment plan specifically for you.

Cocaine and Hair Loss: What’s the Connection?

The truth is that you might experience hair fallout from extended cocaine use. Drug abuse can impact the body in unexpected ways, and this is often one of them. Cocaine can halt hair growth in a number of different ways as well as contribute to hair that falls out before it is truly ready.

Let’s take a closer look at what you can expect from the hair growth cycle when you use substances like cocaine. These lesser-known side effects can take a real toll on your body and here’s how they work.

Lack of Nutrition Leads to Hair Loss

Lack of Nutrition Leads to Hair Loss

In order to understand hair loss with cocaine addiction, it is important to note some of the other symptoms you will experience. The physical repercussions of drug abuse are serious. Perhaps one of the easiest symptoms to spot is a lack of appetite or rapid weight loss. When you stop consuming a well-balanced diet, you are depriving your body of needed nutrients.

Of course, there are other issues that stem from cocaine use as well. For example, your body is unable to absorb the nutrients that you do take in, however minimal these may be. Combined, these nutritional deficiencies make it less likely that your body will be able to generate healthy hair growth.

The body will prioritize its most important functions when nutrition is ignored. That means that it goes toward repairing the body, keeping organs functioning, and more. The last place that these precious nutrients will go is your hair growth. It simply is not a necessary function, and your recreational drug use is to blame for the hair loss you experience.

Stress-Induced Hair Loss with Substance Abuse

While lack of nutrition makes hair growth a challenge, hair loss is just as common due to the stress of cocaine use. Hair loss is common following a radical change to the body’s system, such as that caused by cocaine usage. Any time you use crack cocaine or other recreational drugs, you start to induce stress-related hair loss.

Combine this stress to the bodily systems with your poor nutrition and you have a recipe for disaster when it comes to your hair.

Unfortunately, you might struggle with even more hair loss when you decide to give up your crack cocaine usage. Getting the drug out of your system is equally stressful, both mentally and physically. As a result, you might find that your hair loss gets a little bit worse before it starts to improve.

If you notice that your hair is thinning or you have difficulty with hair regrowth, it could be a sign that your cocaine use is taking a toll on your body. It moves from invisible to visible fairly quickly, especially as far as your temporary hair loss is concerned. Reach out for help if you want to get through the early days of sobriety and start to get your hair healthy again.

Prioritizing Important Body Systems Means Hair Growth Takes a Backseat

One of the hallmarks of cocaine addiction is an interruption to normal and healthy sleep patterns. You may spend very little time asleep, and even the quality of that sleep is minimal. You need certain stages of sleep to keep the body functioning at its best.

During the rapid eye movement (REM) stage of your sleep, your body is primed to repair itself. Disrupted REM sleep means that you body has less time to focus on making the necessary repairs to important body systems. In turn, it will focus on the most important systems first.

This often means that your body will relegate hair growth or hair loss to the bottom of the list. Hair, while it may be beautiful, is not the most important thing for your body to focus on repairing when REM sleep is at a premium.

As a result, the less sleep you get, the more likely it is that you will experience substantial hair loss and have difficulty when it comes time to regrow hair.

Lack of Proper Hair Care Leads to Hair Loss

Taking hair care

One of the issues with cocaine addiction is that you tend to neglect some of the daily care activities that your body needs to be fully functioning and healthy. Personal appearance and hygiene tend to be the first things to go when you are coping with a substance use issue. To this end, you will find that your haircare routine is likely lacking.

When you stop taking care of your hair, it is only normal to find that you have hair loss or issues with regrowth of the hair follicles.

Perhaps the easiest way to minimize hair loss from taking illegal drugs is to reprioritize the daily care of your hair. Purchase quality shampoo and conditioner, making every effort to wash and care for it on a regular basis.

Will You Suffer Permanent Hair Loss Due to Cocaine Use?

If you are concerned about the connection between cocaine and hair loss, you might be wondering if anything can be done about it. Maybe you are ready to conquer your addiction once and for all but are concerned that your hair may never recover. Fortunately, most of the hair loss is only temporary.

It will take some time for your body to catch up and move toward healthy hair growth once more. You will need to maintain good nutrition, healthy sleep habits, and decrease the overall stress in your life. Taking care of your hair will also help to restore hair follicles and make it more likely that you can regrow hair that you have lost.

Cocaine use allows the body to transition into a constant state of shock where hair is the least of the body’s priorities. You can help it reestablish equilibrium by stopping your substance use and seeking treatment with a qualified rehab center.

What Does Cocaine Addiction Treatment Do for Hair Loss?

Cocaine Addiction Treatment

Through treatment for cocaine use, we will help you establish healthy habits once more including both eating balanced meals and sleeping. Both of these can have a dramatic impact on stress-induced hair loss and make it more likely that you hair will regrow. Residential treatment also keeps you sober and away from substance abuse, guiding you along the path toward healing.

In some instances, a doctor may even be able to prescribe a medication aimed at helping hair regrow. Be sure to ask your doctor if you would qualify for one of these treatments if your hair loss is particularly significant.

Getting Help for Hair Loss and Cocaine Use

Many people find that the health of their hair suffers when exposed to illegal drugs. The good news is that you can combat this lesser-known side effect with treatment at Pathfinders Recovery Center. We will start with a medical detox, allowing you to rid the body of leftover cocaine and helping you to step into your recovery.

Addressing the root cause of your hair loss is essential. Allow our team of experienced medical professionals to create a customized treatment plan that will have you looking and feeling your very best. Contact Pathfinders Recovery Center today to learn more about our treatment programs!

Meth Sores

Meth Sores

The Effect of Crystal Meth on a Person’s Health

My drug abuse finally caught up with me after over a decade of meth use. I was nearly dead when I arrived at Pathfinders to begin my recovery process. Luckily in my case, I was able to beat my meth addiction and live a normal life again.

Recovery is possible for anyone who is willing to make it work. Read more to find out how to make it work for you or someone you love. The effects of substance abuse are crippling, particularly with a drug like meth.

I began using crystal meth when I was in my early twenties and used it regularly for 12 years. One of the most obvious signs of my abuse was my meth sores. Meth is a drug that creates a lot of mental and physical symptoms. The more you use meth, the easier it is to develop meth sores.

Keep reading to find out more about meth sores, meth mites, and how to get help if you or a loved one are struggling with meth now!

What Are Meth Mites?

What Are Meth Mites

Meth does a lot of damage to a person’s skin, and meth sores can take on a variety of appearances. Meth sores, meth mites, and meth mouth are all easy ways to tell if someone is dealing with a meth addiction. I’ve suffered from all of these conditions, so I am well aware of how to spot when a person’s body has been affected by meth abuse.

Meth use disorder damages your entire body, and the signs of meth use present themselves very clearly. Meth sores form for a variety of reasons, and can typically happen in people who use meth long-term. One common occurrence is meth mites. When you engage in meth use long enough, it can cause extreme paranoia and hallucinations.

You get a crawling sensation that feels like you have bugs running around under your skin. This can cause the user to pick at the skin in order to try and get rid of these imaginary bugs. For someone who hasn’t used meth, this sounds like a living nightmare and it absolutely is.

What Does Meth Do To Your Mind?

When I would smoke crystal meth, I would stay awake for days on end. when you suffer from sleep deprivation, you actually begin to dream while you are awake. Consistent meth use can cause users to stay awake for weeks at a time.

This is an extremely dangerous and life-threatening situation. The body needs sleep to stay regular. Sleep deprivation can lead to a weakened immune system, minor infections, and poor blood flow.

Usually, when you are in the middle of a meth addiction, you aren’t going to seek medical treatment for these issues. Consistent meth abuse will only make the skin-picking and meth mites continue.

Other Forms Of Meth Sores

Other Forms Of Meth Sores

Meth mites aren’t the only way that one can develop meth sores. If you smoke crystal meth, the heat from the pipe can cause burns around your mouth. These types of meth sores typically don’t heal very quickly, particularly for meth users who smoke it on a regular basis.

When I was abusing meth, my lips were in a constant state of being cracked and burned. I also suffered from meth mouth, which is a result of the damage done to your teeth and gums caused by long-term meth use. Cold sores were another common form of meth sore for me.

Meth and Your Skin

Unhealthy skin is a common trait among meth users as well. Meth users tend to sweat at a higher rate, and because meth is water-soluble, it comes out through your pores. This irritates the skin and can be another cause of meth sores. Since meth causes poor blood flow, it makes the blood vessels contract, which can lead to dry, scaly patches on the skin.

When you abuse meth, your personal hygiene suffers as well. On top of al the other things that can lead to meth sores, having poor hygiene makes it even worse. The only thing I was concerned about was getting high, so I would never treat meth sores. I had poor hygiene on a consistent basis. It’s impossible to lead a healthy and satisfying life when you engage in this kind of drug abuse.

Health Problems Associated With Methamphetamine

Beyond meth sores and skin infections, meth can do a lot of unseen damage to the body. If you have open sores on your body, which many meth users do, it can be easier to develop infections. Some people who use meth use it intravenously, which can be another cause of meth sores. Sharing needles also increases the likelihood of contracting infections such as HIV.

I lost a lot of my teeth as a result of my meth mouth, and after several very painful surgeries, I was able to save some of them. Most of my teeth are fake now. Mouth sores and damaged gums can lead to oral infections. Such infections can be very damaging and lead to a multitude of other oral issues, and these infections can spread to other parts of the body.

For some, the withdrawal symptoms from meth can be very scary. In order for your body to heal and begin to go back to normal, you have to deal with these symptoms and do your best to push through the discomfort. Withdrawal symptoms from meth include chills, intense cravings, depression, anxiety, and fatigue to name a few.

Getting Treatment For Meth Addiction

Getting Treatment For Meth Addiction

After over a decade of dealing with paranoia, hallucinations, meth bugs, and constant meth sores, I finally reached a point where I needed to try and get help. I wanted to live a healthy lifestyle, but I had no idea what that looked like. People who use meth long enough start to lose their grip on reality. You can’t imagine not using the drug. The concept of sobriety is totally foreign.

Going through my initial meth detox was the most uncomfortable feeling I can remember. Even with all of the physical issues I had during my methamphetamine abuse, the detox felt worse. After several days going through detox, I was finally able to come out on the other end of my meth withdrawal. Because meth is such a highly addictive drug, your mental health takes a big hit as a result of your addiction.

When someone stops abusing meth, it takes the brain a long time to recover. You are wired to need the drug at all times, and you have to retrain your mind in a variety of different ways. Even though I have been clean for a few years, I still seek professional treatment and put a high priority on my mental health.

Recovering From Meth Abuse Through Support Groups

Your meth sores will eventually heal, but there is long-term healing to be done in order to completely overcome methamphetamine use. The best way to approach recovery is to go all in. Being addicted to meth not only hurts you, but it can tear your family apart as well. When a loved one would address their concerns regarding my methamphetamine use, I wouldn’t listen. I did a lot of damage to the people I love because of my addiction.

I have learned to forgive myself for the way that I became, but it took a lot of behavioral therapy and constant self-awareness. I know the health risks and what stimulant abuse can lead to. Even though I am aware of the dangers, I am still not above relapsing.

The Importance of Sober Support and Social Connections

The Importance of Sober Support and Social Connections

The support group I am a part of gives me a lot of comfort and hope. I’ve met a lot of wonderful individuals through recovery, and I try to help them stay clean the same way they do it for me.

The risk of relapse is always there, but it’s not something that I allow to control me. My overall health is much better these days, and I will do whatever I have to do to not face the meth sores and the open wounds. My sobriety is the most important thing in my life, and I will do whatever I need to do to protect it. That’s what it takes.

Finding Your Path to Recovery from Meth

For anyone who is struggling to overcome meth, issues with meth sores may actually help you decide to get treatment. I know for me it became important to be able to look in the mirror and recognize myself once again. Pathfinders played a huge role in making this happen.

If you or a loved one also needs a change from a meth-fueled lifestyle, consider giving a call to Pathfinders for a confidential chat. I know it was one of the best calls I ever made, and it can be for you as well!

How to Help an Alcoholic

How to Help an Alcoholic

Helping Someone with a Drinking Problem

Alcohol and drug use not only create a lot of problems for the user but for the family members as well. I did a lot of damage to my family through my alcohol dependence, and it took a lot of healing and bridge-rebuilding in order to make up for it.

I never realized the pain I caused until I got clean. After I attended Pathfinders Recovery for treatment, I learned how to love myself again and work on the issues that caused my addiction. When does alcohol abuse become a problem? Read more to find out how to pick up on the signs you should be looking out for.

Alcohol problems are a persistent issue in our society. Alcohol is a socially acceptable drug, so it is one of the easiest substances to get hooked on. Alcoholism can lead to serious life consequences and fractured relationships. It also takes a huge toll on your mental health. There is no way to understate how alcohol affects emotional and behavioral health.

Keep reading to learn more about how to help an alcoholic, from someone who struggled themselves and is able to speak from personal experience about the programs at Pathfinders.

Don’t Enable Their Behavior

If you have an alcoholic in your family, it is easy to enable their behavior. We don’t want to push people away, so often we will try and overlook certain issues. It’s important to try and offer emotional support, but you have to set healthy boundaries about alcohol for yourself. It’s hard to watch a loved one suffer, but you have a choice in taking on that suffering. You are only in control of your own life, and you can’t fix another person’s pain.

An addicted person will often feel threatened or judged if you push them too hard. It’s a difficult issue to bring up for someone who is suffering from an alcohol problem. You can’t change a loved one’s life unless they are willing to accept that change. It’s very tricky to guide someone through the process of getting clean.

Unfortunately, not everyone who suffers from alcohol abuse will get clean. This is just a fact of life, but it doesn’t mean you have to give up. Drinking alcohol to excess can greatly affect the brain and decision-making. You have to keep this in mind when you are trying to console an addict. You never know what can set someone off and feel triggered.

Knowing the Signs of an Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD)

Knowing the Signs of an Alcohol Use Disorder

There is certain behavior that people with an alcohol addiction will exude. People’s drinking habits will eventually show that they have a problem. If someone you know often drinks to excess, and their behavior changes for the worse when they are drunk, this is the beginning of a potential issue.

Alcoholics will often lie about their drinking as well. When you’re suffering from alcohol addiction or any form of an alcohol use disorder, for that matter, you will often try to hide it at the beginning. You will eventually get really get at hiding it as well. Alcoholics will go to great lengths to hide their drinking. This dishonesty can weigh heavy on your mind.

I always felt bad about myself when I was abusing alcohol. I was constantly lying and making people think I didn’t have as big of a drinking problem as I did. My family members knew something was wrong, but I never let them get close enough to see just how bad I had gotten. Closing yourself off can create a lot more issues and make it even harder to reach out when you finally do want to get help.

Binge Drinking: The Beginning of More Problems

I began binge drinking in college, and eventually developed an alcohol use disorder that slowly got worse and worse. I would only drink at night at first, but it was every night. Then I slowly began drinking earlier and earlier. By the time I was in my late twenties, I was waking up with a beer in my hand. It felt like it happened quickly, but it didn’t. Before I knew it, I needed alcohol to get through every hour of each day.

My alcohol abuse came on slowly. This is very common with all types of substance abuse. You don’t start off as a full-blown addict. The amount gradually increases and before you know it, you need the drug just to get by. My drinking problem eventually started affecting my personal and professional life as well.

I lost more than one job because of my drinking. I worked in a restaurant at one point and got fired for stealing alcohol. Even though my boss was angry, he tried to help. He told me I had an alcohol use disorder and it would only get worse if I didn’t stop drinking. You never want to believe the obvious when you are in that position. I knew he was right, but I lied to myself and blamed others for my issues. An alcoholic will look at everyone else as the problem before themselves.

The Red Flags that Your Loved One Has a Drinking Problem

I had one family member who had overcome their alcohol abuse through rehab and support groups. They noticed that I was going down the same path, even though I believed I was doing a good job of hiding it. It was hard for me to hide my desire for alcohol. If I didn’t have booze, I was a different person. I was irritable. I didn’t want to deal with any of life’s obstacles,

The signs are always there, and they are easy to pick up on for people who have a history of alcohol dependence. My other family members didn’t see what alcohol was doing to me, but this one person who had experience with alcohol abuse saw it right away. They were careful not to push me away, but they were blunt and honest about how bleak my future would be if I didn’t seek treatment.

There is no manual for how to help an alcoholic, but we do have effective ways of preventing drug abuse and getting help. Even with prior experience being an alcoholic, you never know what the best approach is. Every addiction is unique. Because I had mental health issues, this made my addiction much more tricky. Alcohol misuse already affects your brain in a negative way, so if you have a mental health disorder, it can require a lot more work.

Understanding Alcohol Addiction

Understanding Alcohol Addiction

Dealing with a loved one’s addiction is an emotional rollercoaster. You want to help them, but you often don’t know how. There are no magic words to get someone to quit drinking. Your loved one’s behaviors can be heartbreaking and extremely difficult to accept. A codependent relationship can make things even harder to work through.

You don’t want to enable your loved one’s addiction, but you can fall into it easily. It’s easy to start making excuses for a loved one’s alcoholism. You can begin to view them as a victim. The most important thing to come to grips with is it isn’t your fault. Alcohol abuse is a personal issue and it’s up to the alcoholic to seek treatment options.

Your loved one may get angry with you if you push them too hard to seek help. The most successful way to help them is to do some research. If you understand alcohol addiction, you will be better equipped to help someone get the help they need. If you have a family member who is addicted, you should learn a little bit about the dynamics of alcohol and drug abuse.

What Not To Say to an Alcoholic Loved One

Pushing someone too hard to seek professional treatment is the wrong approach. You can lightly nudge people, but you can’t be aggressive about it. If a friend or family member has an addiction, you need to respect their journey. People who want help will get help. You can’t force anyone to go into alcohol treatment.

Tough love is important, but it needs to be done cautiously. You have to take into consideration that an alcoholic’s mental health is usually a big factor in their suffering. Substance abuse comes from somewhere, and it is often the result of people trying to cover up past trauma or pain. The key is to engage in careful conversations.

My family always stressed to me that they weren’t trying to change me, but if I was ready to change myself, I could always seek addiction treatment no matter how bad my addiction was. I always appreciated that support and let them know that after I got sober. Encouraging a loved one to get help can be uncomfortable, but it can pay off big too.

Checking Insurance Coverage for an Alcohol Rehab

There are a lot of things to navigate when you decide to seek help. Figuring out your insurance and getting financial support is one of the worries that many people in recovery deal with. You go through many major life changes when you seek treatment, and it doesn’t have to all be so overwhelming.

There are a lot of ways to find financial assistance if you aren’t in a position to afford rehab. It’s much better to try and figure those things out than just deciding to not get help because you can’t figure it out financially. A lot of times legal trouble can get in the way too.

Finding effective treatment is possible as long as you are all in on getting clean. Stay calm and remain calm. You can get through this with a good head on your shoulders. The people at Pathfinders did a great job of helping relieve stress and get me through the process as comfortably as possible.

Supporting Your Loved One’s Recovery

Supporting Your Loved One's Recovery

When a loved one is seeking professional help, it’s important to be in their corner. Alcohol abuse usually requires intensive treatment and medical supervision during a detox. Alcohol detox is one of the most uncomfortable forms of detox. Alcoholism affects the body so greatly that alcohol detox can be deadly.

My alcohol withdrawal was brutal, and the symptoms nearly broke me. Luckily, I have a great family behind me who are extremely supportive and were my cheerleaders along the way. Even after the initial detox, my alcohol cravings were intense. Alcohol use disorder takes a big toll on your mind, so addiction treatment requires a lot of support.

I was greatly encouraged during my treatment, not just by my family, but by the medical professionals who helped me while I was recovering. All of the support I received was crucial in my recovery. With all the help I got, I was able to get back into a good place and use my platform to help others the way that I was helped.

What Happens in an Alcohol Rehab Center?

When you go to treatment, you have to expect the first few days to be uncomfortable. The detox is tough, but with the right people around you, you will be able to make it through to the next step of the process. Once you get through the detox, you’ve done a lot more than other people have.

The next part of the process revolves around getting your mental health back to where it needs to be. You have to start facing all of the problems that got you to where you have gotten. Substance abuse changes your brain and you need to pay a lot of attention to rebuilding a healthy, positive attitude.

A big part of recovery is speaking to others in recovery. Support groups make a world of difference on your journey. Even when you are out of treatment, finding the right support group is very important for your continuing recovery. You don’t get out of treatment completely healed. When you attend therapy and support groups, you up your chances of long-term recovery.

Avoid Bringing Alcohol into the Home

Developing coping mechanisms is crucial to your long-term recovery. During your initial sobriety period, you will need to avoid being around other people who are drinking. You should avoid bringing alcohol into your home and also let your loved ones know not to drink around you. This is the least they can do for you. If someone in your life doesn’t want to abide by this suggestion, then they are not willing to help you get clean.

It can be hard to end friendships or relationships that you had when you were drinking, but it’s just a part of life and the journey toward sobriety. You should only have relationships that benefit you. As hard as it can be to stop associating with friends who drink, it’s a lot harder to relapse and have to rebuild your sobriety.

Treating the Underlying Issue Before You Start Drinking Again

Treating the Underlying Issue Before You Start Drinking Again

One of the underlying issues that lead to relapse can be finding yourself in these social situations. You can be tempted to drink if you are around people who are drinking and having a good time. You have to remind yourself that you’re not the kind of person who can have a good time drinking.

I know that my drinking was causing problems for me. I know that I can’t drink and have fun. If I drink, it will lead me down a dark path. Drinking is not something that I can associate with. Now that I’ve been sober for a while, I can be around a little bit of drinking, but I have to keep myself and check and remove myself from the situation if I feel triggered.

Supporting a Loved One Into Treatment

Family therapy sessions can go a long way in helping loved ones through alcohol use disorders. Addiction recovery is a very personal thing that requires a lot of individual therapy, but family therapy can give you a better idea of how your drinking affects everyone else around you.

Peer support groups and individual therapy keep you on track. When I go to a group meeting, I listen to everything my peers have to say. I also try and be as honest as possible about my own issues. There are days when I don’t feel great, and I may be more likely to relapse. Going to meetings reminds me that I can stay clean if I put in the work.

Alcoholism is selfish. A lot of alcoholics don’t understand this until they get clean. Professional treatment goes a long way in helping you realize what your drinking does to everyone else around you. Recovery is an ongoing process, and a learning process as well. When you are in therapy, talk honestly. It’s the best thing you can do for yourself.

The Right Destination for Help with Alcohol

If you or a loved one are struggling with an alcohol use disorder, consider looking at the treatment option. I know for me, Pathfinders Recovery Center in Colorado was where I was finally able to find my footing and get sober.

You or your loved one may want to reach out and get options as well, after all, it only takes a few minutes to get options for putting all the consequences of drinking in your rearview mirror for good. Give them a confidential call to find out more today, I know my life has changed since I did!

How Much is a Gram of Cocaine?

How Much is a Gram of Cocaine

Understanding The Financial Impact of Drug Abuse

Drug abuse creates a lot of self-inflicted issues for the addict. In this article, I will help you understand the emotional, physical, and financial damage done by addiction. Through my cocaine addiction, I threw away relationships and opportunities that I will never get back. I also threw away a lot of money, which you will better understand when you know the answer to how much is a gram of cocaine.

My cocaine use was so drastic, that by the time I entered recovery at Pathfinders, I was nursing a three-hundred-dollar-a-day addiction. I found that even though I was stealing from other people to fund my drug abuse, I didn’t feel bad about it. The only thing I cared about was the drug, and I would get it by any means necessary.

Drug use is a crippling scenario no matter what addiction you have. I began smoking crack cocaine in my late teens and continued using cocaine through my entire twenties. When you have an addiction to a drug like cocaine, the purity levels will always vary. I’ve had cocaine that was so cut it barely had any cocaine in it.

Keep reading to find out more about my own descent into cocaine addiction, and how Pathfinders Recovery can help you launch your own recovery journey!

How Drug Prices Shape Your Addiction

When you have as fierce of a crack cocaine addiction as I did, you will do anything to finance it. The street prices for drugs can change depending on the drug. Some drugs are much more expensive. The street prices of opiates have skyrocketed in recent years, but drugs like crystal meth, heroin, and crack cocaine are usually much cheaper.

One of the reasons crack cocaine became such a popular drug in the 1980s is because of the price. Powder cocaine is typically a more luxurious drug. People will pay big money for a single gram of coke. A common price for one single gram of cocaine is around a hundred dollars these days. The market is different depending on multiple factors.

Depending on where you live, availability plays a big role in street prices. Cocaine prices can be hard to determine based on multiple factors. If you live closer to a country like Mexico, cocaine is usually cheaper. If you live further north, you will probably be paying a bit more because there is less supply.

The Varying Degree Of Cocaine Prices

The Varying Degree Of Cocaine Prices

The quality is also something to consider. Because cocaine is normally sold in powder form, it’s easy to cut with other drugs. Depending on the source, you won’t be able to know what you’re ingesting until you ingest it. The supply is always deceiving.

When you have a high level of cocaine addiction, you’re typically not getting it from one place. I had multiple dealer numbers on my phone, and they were all my lifeline. When I began using crack cocaine, the street price was around forty of fifty dollars for one gram.

Sometimes, if there was less crack available on the street, the price would be between sixty and eighty dollars a gram. Because an addiction to crack cocaine is so intense, you will pay whatever you need to. I’ve overpaid for cocaine at many points and didn’t even think twice about it.

The Relationship Between Crack Cocaine and Crime

Because cocaine prices can vary, you will do whatever you have to do to get high. I can remember a long period during my addiction when there was less availability of cocaine in my neighborhood. The law enforcement officials in my town had really cracked down on the amount of cocaine coming in, so it was harder to attain.

The sources that I had were arrested and taken off the street. By this point, I was already spending several hundred dollars a week to fund my habit. I was taking crack cocaine every hour. I was using it with more frequency, but I wasn’t getting any higher. My tolerance level was so high that I needed more and more crack to get the feeling I required.

When you have a bad drug addiction, you are only thinking in the short term. Long-term consequences don’t come into play. Very often you will engage in petty crime to fund your addiction. I began committing burglary in order to fund my crack habit. Life on the streets is cutthroat. I was willing to risk decades behind bars in order to continue to get high on a regular basis.

How To Curb Drug Addiction

How To Curb Drug Addiction

I finally had a moment of clarity when I was arrested. I had stolen over a thousand dollars of merchandise from a nearby business over the course of a year, and I was caught red-handed. I was given the opportunity to go to recovery or face years in prison. I considered my options and realized that this could end up being an effective way for me to get clean.

My crack addiction had destroyed me financially. I would spend up to fifty dollars for one gram of crack, and smoke it all within two hours. When your addiction is at a level as high as mine, it isn’t crazy to smoke three hundred dollars worth of crack in one day and still want more. Inflation, demand, high tolerance, and other factors will make you spend whatever you need to spend to get high.

The percentage of people who recover from crack addiction is low. It’s such an intense drug that it takes extreme methods to get clean. My crack addiction continued to increase even when I knew it was ravaging my body and mind. I overdosed multiple times, yet the drug still had a massive grip on me. In the USA, cocaine is responsible for one in five overdose deaths.

Relapse Doesn’t Have To Be The End Of Your Story

When I finally entered recovery, I was still in crack mode. I didn’t really want to involve myself in treatment. All I wanted to do was break out and call my dealer. I already knew the dangers associated with my drug abuse, but I did not care. I wasn’t making any progress.

I didn’t want to give up my drug use. In the past year, I made the decision that I was going to use crack until I died. I didn’t have any interest in getting clean. I relapsed soon after my initial treatment, and it would be another six months before I gave recovery another shot. I got to a point where I finally couldn’t stand it anymore.

The increase in the price of the drug, my high tolerance, and the overall hopelessness of my situation finally made me break. My cocaine use had broken my mind and my spirit. I finally decided to seek help, and at this point, I was actually doing it for myself. I wasn’t doing it so I could avoid jail time. I wanted to get clean once and for all.

This is the mindset you must have when you try to get clean. You aren’t going to get clean for anyone else but yourself. You have to make up your mind that you are sick and tired, and you are ready to put in the work required to achieve sobriety.

Embrace Your Journey of Cocaine Recovery

Embrace Your Journey of Cocaine Recovery

The cost of my habit had led me to do unthinkable things to other people. I truly felt like I had sold my soul in order to continue my addiction. It was a horrible feeling when I finally came to this realization. Drugs are always going to be a part of your past, and it’s wise to embrace that and use it in your recovery journey. You can’t shy away from the past.

I’ve since run into a couple of law enforcement officials who had at one time arrested me, and it was a unique reunion. They told me they didn’t think I would live to see forty. They told me I was one of the worst users they had ever encountered, and it gave them a lot of hope to see my work through recovery.

It’s moments like this that make it all worth it for me. I now speak to groups of young people about the dangers of addiction, and I take this position very seriously. I can’t prevent someone from using drugs. It’s up to the individual to make that choice. What I can do, however, is let people know the consequences. Doing that makes me feel like my journey was all worth it.

Save Money on Cocaine the Right Way: Choose Treatment

If you are getting sick of the highs and lows, not to mention how expensive supporting a cocaine habit is, consider attending treatment with Pathfinders Recovery Centers. Beyond the cost of the drug itself, I found myself paying for coke and crack use in so many ways that I didn’t even realize until I got some clean time.

I know for myself, the team at Pathfinders was able to help me find a new life. If you or a loved one are struggling too, give them a call. In a few minutes of a confidential consultation, they can and will give you options and resources for recovery. Why not reach out now?

Hiding Alcohol: What Does It Mean?

Hiding Alcohol

Why Does My Loved One Hide Alcohol?

Hiding alcohol is a very common sign of alcohol use disorder, also called alcohol addiction. If your loved one hides alcohol, you may find it around the house in the bottle it came in, in a water bottle, or in other drink containers.

When you discover that your loved one is hiding alcohol, it is often a scary time. Perhaps, you knew your loved one engaged in excessive drinking already, and discovering hidden alcohol around the house was the moment you could no longer ignore the problem. Alternatively, hidden alcohol could be one of the first signs of alcohol addiction you see.

Either way, your loved one deserves help and a judgment-free space to land. In this article, we’ll talk about alcohol use disorder and what to do if you discover that your loved one is drinking alcohol in private.

Keep reading to learn more about how to help a loved one with alcohol, and about the effective programs for recovery at Pathfinders in Colorado and Arizona!

Understanding Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD)

Alcohol Use Disorder

Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a mental illness, just like other substance use disorders. It could be that your loved one experiences alcohol addiction alone, or it could be that their alcohol consumption occurs alongside the use of other drugs.

While multiple risk factors increase the risk of an alcohol use disorder, the fact of the matter is that anyone can face alcohol addiction. Substance abuse has become increasingly prevalent throughout the years. The good news is that AUD is a treatable disorder.

Signs And Severity of an Alcohol Use Disorder

While hiding alcohol is one sign of a problem, understanding the other symptoms of alcohol addiction can help you identify it in yourself, family members, friends, or someone else you know, like a partner. Alcohol use disorder can be mild, moderate, or severe. Mild alcohol use disorder is marked by two to three of the signs below, whereas moderate alcohol use disorder is marked by three to five and severe alcohol use disorder is marked by six or more.

Signs of alcohol abuse include but aren’t limited to:

  • Drinking alcohol in large amounts or over a longer period than intended.
  • A persistent desire to stop drinking paired with unsuccessful efforts to reduce or control alcohol use.
  • Cravings or a strong desire to drink alcohol.
  • Spending a large portion of time on activities required to obtain, use, or recover from the effects of alcohol.
  • Continued alcohol use that results in failure to attend to obligations at work, school, or home.
  • Continuing to drink despite negative effects in the form of ongoing social or interpersonal problems caused or exacerbated by alcohol consumption.
  • Giving up or reducing time spent on important social, occupational, or recreational activities due to alcohol use.
  • Recurrent alcohol use despite getting into physically hazardous situations due to drinking.
  • Continued drinking despite recurrent or persistent physical or mental health issues that are likely caused or worsened by alcohol.
  • Tolerance is marked by either a need for higher drinking levels (a larger quantity of drinks) to achieve desired effects or a markedly reduced level of intoxication from drinking the same amount of alcohol.
  • Withdrawals marked by either withdrawal syndrome or consuming alcohol or a closely related substance, like benzodiazepines, to avoid or relieve withdrawal symptoms.

 

Regardless of severity level, getting professional help is crucial. Friends and family members are often an important part of a person’s support system, so the fact that you are reading this is already an excellent first step. Now, what are the treatment options?

Treatment Options For Alcohol Addiction

Residential Treatment For Alcohol Abuse

Everyone with a substance use disorder will have different treatment needs. Thankfully, there’s more than one treatment option for AUD. Treatment options for alcohol addiction include but aren’t limited to:

Residential treatment

Residential treatment involves staying at the treatment facility for the duration of care. In other words, individuals attending residential treatment will sleep and eat at the facility to which they are admitted.

You or your family member attending treatment will typically engage in various therapies (such as individual, group, and family therapy), creating a relapse prevention plan, and other helpful activities while in a residential treatment program.

Long-term rehab

It takes a lot of work and courage to manage addiction. Long-term rehab is ideal for those who require a longer duration of treatment than residential programs provide.

Residential treatment stays are usually around one to three months, whereas long-term rehab allows someone to stay in treatment for more than three months. While it depends on the person and their needs, some stay in long-term rehab for six months to a year.

Partial hospitalization programs

Partial hospitalization program

A partial hospitalization program (PHP) is more intensive than an outpatient program but less intensive than inpatient treatment. Like with outpatient programs, you do not sleep at the facility when you attend PHP. However, PHP usually requires a time commitment of around twenty hours per week.

Intensive outpatient programs

An intensive outpatient program (IOP) for mental health concerns like substance use disorders is exactly what it sounds like. Rather than sleep and eat at a treatment facility, intensive outpatient allows someone to live at home or otherwise outside of a facility while in care. IOP requires a time commitment of between nine to nineteen hours per week.

Medical detox

Withdrawals are uncomfortable. Medical detox is a safe space to go through the initial withdrawal and detoxification process while supervised by medical professionals. Some people, though not all, attend medical detox prior to treatment.

The Myth Of The “High-Functioning Alcoholic”

High-Functioning Alcoholic

You may or may not have heard the term “high-functioning alcoholic.” Usually, the term high-functioning alcoholic is used to describe a person who continues to engage in society through maintaining a job or their family life despite heavy drinking or an otherwise notable drinking problem. This may represent your loved one who attempts to hide alcohol.

Loved ones hiding drinking problems sometimes feel that they “have it under control” and may initially resist treatment. That said, a drinking problem is always serious enough to get help. Take a deep breath and know that your loved one can get to a better place.

Get Help For Yourself Or A Loved One

If your loved one is hiding alcohol or shows other signs of alcohol addiction, there is hope. Pathfinders Recovery Center is here to help. Pathfinders Recovery Center has many locations and levels of care in Arizona and Colorado. The levels of care we offer include residential, outpatient, partial hospitalization, detox, and long-term rehab.

Our hotline is available 24/7 for people with substance use disorders and their loved ones. When you contact Pathfinders Recovery Center, we will help you verify insurance coverage for treatment and find a placement at one of our facilities.

Call Pathfinders Recovery Center to speak with an addiction counselor today or fill out the Contact Us form on our website now!

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on Hiding Alcohol

Why do people hide their alcohol?

If someone hides alcohol in their own home, it is usually because the person knows that they have a problem. A person may hide alcohol out of shame or so that others do not know how much alcohol they drink.

Where do people usually hide alcohol?

If you find alcohol hidden by a loved one once, you may wonder where else they’re hiding alcohol. Common spots to find hidden alcohol include dresser drawers, closets, or containers typically used for other drinks, such as water bottles.

How to Help Someone into Rehab

Help Someone into Rehab

Guiding a Loved One Toward Addiction Treatment

Getting clean was never on my radar. I was pretty far gone. At the darkest point in my substance abuse, I thought that I never even wanted to be clean. I wanted to do drugs until I died. Because of my family members, I finally sought treatment at Pathfinders and it saved my life. This can work for you too if you have even a little bit of fight in you. Keep reading for my hard-earned experience on how to help someone into rehab!

If you want to get help for a loved one with a drug or alcohol addiction, there are a lot of hurdles. Ultimately, getting sober is up to the individual. Substance use disorder tricks you into thinking you can never get clean. You think that your addiction will last the rest of your life. There doesn’t seem to be a lot of hope.

We tell ourselves a lot of things when we are in despair. To get over your substance abuse, it’s going to take an entire attitude change. Addiction recovery is possible if you are ready to give it a shot. When you finally get sick and tired of being sick and tired, an addiction treatment center like Pathfinders can save your life.

Stay tuned here for my own story of being helped to rehab, and how Pathfinders Recovery Centers helped me do what I could never manage on my own!

How Do You Leave A Drug Or Alcohol Addiction Behind?

Substance abuse therapy

I began using drugs in high school and was a regular users into my thirties. My brain was wired to need drugs. Substance abuse treatment was the last thing on my mind. My family members tried to convince me to get help, but I was dead against it. The idea of drug treatment never entered my mind.

My substance abuse completely changed my brain and my personality. Drug addiction will do a lot of things to your body, but the mental aspect of it is the most difficult thing to get past. Getting clean requires a lot of emotional support and an emphasis on your mental health. If you’re not mentally prepared, substance abuse seems impossible to get over.

Even if you are at your weakest point mentally, recovery from drug and alcohol addiction is still possible. One of the biggest things to keep in mind is that you can change your perspective whenever you want. You don’t have to always be a victim to your substance use. I finally realized this when I began the recovery process.

Substance Abuse Hurts More Than Just You.

I put my family through a lot of agony because of my substance addiction. I had multiple addictions that ruined my life and made me a shell of myself. I engaged in alcohol abuse and heroin addiction for so long that I was sure I would die. What finally made me decide to go to a treatment facility? A big part of it was for my family.

This sounds great, but it can also be the wrong approach sometimes. Ultimately, you have to get sober for yourself. You want to do it for your loved ones, but you’re the one that has to live with yourself. I finally was ready to face my drug abuse when I overdosed and nearly died. A family member found me after I overdosed and because of their quick thinking, I was able to get medical help quickly enough.

When finally came out of it, I was ashamed of what I had subjected my family to. It finally dawned on me that I needed to find a way to repay this relative for literally saving my life. That is where my recovery journey began. My family members set up an addiction intervention, and luckily I was willing to listen to them.

Embracing Drug And Alcohol Addiction Treatment

Drug And Alcohol Addiction Treatment

Addiction treatment seems terrifying when you first try it. If you find the right rehab program that works for you, you will find that you can greatly benefit from it. These days, there are many different treatment options depending on your specific addiction. The treatment program at Pathfinders offered me the ability to work on my issues head on and develop a treatment plan tailored to my addiction.

When you make the decision to accept treatment, you’ve already done more than many others. The success rate in recovery is unfortunately not very high. A lot of addicts never make the decision to get professional help. A lot of addicts get clean for a short period, but long term recovery is very tricky.

The rehab program that I went into didn’t just help me. There are many benefits for the people around you as well. I had many loved ones who attended family therapy around the same time that I was in addiction recovery. I had no idea that I had put them through so much pain until I finally started to clear my head of the drugs.

Warning Signs Of An Active Addiction

I was able to fool people for a long time. A few people close to me knew that I engaged in substance misuse, but most of my family had no idea that I was using drugs regularly. An addicted person is an expert in lying. Not just to others, but to themselves. You begin to believe your own lies after a while.

I was sure that I didn’t have a problem. No professional intervention or involuntary commitment was going to convince me otherwise. At this early point in my struggle, I was able to hide my addiction issues. This usually never lasts. The longer your addiction goes on, the more signs of addiction you begin to show.

The withdrawal symptoms can’t be hidden. Especially if you have a heroin addiction. Withdrawal symptoms from heroin include paranoia, stomach issues, agitation, and extreme cravings. If you go without heroin for too long, you become physically ill like you’ve never felt. At first, I was able to convince my family that I had chronic stomach issues, but they eventually saw through it.

How Do You Get Someone Into Rehab?

This is a question that family members of addicts struggle with mightily. Getting someone into rehab is more involved than just taking them to a rehab facility and dropping them off. Helping a person suffering requires a lot of care and patience. Building a support system around an addict is the first step. You have to let them know they are loved and supported.

It’s very hard to get clean if you have no support system. Some people have no family support. Luckily, once you get into the rehab process, you can find a lot of like-minded individuals who will take you under their wing. I had a lot of family support, but I also had a lot of support from the people in my treatment program. I stay sober because I have built great relationships with others in recovery.

You can encourage a loved one to get help, but you can’t force them. Being impatient with an addict will only push them away. Having a positive attitude and not passing judgment is the best option. Figuring out your loved one’s needs can be tricky, but you want to try and understand their struggle as much as possible.

How To Speak To An Addict

Support Groups For Substance Use

Most people struggling with addiction don’t want to talk about it with outsiders. It’s easy to confide in a fellow user because they have first-hand experience. You aren’t going to get an addict to open up to you if they sense any judgment. You’re not going to guilt anyone into getting clean. You can encourage them to seek treatment, but you have to be careful how you choose your words.

Identifying what kind of tone you use is also very important. Offering support to someone suffering requires a high level of understanding and a calm demeanor. There is so much denial in addiction, that just getting an addict to open up and be honest is rare. A lot of family members of addicts choose tough love.

Sometimes you will get so fed up that you will cut someone off and not allow them back into your life until they are clean. This can be a tricky approach to take with an addicted loved one. Cutting someone off with a substance abuse problem can go either way. With some people, it’s just the push that they need. With other people, it can be the end of a relationship.

Support Groups For Substance Use

Staying sober is just as hard as getting sober. Whether you have a drug or alcohol addiction, the day-to-day recovery process is a combination of highs and lows. Drug use changes the brain. That is one of the clearest signs of addiction. All you care about is the drug. When you have to retrain your brain to go through each day without the drug, you have to find different ways to cope.

The treatment center at Pathfinders had some really incredible group therapy sessions that completely changed my attitude. I had an intervention plan put in place to set me up for success, and I followed it as rigidly as possible. During my early days in recovery, I attended group therapy as well as individual counseling.

There is no step-by-step guide for everyone struggling with addiction, or even for the ways to prevent drug abuse in the first place, but if you find yourself in the right rehab center, you can develop a plan that will help you find the most effective way to get and stay clean. Excuses don’t hold much weight in recovery. You are expected to take personal responsibility for your actions, and develop the knowledge and skills that you’ll need to face your addiction head-on.

Mental Illness and Addiction

Family Support

A very challenging aspect of recovery is how you discuss your mental health. A lot of individuals who are suffering from addiction are also suffering from some type of mental illness. How you approach these issues in recovery charts the course of your future. Substance misuse can greatly affect the way that we participate in talking about our struggles.

Many rehab programs offer dual diagnosis, so that you can work on your mental health issues and your addiction simultaneously. It may sound like a lot to take on at once, but it’s been proven effective in many situations. Committing to the process is the first step. If you commit to seeking help, you will find your confidence built as you work through the process.

When you’re in a group setting, it can be scary to discuss the issues that you never wanted to admit to yourself, let alone to a group of strangers. Putting yourself out there in this way may be uncomfortable, but this discomfort is what helps you grow. I was terrified to talk about what I was struggling with. When I finally opened up and started doing it, I found it to be the best way to begin healing.

The Basic Needs of A Recovering Addict

Once you get someone into rehab, it’s up to them to figure out whether they will make it work. We all have basic needs as human beings. For people struggling with addiction, those needs include support, compassion, and love. Every family member that I wronged was still there for me, even though they were fed up with my antics.

It’s important to set up healthy boundaries in addiction recovery. You still have to be yourself, and you can’t try to be something someone else wants you to be. I had family members who thought that I would be a flawless person once I treated my addiction. We are all still flawed, no matter what challenges we overcome. When you set boundaries, you maintain your individuality.

A Treatment Center with a Program Built Around You

Treatment begins and ends with you. It takes a lot of help to get and stay clean, but ultimately it’s up to you to make it work. When you go to rehab, there is a lot of unexpected outcomes. The best approach is to stay in the moment.

Respect the process and embrace the struggle. This approach will very likely save your life, and it’s one I learned at Pathfinders. If you or someone you love is struggling as I did, give yourself (or them) a fighting chance and reach out to their Admissions team. I know I’m more than glad I made that call, and that if I had not I might never have been able to claim sobriety or even still be alive.

Moment of Clarity Meaning

Moment of Clarity Meaning

A Defining Moment in Overcoming Drinking and Drugs

Having a moment of clarity during an addiction is a life defining moment. It’s hard to describe to anybody, even fellow addicts in recovery. My spiritual awakening began when I arrived at Pathfinders Recovery Center, and it felt like a true miracle. If you are ready to have your moment of clarity, keep reading to find out what it takes to reach that point.

Having this moment is intensely personal and hard to forget. I truly believe this moment is possible for every person who has dealt with an addiction. It was one of the greatest moments of my life. When I began to meet people in recovery, many of them pointed to this moment as also being the best thing to ever happen to them.

What does it take to make this moment of clarity happen? To put it bluntly, it takes a lot of soul searching and self reflection. When you realize you want to change, you realize that it’s going to be a fight. If you are prepared for that fight and everything that comes with it, it will all make sense.

Keep reading to find out more about my moment of clarity meaning, and how it helped me find lasting recovery with Pathfinders Recovery Centers!

Your Spiritual Awakening Is Right Around The Corner

My drug addiction began when I was in college and quickly led me to a life of crime, uncertainty, and selfishness. I pushed loved ones away, friends, and anybody who tried to steer me in the right direction. I didn’t want to talk about it, I just wanted to continue getting high and never answering for my misdeeds.

The only thing that made sense was getting high. Everything else seemed like a hurdle. Basic every day tasks seemed challenging and unrealistic. I gave up on living my life and pushing myself in any way. It’s hard to look back at my life then and make sense of it. I had gotten to a point where nothing mattered but the drugs.

Feeling this way all the time takes a huge toll on your mental health. Drugs change your behavior and turn you against everyone who doesn’t enable you. My relationship to drugs and alcohol felt like it would be life lasting. I had no hope and the idea of living my life to the fullest didn’t matter. Some people truly need to hit rock bottom to get better. That’s what happened to me.

Having An Epiphany During Addiction

Woke up in jail - Epiphany During Addiction

It’s hard to pinpoint how, when, and why the moment of clarity occurs. For me personally, it was when I woke up in jail with no idea how I got there. I had been drinking heavily, and apparently assaulted a police officer. Sitting in that jail cell and looking at the dried blood on my hands made me feel like such a failure.

It was in that moment that the epiphany happened. I realized I was slowly killing myself. I was hurting my body, my mind, and my soul. It finally occurred to me the reality of my situation. I was completely enslaved to my addiction. My brain was not my own. For once in my addiction, I was finally aware of what I had become.

This feeling was overpowering. I sat there and cried for a long time, but something was different. I didn’t feel hopeless. For the first time, I questioned myself. I discovered the truth of my situation. I thought about seeking help, the first time I had ever had that thought. I embraced the idea of getting better. How great leaving my addiction behind would feel. It could be a great story.

Making The Moment Of Clarity Happen

It’s uncomfortable to question yourself and realize your life is unfulfilling. It’s a hard lesson to learn. I decided in that moment, sitting in that cell, my life was worth living. I was ready to try new things I had never tried. I was ready to confront my behavior and talk myself through the struggle.

When I got out of jail, I called a family member and asked if they would take me to recovery. They were stunned. I had never tried recovery. I never wanted to. It was another incredible moment in my step toward getting better. For the first time in a long time, I felt human. I felt all the feelings rush over me. It was time for me to embrace the idea of giving up my drinking and drug use.

When I went into detox, I was proud of myself for taking that first step. It was very uncomfortable, but as they say in recovery, I was sick and tired of being sick and tired. At Pathfinders, I gained new insights into myself and my personality. I learned about how my past trauma had led me down this dark path. I began to seek the light.

When The Moment Passes, The Fight Begins

Moment of Clarity during group therapy

A moment of clarity doesn’t last forever. Once you begin your recovery journey, your not going to feel one hundred percent great the whole time. There will be times of doubt. But the insight I gained through this process taught me to embrace these feelings of doubt just as much as the hopeful feelings. I had my epiphany, now it was time for me to do the work and understand that it wasn’t going to be easy.

Every step of recovery is a challenge. Addiction is all consuming. Being under the influence feels safe and comforting when your in the thick of it. You don’t see how terrible it is until you take a step back and look at it with a different mindset. It’s frightening how much you can lull yourself into continuing your habit. You feel like you have no control.

When I began to recover from my addiction, group therapy helped a lot. Meeting other supportive people going through such a complicated process such as recovery pushed me to confront my fears and my anxiety. I knew that I could potentially relapse, but I accepted this possibility and didn’t let the fear control me.

Living Your Best Life In Recovery

Clarity teaches you a lot about yourself. We all have moments where we question ourselves and our path. This is especially true when you become sober. When you are newly sober, you are feeling all sorts of feelings that you were avoiding before. Gaining insight into yourself allows you to not only help yourself, but help others too.

When you accept that you are an addict, it’s easy to welcome in new ideas. You may not have all the answers, but you have a good blueprint to work from. Understanding this part of the process gives you strength. Being in a group setting with other former addicts gives you a sense of familiarity and kinship. When I hear others talk about their struggle, it makes me want to keep moving forward in my own battle.

I lead by example these days, and I tell my story to whoever is open to hearing it. My objective is to help others while also helping myself. I can’t ignore the fact that I need supportive people around me. I spend a lot of my time now talking to others in recovery and learning about their experience. It’s important to talk about your experience, whether it’s with a friend, loved one, or a fellow recovering addict.

Expect The Unexpected

Seek help during recovery

In sobriety, you have to keep in mind that your addiction isn’t too far in the distance. The essence of sobriety is embracing tough moments. We all have them. Being sober doesn’t mean your going to be in a great mood all the time. Recovery can prepare you for this, but when your alone with your thoughts, it can still be hard to hang on. Painful moments may come, but they can be balanced with moments of joy.

When you seek help, it works if you are ready to make it work. There’s no better feeling than putting a priority on your mental and physical health. The answer to getting clean and staying clean is to constantly work on yourself. You don’t get sober and then not have to do anything else. You must accept that it’s an ongoing process.

When you get to a point where you decide to be the best person you can be, you’ll notice that your behavior will start to change. When you put in the work, you will notice it very quickly. When I think of where I came from, it’s hard to imagine that I was ever comfortable living that lifestyle. It doesn’t help that the stigma attached to addiction makes a lot of people not seek help.

Epiphanies Aren’t The Same For Everyone.

The way you experience your moment of clarity is very personal to you. The decision to get clean looks different for everyone. As different as it may be from person to person, there are similarities. Acknowledging your addictive behavior and how it affects the people around you is a universal truth. Taking a look in the mirror is a big part of it.

My loved ones see the progress that I have made, and they make sure to tell me what a great job I’ve done. I don’t let this go to my head either. I know that I’ve enriched my life and the lives of those around me, but I try to remain humble. Moments of weakness still occur, but I don’t let myself be a prisoner of those moments. I feel them and I let them go.

Giving Yourself a Chance at Clarity

When you put your heart and soul into anything, you will often see the benefits come back to you. Making changes in your life is hard, but having a plan in place guides you in the right direction. I enjoy every day and every moment that I am clean, even if I’m not in the greatest mood. The months and years that you stay clean add up. Being sober can not just feel good, it can be the greatest feeling you’ve ever had.

If you’re struggling, or seeking that moment of clarity, why not give yourself a chance a sobriety and the support to sort things out with Pathfinders. Give them a call, I know I’m glad I did!

How Does Fentanyl Kill You?

How Does Fentanyl Kill You

Answers About Fentanyl Lethality and Overdose Potential

Struggling with a fentanyl addiction is a life-threatening condition and can be extremely dangerous. More so than even opioid addiction. Illicit fentanyl has become much more common on the street and it has caused overdoses to skyrocket. But how does fentanyl kill you, exactly?

Despite the dangers, there are ways to address a fentanyl addiction and get the help that you need.

I entered Pathfinders Recovery Center for treatment after multiple overdoses and coming as close to death as one can with fentanyl. Drug abuse is a brutal condition to combat, but dealing with a drug like fentanyl requires a whole different level of addiction treatment.

Pharmaceutical fentanyl and illicit fentanyl are both deadly and can be abused just like any other drugs. With the rise of opioid abuse in this country, drug dealers have found new ways to cut these drugs, and fentanyl typically is used in this process. A lot of people who ingest fentanyl don’t even realize they are taking such a deadly drug.

Keep reading to find answers to how does fentanyl kill you, and how Pathfinders Recovery can offer you the same sort of foundation for sobriety that I found with their help.

The Rise Of Fentanyl Use and Fentanyl Overdoses

How long fentanyl stays in your system depends on your level of addiction and your body mass. Pharmaceutical fentanyl in pill form can take minutes before you feel the effects, while a fentanyl patch can one to two days to take effect. Fentanyl is usually only prescribed to people with severe pain associated with cancer and other extreme illnesses.

Many drug tests don’t detect fentanyl, and a separate test may be required to detect it. With a drug that’s manufactured to treat severe pain, it’s no wonder that when taken recreationally it can be dangerous. Because it’s used to treat chronic pain, it is easily abused. According to the Drug Enforcement Administration, Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is fifty to one hundred times more powerful than morphine.

Because of the rise of fentanyl, many addiction treatment programs are designed to treat that specific addiction. Because fentanyl is such a potent synthetic opioid, intervening in a fentanyl addiction is a life or death situation. The world of drug abuse changes over time, and new substances make their way onto the market all the time. No one has ever seen anything like the rise of fentanyl.

Fentanyl Withdrawal Symptoms

Fentanyl Withdrawal Symptoms

A fentanyl withdrawal is very similar to opiate withdrawal symptoms. Fentanyl withdrawal symptoms include flu-like symptoms, muscle aches, nausea and vomiting, and respiratory changes. These withdrawal symptoms vary in severity depending on a multitude of factors. Fentanyl withdrawal symptoms can persist for up to two weeks.

Plenty of other drugs come with very uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms, but opioids and synthetic opioids like fentanyl are particularly rough. I used heroin for a number of years and dabbled here and there with fentanyl. Even though I knew how dangerous it was, my fentanyl abuse continued and led me down the darkest path I’ve ever been down.

My fentanyl use messed with every part of my body. My liver function was affected, and I suffered from respiratory depression and shallow breathing. Even heavy users of opioids don’t experience the difficulty that fentanyl abuse causes. When I began taking fentanyl, my body was already in a rough spot because of my heroin abuse.

How To Detect Fentanyl Through Drug Tests

Fentanyl has led to new developments in drug testing technology. Fentanyl test strips are a way to test for fentanyl and can tell you how long fentanyl can stay in your system. Fentanyl is not easily detected in urine tests, hair tests, or saliva tests. Fentanyl test strips have revolutionized the way that we test for fentanyl.

Before my fentanyl abuse, I dealt with long-lasting opioid dependence. My drug use began in my early twenties and continued until I was in my late thirties. Even though I was a substance abuse veteran, nothing could prepare me for what fentanyl did to me. Powder fentanyl is what I became addicted to, but it didn’t start there.

My first experience with fentanyl was through counterfeit pills. These are fentanyl-laced prescription drugs that are very much responsible for the rise in overdose deaths associated with this drug. It’s extremely difficult to prevent people from ingesting these pills, because, on the black market, drug users are going to do what they’re going to do.

Fentanyl can come in many different forms. There is the powder form, but there are also nasal sprays and a transdermal patch. Fentanyl powder can also be cooked down into an injectable solution. There aren’t many other substances that come in so many different forms.

When To Seek Help

Seek help for fentanyl detox

Even though I was able to hide my addiction from my loved ones, it was eating me alive inside. I suffer from a variety of mental health disorders, namely bipolar depression. This was very tricky when it came time for me to seek help. I had a lot of issues to work through beyond just my substance use.

Because I had such a severe addiction, I needed medical supervision during my detox. Getting fentanyl out of a person’s system takes a rather brutal detox process. Anyone who has been addicted to any powerful opioid will tell you how uncomfortable it is to ween yourself off of it. The side effects are crushing and can make you want to give in very easily.

When I entered rehab, I was facing potential prison time because of where my drug addiction took me. Every drug test they gave me through probation I would fail. I was given a lot of chances, but the drug testing always told the truth. I couldn’t be trusted to get help on my own.

How Does Fentanyl Kill You?

There’s no handbook for how to overcome an addiction to fentanyl. I never imagined that addiction treatment would do anything for me. Because I was so highly addicted, it seemed like it would take an act of god for me to not go back to my old ways. Drugs stay in your system longer the more you take them. It took nearly three weeks after my last dose for the drug’s half-life to dissipate.

When I finally took the last drug test that showed that I had rid of the drug from my body, it was a unique feeling. It felt like there would always be something that would come back. When you’ve quit using the drug and it still shows up in standard drug tests, it can feel like it will never go away.

There are a lot of things that got me through that initial phase of recovery. The behavioral therapies I engaged in were extremely helpful, and all the other recovering addicts I’ve met along the way have helped me stay the course. Using fentanyl as long as I did made me realize how damaged my body and my soul had become. No matter how much damage is done, you can always heal.

How To Overcome Such A Highly Addictive Drug

Overcome Fentanyl Addiction Through Group Therapy

I got used to taking drug test after drug test when I was a fentanyl addict. Through probation and jail, I was given every type of drug test you could imagine. After taking so many blood tests, urine tests, and the occasional hair test, it really makes you feel like a human experiment.

Now that I am clean, I have a much different appreciation for forensic medicine. All of the advances in drug testing and screening for other opioids have saved many lives. I consider myself a part of this process as well as I continued my sobriety journey. I’ve met all kinds of people through group therapy who have inspired me.

These groups are a wonderful collection of folks who have overcome many different addictions, from opioids to alcohol. A lot of these people are at many different stages of their recovery as well. Some of these people are still close enough to the beginning of recovery that they still experience withdrawal symptoms. The best thing that I can do is be there to support them and let them know they aren’t alone.

Finding Lasting Recovery From Fentanyl

Individual therapy as well as family therapy has worked wonders for me in my sobriety. Gone are the days when I would pray before drug tests, hoping nothing would be detected in my urine. The respiratory arrest, insomnia, and body chills are no longer there. I am no longer looking up on the internet how I can beat a drug test. I am no longer searching for how does fentanyl kill you, as I found out firsthand.

When I go to meetings, I bring a positive attitude with me. I focus on solution-based thinking as opposed to problem-based thinking. I am no longer all doom and gloom in my personal life. It’s been a long road, but I have traveled it willingly and am open to addressing whatever issues may arise in the future.

Put Worries About Drug Testing in Your Past

I am open and willing to talk about my struggle and am aware that I’m not invincible to it. I can still slip up and go back to my old routine of using drugs, getting in trouble, and being subjected to hair tests and saliva tests. Fentanyl will stay with me forever, but in a different way than it used to.

If you are struggling with fentanyl, give yourself a chance at sobriety with the program for recovery found at Pathfinders. They helped me, and I am willing to bet they will give you solid options for a different outlook on life as well!

Alanon vs AA

Alanon vs AA Therapy

AA and Al-anon as Recovery Support Groups

Alcohol addiction was my downfall and led me to not only let myself down but all of my family members as well. I’ve struggled with alcoholism and substance abuse for much of my adult life, and by the time I sought treatment at Pathfinders, I was willing to do anything to get my life back. My family suffered greatly as well until they discovered Al-Anon.

Having a drinking problem is one thing, being a full-blown alcoholic is a whole other world. I started drinking when I was in high school, and by the time I reached the legal drinking age, I was already suffering from serious alcohol abuse. My family had no idea what to do with me, and it tore them apart inside.

My first time going to Alcoholics Anonymous was scary, and I learned quickly about AlAnon vs AA. Going to any alcoholism support group for the first time is nerve-wracking. I didn’t want to feel judged. I initially started going to private meetings, but I was led to believe that group-based meetings would give me a lot of good perspective from others going through addiction treatment.

Keep reading if you too did not know about Al-anon vs AA, and if you or a loved one are struggling with substances and alcohol, you can find the same sort of help I did with Pathfinders Recovery.

What Can You Expect From Sober Support Groups

Although I expected to be judged, I had a completely opposite experience going to Alcoholics Anonymous. Alcohol addiction affects people from all walks of life. It doesn’t discriminate. I met people from all across the social spectrum. Going to AA meetings gave me the strength to speak up and share my story with others, no matter how awkward it was at first.

A typical AA meeting is fairly simple. You go around in a circle and discuss your alcohol problems. Going to AA meetings slowly gave me the confidence to open up about my substance abuse and also my mental health disorder. I’ve struggled my whole life with my mental health, which has led me to drug abuse and alcohol dependence.

AA focuses on what led you to where you are at and how you can avoid succumbing to alcohol use disorder. I first began going to open meetings, and once I joined the program, I switched it up between open meetings and closed meetings. Open meetings refer to Alcoholics Anonymous meetings that are open to anybody. Closed meetings are for people who have been in the Alcoholics Anonymous program for a longer period of time.

Al Anon Meetings Vs AA Meetings

AA Meetings

There are many different types of AA groups. Your average Alcoholics Anonymous meeting is for the alcoholic. The main difference is that Al Anon meetings are directed specifically toward the family members of alcoholics. My substance abuse and alcohol use disorder put a great strain on my family members. My parents, siblings, and other family members were greatly affected to the point where they needed to seek treatment for themselves. Al-Anon gave me the space to deal with these issues.

We don’t often talk about the effects of drug addiction, and alcoholism on our family members. Substance use is a community issue. There are more people struggling than just the drug abuser themselves, everyone around them gets affected as well. Once my family began going to Al-Anon meetings, I could see the strain lifted off of them almost immediately.

They always questioned if my addiction was because of something they did wrong. This question tormented my parents especially. I had one family member in particular who was skeptical of support groups. They wanted to try and deal with it on their own. Once they began going to Al-Anon meetings, I noticed it was very beneficial for them in their own healing.

Treatment Programs For Family Members

It was vital for my family’s well-being that they attend Al-Anon meetings. As I began the process of going to regular meetings, so did they. The other Al-Anon members were extremely supportive and uplifting, much like they are in AA and NA meetings. It’s roughly the same concept across each group. The focus is on learning what you can do to apply the same principles that alcoholics use in their own treatment.

I was so much more driven to stop drinking permanently when I saw the work my own family was putting into their recovery. My drinking problem was something that I needed to fix on my own, but I was much more inspired to do so when I saw them putting in their own work.

Alcoholics Anonymous taught me that there is only one way to stop drinking. You must recognize that there is a higher power, and you yourself are powerless against your disease. The circumstances may differ from person to person, but that higher power aspect is a big part of recovery.

Although Alcoholics Anonymous is thought of as a faith-based program, you can benefit no matter what your religious affiliation is. The religious aspect may be part of it, but it doesn’t have to be the entire focus. AA refers to itself as ‘spiritual and not religious’ and there is truth to the fact you can define your own Higher Power in the program. The main objective of these support groups is to help you get better, however, that process may look.

Al Anon Support Groups And Other Meetings

The families of alcoholics suffer just as much as the alcoholic. My alcohol problems led my family members to a lot of their own problems. Stress, anxiety, you name it. My drinking problem affected everyone around me. It’s a very helpless feeling for families to watch a loved one suffer without knowing how to stop it.

Al Anon Support Groups

AA and Al-Anon make it possible for everyone to get better together. These days, the treatment options for the alcoholic and the family are abundant. AA is an international support group. AA and Al-Anon meetings seek to provide treatment programs to everybody affected by this disease. The two groups work in conjunction to offer support and recovery across all meetings.

When my family first began going to these Al-Anon meetings, it gave them the tools to better support me in my own recovery. I had to learn how to be self-supporting on my own, but having your family in your corner gives you the extra push that you need. A lot of alcoholics aren’t lucky enough to have family members rooting for them. I feel that my recovery from alcohol is directly related to my family going to Al-Anon meetings and knowing how to better deal with my addiction.

Continuing Support For Alcohol Recovery

Recovery from alcohol addiction is an ongoing process. There is no magic cure for addiction. There is a lot to be said about the term ‘one day at a time’. If you think you are cured at any point from your addiction, you certainly need to take personal inventory and be honest with yourself.

You can have all the support in the world, but it doesn’t matter if you don’t recognize that your addiction is right there beneath the surface. In my experience, recovery is only possible if you work on it every day. It’s more than just going to support groups. You need the right attitude. If you attend a meeting or engage in support groups, you give yourself a much better chance.

Either way, there is work that is required outside the group setting. AA and Al-Anon meetings give you a great base from which to work, but you need to also be self-supporting. The great thing about AA and Al-Anon is there are no age or education requirements. If you are directly affected by addiction, you automatically qualify. There is no gatekeeping in these groups.

Recovery Through Al Anon Groups

My family greatly benefited from Al-Anon. Their recovery from my addiction has been very inspiring for me to watch. As they go through their own personal recovery, I do as well. Going through recovery together makes us push each other to be at our best every day. When I attend a meeting, I feel like I’m doing it’s mutually beneficial to all of us, and I know they feel the same way when they attend meetings.

Recovery Through Al Anon Groups

My addiction used to be a hush-hush situation in my family. It was always too painful to talk about. When you find the right support group such as AA and Al-Anon, you learn to talk about it without feeling shame. Al-Anon taught my family that they are not unique. Countless families deal with these issues and many of them benefit from Al-Anon. Unfortunately, some don’t ever take that leap and give al anon a shot.

Finding Your Path to Recovery

I’m proud to have such a supportive and encouraging family, and I certainly have Al-Anon to thank for that. These days there is much more support for families of addicts. Al-Anon groups make it possible for families to heal the right way. Everyone in my family learned from Al-Anon, and they try to put what they’ve learned into practice every day. It’s a wonderful thing to witness.

If you or a member of your family is struggling with alcohol and needs help, reaching out to Pathfinders is a solid first step. Give them a call and let them provide options, so that you or a person you love does not have to battle booze any longer. I know picking up the phone for treatment made a world of difference for me and my family, and it can for you and yours too!

Meth Eyes

What is Meth Eyes

The Startling Effects of Meth Abuse

When I arrived at Pathfinders Recovery Centers, my meth addiction was terrible. Substance abuse runs in my family, and my meth use was another unfortunate example of that. Methamphetamine abuse is one of the most difficult addictions to contend with, and for someone in my situation, it was only a matter of time before my body gave out.

Every day that I was feeding my meth addiction, I felt that my heart was going to explode. I felt like every person I walked past was saying something negatively about me, judging me. I was probably wrong in most of these instances, but with my physical appearance being what it was, I’m certain that I scared people with my presence.

The common signs of meth abuse are some of the most obvious of any drug addiction, and I had them all. Meth mouth, skin sores, dilated pupils, red eyes, you name it. My meth eyes were what I think scared people the most. When I looked people in the eyes, I could feel their stomachs turn.

Keep reading if you are struggling with meth, to find out about getting past the damage done and into healing with the help of Pathfinders!

Seeing The World Through Meth Eyes

There are plenty of negative health effects from methamphetamine drug use, but the meth eyes are the most startling. I viewed the world through blurred vision, bloodshot eyes, and psychosis. My eye movements were rapid and startling. I felt like a squirrel trying not to get run over by a car.

The eyes are one of the most precious tools in our bodies. We use them not only to see but to communicate. There is a connection there when you look at someone in the eyes. When you stare into a pair of meth eyes, you are immediately filled with a sense that something is wrong.

The ocular effects in meth users can be easy to spot even if you have limited knowledge of meth addiction. The rapid eye movement, the pale skin, the sores, all of these make for a morbid physical appearance. My vision impairment was off the charts when I was using meth heavily. The rapid eye movement made me feel like I could never have one peaceful moment.

Your Meth Addiction Only Has You Fooled

Meth Addiction

Despite how obvious my condition was, I still felt like I was fooling everyone. That’s one of the biggest tricks that drug addiction plays on addicts. You think you can fool everyone. At first, you can, but the cracks begin to appear quickly and there isn’t much you can do to hide it after a while.

As I looked at the world through meth eyes and blurred vision, I looked for everyone and everything to blame but myself. It’s because of all the other external forces in my life that got me to this point. It’s hard to accept blame, even harder if you’ve been in the thick of methamphetamine addiction.

This is a common symptom of drug addiction. This is all across the drug spectrum. Whether you have an issue with prescription drugs, alcohol, or an illicit drug like meth. Drug abuse is related all across the board.

The Power Of Methamphetamine Drug Use

I never imagined I would end up in the situation that I did. As I mentioned above, drug addiction is something that has always existed in my family. I saw a lot of family members abuse alcohol and drugs.

It freaked me out when I was young, and I promised myself and the few sober family members that I had that that would not be me. Drugs would not enter my life at all. When you’re on the outside looking in, it can be easy to say that you won’t do the same.

Just saying it doesn’t make it possible. Even as you go through addiction treatment, the drug can still talk through you. The adverse effects that methamphetamine use has on your mind can be even more glaring once you stop using the drug.

Beyond the eye damage and the other side effects, the mental effects are extremely difficult to navigate. Meth use takes over your mind to a point that is terrifying. I look back on some of my decision-making and can’t believe that I was capable of some of the things that I did.

The All Consuming Effects Of Meth

The effects of meth can turn you into a person you won’t recognize. I put myself in a lot of life-threatening situations. I associated with some very questionable individuals and pushed away all of the positive people in my life. When my meth use was at its peak, I was sleeping on the streets and committing petty crimes to feed my habit. ‘

I never conceived that my meth use would have me sneaking into businesses and stealing merchandise. As I gave myself over more and more to the methamphetamine drug, I rationalized every horrible decision that I made. I made myself not care about the people that I was affecting.

The long-term effects of meth have followed me even well into my sobriety. I still get the urge to use it, and I still see myself falling back into my old crowd. I feel guilty sometimes that I got out of it while so many others didn’t. This is a common sign in recovery. It’s a form of survivor’s guilt that I continue to struggle with, but through treatment, I’ve learned to accept it and manage it.

The Lies Of Drug Abuse

Drug Abuse

When I entered my teen years, I engaged in alcohol abuse, which slowly progressed into cocaine addiction. I realized that uppers were my thing. It wasn’t long after I first got into cocaine that I began using crystal meth. This is before I graduated high school. My father was sober at this point and pressured me into addiction treatment.

I couldn’t really say no, because I was still living under his roof. I did it because I was forced into it, which typically never works out. To get over substance abuse, you have to want it for yourself. Meth use isn’t going to fix itself.

I remember my father once asking me about my rapid eye movements, and why I couldn’t sit still without obsessively shifting around. I felt attacked, and would usually blow up at him ending the conversation.

I didn’t want it. I wanted the drug. My methamphetamine addiction was in its infancy. Of all the illicit drugs that I and my peers were into, crystal methamphetamine was to me the greatest substance in the world. Something I needed to get through my day. When I didn’t have it, it was a living hell. No one tries to be a crystal meth addict.

Methamphetamine Myths

Substance use disorder makes you believe all of the lies that the drug is telling you. It doesn’t matter what drug you are addicted to. Each of them has different effects and different ways that they change the brain, but overall, substance abuse in general changes your brain for the worse. Every time someone tried to help me or talk sense into me, I felt attacked and offended.

I made up excuses. I lied. I projected and tried to turn it back on them. There was no talking any sense into me. Even as my symptoms presented themselves in such an obvious fashion, I still couldn’t admit I had a problem.

The drugs were doing the talking, not me. It wasn’t until I was in treatment at Pathfinders that I could speak for myself. Meth abuse isn’t much different than alcohol abuse or any other type of substance abuse.

The Effects Of Meth On Everyday Life

Because meth is a stimulant, it’s much different than any central nervous system depressant. You don’t sleep on meth. I’ve gone days without sleeping, and it feels like you are literally in a nightmare.

There isn’t any other highly addictive drug that I feel can put you into that state of psychosis. If you are dealing with a mental illness of any kind, it can shake things up. Not only that, the withdrawal symptoms can greatly increase your psychosis. Meth is the one drug that made me feel like I had lost my mind.

Methamphetamine Abuse And Your Body

Methamphetamine Abuse

Meth addiction creates some very complex problems in your brain. The effects of meth on your mind are brutal and hard to describe unless you’ve been through it. First, let’s get into the physical symptoms.

Beyond meth eyes, meth mouth is a serious and potentially life-threatening side effect. Meth users grind their teeth, and the chemicals from the drug do a lot of damage to your gums if consumed orally.

There is an increased risk of high blood pressure, vision impairment, vision loss, changes in body temperature, and retinal vascular occlusive disease. I developed a retinal vascular occlusive disease, which affected my vision. This occurs when there is a blood clot in the veins around your eyes.

Methamphetamine use increases your risk of poor blood flow and high heart rate. All of this combined throws your body into a tailspin. What negative effects does your body try to fight first? The central nervous system can only handle so much of the effects of meth.

Meth and Body Temperature

The way methamphetamine made my body temperature rise and fall was shocking. Beyond the vision impairment, skin sores, and rapid eye movement, I always felt like I was being put in and out of an oven. Meth interrupts blood flow and

Your physical health and mental health are very closely related. One doesn’t work all that well without the other. Health problems greatly affect your mood and general disposition. When you’re using crystal meth or any other drug, you’re sapping your brain of dopamine. The dopamine receptors in your brain greatly affect your emotions.

Drug abuse puts these receptors into overdrive until they can no longer produce any more dopamine. When your brain is emptied of dopamine, it can create some real havoc. The support groups that I was a part of in my initial recovery were so great at teaching me about the way methamphetamine made me feel.

Even long after I stopped using the drug, I still felt the effects. This is one of the common symptoms of those in recovery. Just because you got clean, doesn’t mean you’re not going to desire that feeling again.

Addiction Treatment and Meth Use

Both prescription and illegal drug abuse require a lot of support. Getting clean is a decision you make on your own, but you need a lot of help along the way. The support groups I have joined have given me a great sense of purpose and responsibility.

Addiction Treatment

I try and stay clean not just for myself, but so I can help someone else see that it is possible. I no longer see the world through meth eyes. Crystal methamphetamine turned me into a person that I don’t want to become again, but I know it’s not out of the realm of possibility.

I may not be engaging in meth use now, but I can’t predict the future. I try to live moment by moment and help others see it that way too. Ultimately though, I’m only in control of my own life. I work on myself first before anyone else.

Long Term Effects After Treatment

The effects of meth are still with me, but I try to use them as a tool to help others. I may have gotten over my physical effects, but there are long-term effects that last well into recovery. The retinal vein occlusion is gone, but the effects linger. Meth seems like it will always be a part of my life, whether I still use it or not.

When I was going through my initial treatment at Pathfinders, I knew I had made the right decision even if the withdrawal symptoms were tearing me apart inside. I had tried treatment many times over the years, but never truly wanted it for myself.

A Journey of Recovery from Methamphetamine

Being in treatment has given me a new lease on life, and I make sure every day that I’m doing the best I can to not go back to methamphetamine. The long-term effects of meth may be there, but I know that it’s something I can handle if I put in the work.

If you are struggling with meth, or have a loved one that is, reach out to Pathfinders and ask about your options. I know it may seem scary, but I was pretty far gone, and they helped me find a strength and hope I thought were long gone. I bet they can help you find them too, all it takes is a phone call to get the ball rolling and claim your own recovery!