Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies

Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies Pathfinders Recovery Center - A family all holding hands together, an analogy for exploring the link between family genetics and addiction tendencies.

We often hear of people having an addictive personality, or even that addiction runs in families.

It does bring up the question: “Why does one person get addicted to drugs or alcohol and another doesn’t? Is addiction linked to genetics?”

Is it possible to be predisposed to addiction? Is there a genetic link to addiction? If your parent or relative struggles with drug or alcohol addiction, do family genetics mean there’s no hope for you?

We’re going to answer all of these questions for you in this article.

Keep reading to learn about the genetic predisposition to addiction and general addiction tendencies based on your DNA.

What Is Addiction?

The American Society of Addiction Medicine states that addiction is a direct effect of the reward and motivational part of our brains being affected by an overwhelming need to “pursue reward or relief by substance use and behaviors.”

Alcohol addiction is one of the most common addictions in the United States.

An estimated 15.1 million people have an alcohol use disorder (AUD).

While most of us immediately think of alcoholism when we think of addiction, you can be addicted to many different substances and/or behaviors.

Some other examples of common addictions include:

  • Tobacco
  • Opioids
  • Sex
  • Cocaine
  • Benzos
  • Gambling

Any substance or behavior that affects your pleasure and/or reward system in the brain has the potential to become an addiction.

Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies Pathfinders - A husband and father is pouring another drink at the dining room table while his wife and daughter stand behind him depressed and watching him suffer with his alcoholism, as he wonders whether addiction is linked to genetics or not before seeking treatment.

Is Addiction a Disease?

Addiction is defined as a chronic disease of the brain that affects you mentally, physically, and socially.

Addiction directly disrupts normal brain function that impairs your judgment, learning, motivation, memory, and reward/relief systems.

Genetic Links to Addiction

As with other diseases, there are a number of factors that contribute to the development of the disease.

These factors include social settings, environmental factors, behavioral factors, and family genetics.

Let’s get a little bit more into the genetic predisposition associated with addiction.

“Addiction Genes”

There has been a scientific effort to uncover the specific genes that would result in addiction and drug abuse disorders.

This brings up two questions: “Why would there be genes for addiction anyway? If addiction is so harmful, shouldn’t those types of genes have already been eliminated from our population due to natural selection?”

Some argue that “addiction genes” may have helped our early ancestors to promote motivation and feelings of pleasure/reward for things like gathering food, procreating, etc. Once these genes are in place to reward us, it can affect how we behave with other things that give us pleasure, like drugs and alcohol.

There has been some success in finding particular “addiction genes.” As with most things concerning genetics, there is no one specific “addiction gene.” Instead, it’s a complex system of different genes and chemicals that can lead to addictive tendencies.

One common gene found in many drug addicts and alcoholics is a gene that affects dopamine receptors in the brain, specifically the DRD2 gene.

Dopamine is this “feel good” chemical in your brain. When you do something pleasurable (like drugs), your brain releases dopamine, which makes you feel good and makes you want to do more of that thing.

If your dopamine receptors are changed or more receptive to dopamine, it could make it easier to become addicted to drugs.

This is just one example of a potential “addiction gene” found by scientists. Hundreds of other genes can contribute to a predisposition to addiction. See some more examples here.

Twin Studies

Some of the most telling facts about addiction and genetics are genetics looking at family history and relatives with addiction.

Studies show that genetics amount to up to 50% of the likelihood that you’ll develop an addiction.

How do we know this? One study looked at over 1,000 sets of twins. Identical twins have the same genetic make-up. Therefore, if addiction were solely genetic, we would assume that if one twin had a substance abuse issue, the other twin would as well.

However, they found that if one twin had an addiction, the other twin was likely to have an addiction. But, they found that if one twin had an addiction, it didn’t mean the other twin had an addiction too.

In simple terms, this study found that genes have a large factor in addiction since the likelihood of twins having an addiction was high.

However, when one twin had an addiction, many of their twins with the same genes did not have an addiction.

This indicates that other factors that contribute to addiction besides genetics, even if addiction is linked to genetics.

Other studies support these findings.

This leads to the consensus that genetics amount to half of the predisposition/risk of developing an addiction.

Children of Parents Struggling with Addiction

When thinking about addiction’s genetic component, we have to look at the history of drug addiction in families.

One of the easiest ways to study the genetic links to addiction is to look at the children of those struggling with addiction.

These individuals struggling with substance abuse pass on their genes to their children. So, if there is a genetic link, logic tells us that the children of these individuals should also have substance abuse issues at one point or another. They should at least be at a much higher risk of addiction compared to children of those that do not have drug or alcohol issues.

And studies have found that this is, in fact, the case.

Children of those struggling with addiction are eight times more likely also to develop an addiction than children of individuals without substance abuse issues.

Another study showed that people who use drugs are more likely to have at least one parent that also uses drugs.

Is It Really Genetics? Digging Deeper

After everything we’ve just gone over, from the specific genetic findings to the family statistics, you might think it’s definite that genetics is the factor that causes addiction.

While it’s true addiction is linked to genetics, there are questions related to how much this means in terms of genetic predisposition.

However, we can’t ignore the behavioral and social aspects of family life that have nothing to do with genetics.

Children growing up with parents who normalize drug and alcohol use may simply use drugs because socially, it seemed normal. This doesn’t have to do with their genes; it has to do with their social environment.

While family statistics and studies show a link between genetics and addiction, it’s also important to remember that addiction is a complex disease with many factors, including social and behavioral factors.

Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies Pathfinders - A man struggling with substance abuse has decided to enter treatment after learning that addiction is linked to genetics and his parents struggled with addiction. He is taking part in an initial group therapy session to discuss his story and gain insight for healthy coping mechanisms to break free from addiction.

Other Factors that Can Lead to Addiction

Continuing with this idea, let’s look at some other factors that can contribute to addiction besides “addiction genes.”

Some of the most significant risk factors for addiction include:

  • Stress
  • Mental health disorders, such as depression, eating disorders, anxiety, etc.
  • Emotional/physical trauma
  • Peer pressure
  • Pop culture exposure
  • Easy access to drugs/alcohol
  • Social environment

Predisposition Is Not Certainty

This brings us to a very important point.

Just because you’re predisposed or have a higher risk of developing an addiction doesn’t mean you definitely will.

Your entire family could struggle with alcohol and drug abuse, and you could have multiple “addiction genes.”

But this does not mean addiction is inevitable for you.

If you feel you have many risk factors and can feel yourself potentially going down the wrong path, you can learn coping skills and enter treatment before an addiction develops.

Understanding your risks as a child or relative of someone who struggles with substance abuse can be a way to regulate your drug use. It can also help you understand you’re predisposed to addiction, which might motivate you to seek help before things get worse.

Each of these factors could lead to a higher risk of addiction, no matter what genes you have.

Addiction is complex and is the result of not one but many factors.

Genetics could be a big part of what leads someone down the addiction path, but it’s not the only factor. Although it is still essential to be aware that addiction is linked to genetics.

Family Genetics and Addiction: Bottom Line

You’ve probably heard that alcoholism is a family disease, and on some level, that’s true.

Addiction is linked to genetics and drug abuse disorders.

However, it’s also important to recognize that addiction is a complex disease that cannot be pinpointed on one factor or cause. It’s a myriad of social and biological triggers that come together to form the perfect storm known as addiction.

If you or a family member is struggling to stay sober, contact us today.

We can help those suffering from addiction overcome their reliance and live a healthier, more stable life.

 

What are Some Common Signs of a Drug Addict?

The Signs of a Drug Addict

Information regarding the signs of a drug addict is critical due to its prevalence in America.

Addiction to drugs is an epidemic that kills thousands of people every year.

Drug addiction transforms and hurts people’s lives.

If you think someone you know is susceptible to drug use or addiction, you should learn more about the signs, symptoms, and treatments for drug addiction.

Though addiction to drugs is hurtful and demanding to maintain, recovery is not an easy path either.

Drug addiction changes the brain’s pathways, causing a dependency in the body and compulsive use of the substance.

Even when addiction is hurting them and those they love, someone struggling with an addiction to drugs feels like they have no choice but to continue to use.

Learning and memorizing the signs of an addict or the signs of an addictive personality is essential for prevention and recovery.

Having this knowledge allows you to keep an eye out for those you love who may be vulnerable to drug addiction.

MedlinePlus lists the following as signs of a drug addict:

  • Changes in appetite
  • Loss of interest in favorite things
  • Spending a lot of time alone
  • Not practicing self-care
  • Quick changes in mood
  • Being very tired and sad
  • Changing friends more than usual
  • Having a lot of energy, chattering
  • Having issues in work or school
  • Having issues with family or friends

What are Some Common Signs of a Drug Addict? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of individuals in inpatient rehab that showed signs of a drug addict and decided to enter treatment is discussing experiences in their lives, healthy coping mechanisms, and supportive advice for one another as they work toward recovery and long-term sobriety.

Understanding the Signs of a Drug Addict

Knowledge of the signs of an addict is constructive, but it is crucial to know the next steps and how addiction occurs if you believe someone you love may suffer from addiction.

Drug addiction can develop quickly over a short period or slowly and invisibly. When a person begins using drugs, the effects on the body are intense and euphoric. Over time, if a person continues usage, the body needs more and more of the substance to produce a high.

Addiction forms when the body is dependent on the substance and usage is no longer voluntary. Drug use turns compulsive, and addicts feel as if they need the substance to survive. If that person discontinues the use of the drug, the body experiences intense withdrawal symptoms.

Certain people are more susceptible to drug addictions.

This information helps prevent drug use and addiction because concerned family members can implement positive drug-avoidance strategies.

MedlinePlus lists the following as risks for drug addiction:

  • Individual biology: some people are only less likely to enjoy drug use. If someone tries drugs once and hates them, they are much less likely to form an addiction. Addiction is more common in people who enjoy drug use.
  • Mental health issues.
  • Trouble at home: children, adults, and teens who have a difficult home life are more likely to develop a drug addiction.
  • Trouble with school, work or making friends.
  • Spending time with people who use drugs.
  • Starting drug use at a young age.

If you noticed these symptoms in a friend or a family member, speak to someone responsible and knowledgeable about these concerns.

Preventative measures or early interventions help stop addiction from forming.

After addiction forms, it is incredibly challenging to recover from.

If you believe you may help someone prevent addiction, acting sooner rather than later could save a life.

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Effects and Abuse of Drugs

Though it is best to prevent addiction early on, this is not always a possibility. Sometimes, the forming of habit is not an easy thing to see. By the time family members or friends spot the signs of an addict, addiction is already present.

Addiction causes both short and long-term effects on the body and mind. Familiarizing yourself with these effects allows you to help secure treatment for the person you think may struggle with addiction. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) lists the long and short-term risks of drug addiction as follows:

Short-term risks:

  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Overdose
  • Changes in sleep patterns, mood, heart rate, and appetite

Long-term increased risks:

  • Heart or lung disease
  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis
  • Mental illness

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Mental Illness and Drug Abuse

Drug abuse and mental illness commonly occur together in the same patient. Drug addiction often leads to mental illness and vice-versa. They are sometimes direct causes of one another, or they can develop together. They may occur together because they affect the same parts of the brain, according to the NIDA. It is also possible for people to turn to drugs because their mental disorder has made them feel upset, anxious, or distracted. Because of these factors, mental illnesses are sometimes signs of an addictive personality.

If mental illness and drug addiction occur together, patients must receive treatment for both issues. The presence of mental illness makes a recovery from drug addiction more difficult if not adequately addressed and treated. It is possible to overcome both mental health issues and drug addiction through treatment.

Common mental health issues to watch out for include:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • ADHD
  • Bipolar disorder

What are Some Common Signs of a Drug Addict? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A young man is sitting with an addiction specialist for an initial consultation to determine if he has the signs of a drug addict and if he requires treatment.

Treatment for the Signs of a Drug Addict

People who display the signs of an addict receive treatment from the expert staff at hospitals or rehabilitation centers. Treating drug addictions is in no way simple; relapse is common, and the body’s compulsive need for the drug makes maintenance of recovery extremely challenging. Though relapse often occurs and makes recovery much more challenging, it does not mean that treatment has not helped and recovery is impossible.

In fact, recovery is still possible even after multiple relapses.

According to the NIDA, there are three main goals of addiction treatment:

  1. Stopping drug use
  2. Maintaining a drug-free life
  3. Becoming or continuing to be a productive member of society.

Treatment is adjusted to fit what works best for each patient, so it involves trial and error.

Common treatments for the signs of a drug addict include medication, participation in support groups, counseling to diagnose mental health issues, and therapy.

In therapy, patients focus on understanding the reasons they became addicted to drugs in the first place. Therapy also teaches patients how to remain drug-free and avoid relapse. Support groups provide patients with an essential sense of camaraderie. Being surrounded by understanding people who have experienced similar things has excellent healing potential.

Recovery can last a lifetime, so long-term care is sometimes needed to prevent relapse.

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Payment for Treatment

We know that it is not easy to afford treatment.

Because drug addiction rehabilitation can be expensive, we provide free insurance verification for every client. Our insurance verification allows you to find out immediately whether your insurance company covers rehab so that you can figure out financing.

Though it is demanding, recovery is possible with the right resources and support networks. Our dedication is to our patients and their recovery.

Though we cannot guarantee that every patient will recover, our focus always rests on providing the patients with knowledge, care, and compassion to ensure the best recovery chance.

Please do not hesitate to reach out to us if you think you or someone you love displays signs of a drug addict or signs of an addictive personality.

We are here to help.

Opioid Alternatives: How to Find Pain Medications That Aren’t Addictive

Opioid Alternatives: How to Find Pain Medications That Aren't Addictive Pathfinders - An image of a prescription of opioids that are highly addictive and can lead to opioid abuse and addiction, which is why it is recommended to seek out opioid alternatives for pain relief.

Every day 116 people die of an opioid drug overdose. And 42,249 people died of prescription opioids in 2016.

These numbers are chilling.

What is even more chilling is that many of these deaths are preventable.

The problem is that prescription opioids are seen as one of the only ways of coping with chronic pain. And people are rarely offered non-opioid alternatives.

Many individuals in recovery for opioid abuse fear that treating pain with opioids will lead to relapse.

However, it does not have to be this way. Many opioid alternatives can provide lasting pain relief with none of the risks.

Since opioids are so commonly used, you may ask yourself: “Aren’t they the best method to treat pain?”

The answer is no.

Opioid Alternatives: How to Find Pain Medications That Aren't Addictive Pathfinders - An image of a prescription of opioids that are highly addictive and can lead to opioid abuse and addiction, which is why it is recommended to seek out opioid alternatives for pain relief.

A 2017 study showed that there was no difference between opioid and non-opioid treatment for pain management.

Opioid alternatives — like ibuprofen and acetaminophen — performed as well as opioids when treating leg and arm pain. And beyond addiction, opioids have many other side effects, including constipation, nausea, vomiting, and adrenal problems.

There are many ways of treating pain without addiction or side effects.

Let’s look at a few opioid alternatives to help you manage pain safely.

Non-Opioid Painkillers

Many addicts fear that pain relief and drug relapse go hand in hand.

But there are many non-opiate painkillers for addicts.

From drugs that treat inflammation and injuries to drugs that treat chronic pain, there are opioid alternatives.

Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

Most people know drugs like Acetaminophen and Ibuprofen by their brand names, Tylenol and Advil.

These medications are usually associated with treating mild headaches or migraines.

However, most people don’t know they can be serious non-opiate painkillers.

These drugs are considered NSAIDs or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

They work by acting directly on the injured body tissue to reduce prostaglandins, which causes increased inflammation after an injury.

NSAIDs function differently than opioids, which act on the central nervous system. The opioids bind to the opioid receptors in the brain, decreasing the brain’s awareness of pain. This leads to a euphoric feeling that can become addictive.

Though these drugs are non-addictive and are typically safer than opioids, they still have side effects like liver damage, stomach irritation, kidney problems, and bleeding problems.

Another serious side issue is the ceiling effect. This means that once you have increased the dosage to a certain point there is a limit or “ceiling” to how effective these drugs are.

As a result, these drugs are not recommended for chronic pain sufferers.

Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs)

Chronically ill patients are especially at risk for opioid addiction.

This is because the long-term use of opioids increases the risk of becoming dependent. It may also be because many non-opioid drugs are not approved for long-term use.

However, for people suffering from chronic diseases, like fibromyalgia and chronic back or knee pain, there are opiate alternatives.

For example, Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs) work by decreasing sensitivity to pain by interfering with the spinal cord’s pain suppression pathways.

The practice of using these drugs has already become popular.

One SNRI, Duloxetine, is already widely prescribed as a treatment for chronic pain.

Though Duloxetine works well for chronic pain, it has side effects like loss of appetite, constipation, and fatigue.

With many individuals that struggle with opioid addiction looking for opioid alternatives, drugs like Duloxetine provide a second chance at life.

Tricyclic Antidepressants

Tricyclic antidepressants are drugs that treat chronic pain and depression.

These drugs work effectively because chronic pain and depression have similar neurological makeup and often affect similar parts of the brain.

They work by controlling the output of serotonin and norepinephrine. They also regulate the function of the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus.

One benefit of using antidepressants to treat pain is that it can also help treat the depression that accompanies opioid abuse.

Anticonvulsants

Anticonvulsants are usually only thought of as anti-seizure medications.

However, they can also function as powerful opioid alternatives for those struggling with opioid abuse. They work by interfering with the pain signals sent from oversensitive or damaged nerve cells.

Though anticonvulsants are relatively safe, they do carry some risks. These drugs can affect levels of vitamins C, D, E, B6, and B22. They can also cause nausea, dizziness, weight gain, and fatigue.

Some of the newer drugs have fewer side effects. For example, drugs like Gabapentin and Pregabalin have successfully treated pain caused by spinal cord injuries.

Corticosteroids

Many people think athletes and bodybuilders typically use steroids or that extra boost in performance and muscle.

However, many people are unaware that steroids have been and continue to be used for pain management.

Because of their anti-inflammatory properties, they can be used to treat joint damage, nerve damage, and soft tissue damage.

What makes corticosteroids different than opioids is that they work on a cellular level. They bind to a cell, change gene expression, and control cellular function. This allows for the management of pain without the damaging effects of opioids.

Physical Opioid Alternatives

For people afraid of the side effects of pills, there many opioid alternative treatments that provide pain relief.

Physical Therapy

A great pain management option to talk to your doctor about is physical therapy.

Physical therapy allows for treating an injury or illness with exercise and massage, instead of surgery or drugs.

It also allows for more long-term pain management and recovery.

Physical therapy can often require more work on the part of the patient.

It requires attending sessions. In many cases, you will also have to perform exercises at home.

For people living without reliable transportation or in areas where physical therapists are rare, it can be challenging to access this type of treatment. Some physical therapists will travel to you, so it is important to consider all of your available options.

Physical therapy can improve healing and can provide long-term pain relief.

Opioid Alternatives: How to Find Pain Medications That Aren't Addictive Pathfinders - A middle-aged man is engaging in physical therapy with a professional physical therapist as one of the available opioid alternatives to manage pain and improve the healing process instead of abusing opioid medications.

Acupuncture

One of the safest ways of treating pain without side effects is acupuncture.

Though acupuncture is often regarded as pseudoscience, there is evidence showing it can help treat pain.

One study found that acupuncture worked and medicine in providing long-term pain relief for patients who came into the emergency room.

Scientists have found that acupuncture can change the way the brain processes and perceives pain.

Chiropractic Care

Chiropractic care is another alternative to opioids that has minimal side effects.

Chiropractic care is a part of the medical profession that focuses on the spine and its function.

Most practitioners manipulate the spine to align the body and improve function. This makes it the perfect treatment for lower back pain, headaches, and neck pain.

Although many see chiropractic care with the same skepticism as acupuncture, there is plenty of evidence to show that it is safe and effective. For example, 95% of chiropractic users report that chiropractic care has helped them manage neck and back pain.

Consumer Report study showed that chiropractic care outperformed all other back pain treatments, including prescription and over-the-counter medication.

For people who want quick relief without addiction or side effects, chiropractic care may be the perfect option.

Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation TENS

One of the most interesting methods of pain relief is a TENS machine or a TENS unit. This machine essentially zaps the pain away.

A TENS machine, or a Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation, treats pain by passing an electrical current through the superficial tissue.

It is believed that the subtle vibrations may drown out the signals of pain that the nervous system is sending.

It may also work by stimulating healing in damaged tissue.

Another benefit of this treatment is that it’s relatively cheap. Each TENS machine is only $100 per unit. Therefore, you can get pain relief without opiates and without breaking the bank.

One of the main drawbacks of a TENS machine is that there is not much evidence to support its effectiveness. However, some experts are hopeful it can work for certain kinds of pain.

We Can Help With Opioid Addiction

For many individuals struggling with addiction, having a plan for dealing with pain can be one of the essential parts of preventing relapse.

Many opioid alternatives offer relief for almost every situation – from back pain to chronic pain.

We understand that drug addiction is a process.

If you or a loved one struggles to make your way through, contact our team of experts today.

Remember that help is always available.

 

The Behavior and Common Patterns of an Addict

The Behavior and Common Patterns of an Addict Pathfinders Recovery Center - A young addict is laying in a street corner as he begins to experience withdrawal symptoms from his substance abuse.

What is an Addict?

While you may have heard about rising addiction rates, you might not fully understand what an addict actually is.

An addict is someone who has an addiction to a drug or to alcohol.

These addictions can form in various ways — from prescription drug misuse or recreational substance use.

No matter what led to a person becoming an addict, there are many different ways addiction can affect their lives and the people around them.

These effects have serious long-term negative physical and mental effects.

This is what makes having access to quality addiction treatment centers so important.

The Behavior and Common Patterns of an Addict Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of those in recovery for being an addict and residing in residential treatment to learn healthy coping mechanisms to avoid substance abuse.

Understanding Addiction

Addiction is a serious, chronic disease because of the way substance abuse changes the brain. An addict’s brain makes them constantly crave, seek, and use substances, even when it is negatively affecting their health.

This is because alcohol and most drugs change the way that your brain releases the chemicals that make you feel happy and relaxed. Your brain learns to rely on a substance to release these chemicals, which makes it difficult for you to feel good from things you used to enjoy doing. Over time, you will need more of the substance to feel the effects.

This is what makes overdose such a major concern for addicts.

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Common Patterns within Addicts

No matter what substance an addict uses, they tend to have similar patterns in their behaviors. These behaviors can act as red flags to addicts and their friends and family members.

There are various signs you can look for to try and figure out if you or someone you know is an addict.

These signs include:

  • Having new friends frequently
  • Spending a lot of time alone
  • Stopping activities or hobbies you used to enjoy
  • Not taking care of your physical appearance
  • Having problems being tired or sad all of the time
  • Losing or gaining a significant amount of weight
  • Having too much energy
  • Talking fast or saying things that do not make sense
  • Often being angry, or having violent outbursts
  • Frequently changing between feeling bad and feeling good
  • Having a strange or unreliable sleep schedule
  • Having problems fulfilling your obligations at work or at school
  • Frequent strife within your personal relationships

Just one of these signs may not mean that someone is an addict. If you or someone you know is showing two or more of them, there is a chance an addiction is to blame.

Once you realize that you or someone you know is an addict, it is essential to start seeking out a drug rehab or alcohol rehab program.

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The Physical Effects of an Addiction

Drug and alcohol addiction can have many negative effects on an addict’s body. This is because our systems are not meant to process large amounts of drugs and alcohol on a regular basis.

This can lead to issues with many of an addict’s body processes and organs. The effects an addict experiences can vary depending on what they are abusing, how often they are using it, and how much they are taking.

Some common negative effects include:

  • Problems with the nose and lungs for people who snort drugs
  • Damage to the liver, kidneys, or heart
  • Damage to the lungs, which leads to breathing problems
  • A higher chance of cancer, including liver, throat, esophageal, breast, and kidney cancers
  • Short- or long-term problems with your brain
  • A higher chance of being infected with HIV or hepatitis from sharing needles or having unsafe sex
  • Needle marks, collapsed veins, and an increased chance of getting a serious skin, muscle, or blood infection from frequent injection or from using a dirty needle for those who inject drugs

While some effects of addiction are short-term and can be successfully treated by a doctor, others cannot. That is why it is critical for an addict to find help from a reputable rehab like Pathfinders Recovery Center.

 

The Behavior and Common Patterns of an Addict Pathfinders Recovery Center - An older man talks with an addiction specialist regarding his past as an addict and the need for addiction aftercare services.

Mental Illness and Alcohol Rehab

An addict’s substance abuse does not just pose a risk to their physical health. It can also have many different negative effects on their brain and mental health. These effects can include:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Mood swings
  • Problems dealing with stress
  • Angry or violent outbursts
  • A harder time learning new things
  • Short and long term memory loss
  • Poor judgment
  • Poor decision-making skills

These negative effects happen because of how drug abuse changes the way that your brain works. These effects can last for weeks or even months after an addict stops abusing drugs or alcohol.

For addicts who had an existing mental health issue before they became an addict, substance abuse can make their symptoms worse. Addicts often deal with serious depression and anxiety due to substance-related chemicals that imbalance their brains.

The only way these people feel better is by using drugs or alcohol. Once the effects wear off, they only feel worse. This leads addicts with mental health problems to use more and more drugs in order to try and treat their symptoms.

Going to rehab is the only way for addicts to finally get help for both their addiction and their mental health problems, known as a dual diagnosis treatment.

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Drug and Alcohol Rehab Treatment Options

There are many individuals struggling with addiction that tend to worry their addiction is too severe to be treated by a drug rehab or alcohol rehab program.

However, no matter how severe your addiction is, it is possible to get help and successfully overcome addiction.

Drug rehab treatment helps addicts get clean by avoiding the use of drugs and learning healthy ways to cope with stress and other triggers to avoid relapsing, and even potential overdoses.

There are many different drug rehab and alcohol rehab treatments available.

Some common rehab center treatments include:

  • Medical detox to assist in easing withdrawal symptoms
  • Behavioral therapies
  • Medications to lessen cravings or long-term withdrawal symptoms
  • Treatment for mental health issues
  • Tools and resources for long-term care to prevent relapse

For an addiction rehab program to be successful, it must be customized to suit the individual needs of every client. This is something that Pathfinders Recovery Center takes very seriously.

Each and every client that comes to us for help to overcome addiction gets the individualized attention they need by receiving a customized treatment plan based on a multitude of factors.

 

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Getting the Help You Need for Your Addiction

When someone is dealing with an addiction, it can be challenging for them to see how their addiction is affecting their health. It may also be hard for them to see that they can get help to lead a normal, sober life.

At Pathfinders Recovery Center, we know what it takes to get your life back to normal after addiction.

Our luxury locations provide you with a comfortable and home-like atmosphere so that our clients feel safe and secure throughout their treatment program.

We ensure your success by using only scientifically-proven, cutting-edge, and effective drug and alcohol addiction treatment programs.

We have over 25 years of experience in helping people with addictions and co-occurring disorders to overcome their addictions.

Many of our clients wonder whether or not they will be able to take advantage of their health insurance benefits to assist in covering their treatment. Simply give us a call, and one of our addiction specialists can perform a free insurance verification check to see how much of your treatment program will be covered by your insurance before you actually enter treatment.

No matter what addiction you may be struggling with, you do not have to keep dealing with the negative effects of this alone.

Let us use our years of experience to help you get on the path to a meaningful and lasting recovery.

Contact us today, and see the difference our rehab programs can make in getting your life back on track.

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals Pathfinders Recovery Center - A young woman is taking a Xanax pill because she is starting to experience withdrawals from Xanax.

About Withdrawals from Xanax

Withdrawals from Xanax occur when a person has an addiction to Xanax, a type of benzodiazepine (commonly known as ‘benzos’).

Patients are typically prescribed benzos to treat anxiety or mental health disorders where it acts as a calming agent.

Though addiction to benzos is not as common as addiction to other substances, like opioids and alcohol, addiction can still easily form.

Addiction to benzos is especially prevalent among people who suffer or have suffered from one addiction to a certain substance to another addiction to a different substance.

If you think you are suffering from addiction to Xanax or withdrawal from benzos, we are here to help.

Alprazolam, conversationally known as Xanax, is one of the most commonly prescribed benzos on the market.

Physicians prescribe Xanax to treat anxiety and panic disorders in their patients.

Its main effect is decreasing excessive excitement in the brain, according to MedlinePlus. It is also sometimes prescribed to treat depression.

For people struggling with anxiety, panic disorders, or depression, Xanax has the ability to changes lives for the better.

However, like with the use of any drug, overdose and addiction are both possible.

Addiction to Xanax occurs when a person increases the dose they need overtime to feel an effect.

Their body becomes dependent on the drug and needs it to function.

An overdose occurs when the dosage of Xanax taken is way too high.

An overdose of Xanax can be life-threatening.

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals Pathfinders Recovery Center - An individual is having an initial consultation with an addiction counselor to determine the right path of treatment after experiencing severe Xanax withdrawals.

Understanding Common Symptoms of Withdrawals from Xanax

When someone becomes addicted to Xanax, the body experiences withdrawal symptoms if you suddenly stop.

As Xanax is a prescription drug taken for years at a time, it has both short and long-term withdrawal symptoms.

Xanax withdrawal symptoms, according to the National Library of Medicine, include:

Short-Term:

  • Insomnia
  • Symptoms of anxiety or panic
  • Irritability
  • Hand tremor
  • Sweating
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Weight loss
  • Palpitations
  • Headache
  • Muscular pain and symptoms

Long-term withdrawal symptoms from benzos occur when symptoms last beyond the acute withdrawal period, which is also known as a “protracted withdrawal.”

Symptoms include prolonged depression, anxiety, and insomnia.

It is crucial to recognize that even prescription drugs often become addictive.

Though Xanax is beneficial for some people and can change lives for the better, doctors and patients should carefully control them.

People with a history of addiction are at much greater risk for developing an addiction to Xanax.

Make sure to inform your doctor about your medical history before the prescription of Xanax.

Your doctor may prescribe a special dosage regimen in conjunction with your daily life and habits to help better control the effectiveness of the drug without causing adverse effects.

It is essential to consider your doctor’s evaluation on the treatment he prescribes for you.

Immediate Placement in Xanax Rehab or Other Forms of Benzodiazepine Rehab – Get Help Now

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Effects and Abuse of Xanax

Xanax is a common prescription drug, meaning it is less addictive than other drugs found on the illegal market. However, if used for a prolonged period, the body may form a psychological or physical dependence on Xanax.

Increased tolerance for benzos also commonly leads to addiction. Over time, the body needs more of the substance to produce a calming effect, causing patients to take higher doses. These higher doses are what lead to the body’s dependence.

Though addiction is possible, Xanax abuse is much more common than an addiction to it. People who abuse Xanax are likely to be using another substance as well, such as opioids or alcohol.

The American Family Physician states that an estimated 80% of benzos abuse happens in conjunction with the use of another drug (commonly opioids). The use of benzos is typically regular for abusers of opioids and meth. Some patients report combining alcohol with benzos to achieve their desired effect.

It is significant to note that Xanax is not for people to use in conjunction with other drugs and substances.

High dosages of Xanax or other types of benzos cause dependence over time. When use stops rapidly, intense Xanax withdrawal symptoms occur. Long-term use leads to a compulsive psychological need for the drug, causing loss of confidence and anxiety symptoms when patients stop using.

Learn More About Rehab for Benzos at Pathfinders: Call Today

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Mental Illness and Withdrawals from Xanax

Because Xanax most commonly treats mental illnesses, such as anxiety, panic disorder, and even depression, people with mental illnesses are much more susceptible to addiction and withdrawals from Xanax.

People with mental illness are at a higher risk for drug misuse and addiction. Drugs and mental illness sometimes affect the same parts of the brain, and people experiencing mental illness often take drugs to deal with their condition’s difficulties.

Xanax prescription and use require a tricky balance. Why? People with anxiety and panic disorders are statistically more likely to develop addictions, but Xanax is most effective in treating this disorder. Because of this, Xanax is prescribed only by physicians who take careful notes about patient history to ascertain safe dosage amounts and avoid dependency.

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of individuals in residential rehab for Xanax withdrawals is attending a group therapy session led by an addiction specialist to learn how to live a Xanax-free lifestyle.

Treatment of Withdrawals from Xanax

Like many other addictive drugs, treatment for Xanax withdrawal symptoms is available at rehabilitation centers, like Pathfinders Recovery Center.

At reputable treatment centers, patients receive medication to help ease Xanax withdrawals, while also providing treatment plans and behavioral therapy. Attendance of support groups also helps patients establish a sense of community as they know others who also struggle with addiction.

According to research from the NCBI, for patients with an established addiction or dependency, it is useful to switch to a long-acting benzodiazepine and continue reducing the dosage until none remains. This process helps avoid severe withdrawal symptoms, like seizures. Drug and alcohol rehab centers offer multiple types of treatment, including safer substitution medication and psychotherapies.

Our main goal is always to supply patients with the resources they need to recover from addiction and overcome Xanax withdrawal symptoms at our treatment centers.

Though we cannot guarantee recovery, choosing to attend rehab at one of our facilities gives you a fighting chance for a better life. We offer each person unique treatments, getting to know our patients to determine which type of treatment fits best. At our treatment centers, you have the chance to meet others with similar experiences and establish a feeling of camaraderie. With treatment, recovery is attainable.

Free Insurance Verification for Xanax Rehab – Get Help Now

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Payment for Treatment

We understand paying for treatment for withdrawal from Xanax adds more stress to addiction pressures and difficulties.

Because of this challenge, we offer free insurance verification to know where you stand with financing treatment.

We want to make this burdensome process as smooth as possible for you.

If you are struggling with an addiction to benzos or Xanax, you have come to the right place.

We established our treatment program to help people struggling with addictions, and we dedicate ourselves to the cause.

Our network of understanding and experienced staff helps create a positive sense of community with our patients.

Always remember that recovery from your addiction is possible.

Freedom from addiction leads to a better and freer life that is no longer controlled by drugs.

Recovery is complicated and is not an assurance, but it is worth every challenge required to get there when achieved.

Reach out to find out more about treatment and how to begin your recovery journey.

Let us help you find a happier life.

Hydrocodone Addiction and Abuse

Hydrocodone Addiction and Abuse Pathfinders Recovery Center - A bottle of hydrocodone medications with pills laying in front of it, which often leads to hydrocodone addiction for many individuals.

What is Hydrocodone Addiction?

For people who are prescribed hydrocodone by their doctor, it could come as a surprise at just how easy it is to develop a hydrocodone addiction.

In fact, it can take just a few weeks to become addicted, especially if you are not taking this medication correctly.

Taking hydrocodone for long periods of time can also lead to hydrocodone addiction. You may start finding it is not working as well to control your pain or you have side effects when you are not taking the medication.

Hydrocodone addiction is a serious health problem across the nation leading to a rise in addictions, overdoses, and even deaths.

Understanding the Hydrocodone Abuse

Hydrocodone is an opioid prescribed to treat severe pain.

Most opioids are made from the opium poppy plant, though some are now made synthetically in labs. These drugs interact with areas in your brain and body called opioid receptors. This helps to relieve pain, and are great options for short-term pain management.

Opioids can have other side effects. They can also create a feeling of relaxation and euphoria. It is these side effects that often lead to hydrocodone abuse.

Hydrocodone abuse is when you take this medication more often than you are supposed to, in higher doses, or if you are taking it without a prescription. Hydrocodone abuse can quickly lead to an addiction, putting you at risk of an overdose and death.

Immediate Placement in Rehab for Hydrocodone Addiction – Get Help Now

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How Hydrocodone Abuse Affects Your Body

Like many types of medications, hydrocodone can cause side effects even when taken appropriately. If you have a problem with hydrocodone abuse, these side effects can be even more noticeable.

These effects can include:

  • Nausea
  • Dry mouth
  • Tiredness, difficulty staying awake, or insomnia
  • Headache
  • Back pain and stiff or sore muscles
  • Problems urinating
  • Swelling in the foot, leg, or ankle
  • Uncontrollable shaking

Long-term hydrocodone abuse can cause even more serious side effects. One of these effects is damage to your bowels. This is because hydrocodone causes constipation. Over time, this effect can cause issues like hemorrhoids.

Another serious side effect of hydrocodone abuse is called hypoxia. This is a condition that happens when opioids slow your breathing too much, and can even make you stop breathing. When this happens, your brain does not get enough oxygen. This can cause brain damage, coma, and even death.

Learn More About Hydrocodone Rehab at Pathfinders: Call Today

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Mental Illness and Hydrocodone Addiction

People who have a history of mental health issues are more likely to have a problem with hydrocodone abuse. This is especially true if you have ever experienced depression or anxiety or have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, panic disorder, or major depressive disorder — to name a few.

Some people try to treat their mental health symptoms by taking hydrocodone to feel more relaxed and happier. In the long run, this drug will actually make your symptoms worse.

If you are struggling with a hydrocodone addiction and mental health issues, it is very important that you receive treatment for both of these issues at a drug rehab facility that specializes in treating a dual diagnosis.

Hydrocodone Addiction and Abuse Pathfinders Recovery Center - An older man struggling with both hydrocodone addiction and a mental illness is speaking with an addition counselor to determine the right treatment for his specific needs,

What is Hydrocodone Withdrawal?

If you have a hydrocodone addiction, this means that your body is used to having it in your system. If you stop taking it, you can experience many different unpleasant symptoms.

These symptoms are called withdrawal. Withdrawal symptoms can begin as soon as a few hours after the last time you took it. When you have a hydrocodone addiction, these symptoms usually come in two parts.

The first part begins within the first day after you stop using. These symptoms can include:

  • Agitation
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Runny nose
  • Sleeplessness
  • Sweating

After another day or two, additional withdrawal symptoms can appear as well.

These are typically more uncomfortable and can include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Dilated pupils
  • Goosebumps
  • Nausea
  • Stomach cramps
  • Vomiting

The worst day of hydrocodone withdrawal is usually the third day. This is when symptoms usually peak before slowly fading. Most people that are going through hydrocodone detox will deal with withdrawals for a few days up to one week.

At Pathfinders Recovery Center, we have the option of a medical detox program. This allows us to help minimize your withdrawal symptoms so that the detox process is more comfortable and easier to get through.

Hydrocodone Addiction and Abuse Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of individuals that are struggling with hydrocodone addiction is discussing healthy ways to avoid relapse and maintain long-term sobriety.

The Risk of Experiencing an Overdose

One of the fastest-growing drug concerns in the United States today is that of opioid overdose.

Hydrocodone carries the same risk of overdose as any other opioid. This happens when someone uses this drug frequently or for an extended period of time. Your body gets used to the dosage of drugs you have been taking, and you have to take more in order to feel pain relief or to get high. As you increase your dosage, you are at a higher risk of accidentally overdosing. Your breathing and heart rate can slow down to dangerous levels, which can cause death.

An average of 100 people dies each day in the United States from an opioid overdose.

Symptoms of overdose may include:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Slowed or stopped breathing
  • Extreme sleepiness
  • Weakness in your muscles
  • Very narrow pupils
  • Cold, clammy skin
  • Passing out or coma

If you or anyone you know is showing signs of an opioid overdose, it is important to call for help immediately.

Without medical attention, a person can quickly die from an opioid overdose. Most paramedics today carry a drug called naloxone, which can be used to reverse an opioid overdose.

It must be administered as soon as possible after overdose symptoms appear in order to be effective.

24-Hour Hydrocodone Addiction Hotline – Get Help Now

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Treatment Options for Hydrocodone Addiction

When it comes to dealing with a hydrocodone addiction, it is important to get help as soon as you realize that you have a problem.

The longer you have a hydrocodone addiction, the higher the risk that you might experience an overdose.

We begin by sitting down with all of our clients in order to figure out which treatment options are going to be right for them.

We currently offer intensive outpatient, partial hospitalization, residential, and long-term drug rehab programs.

Once we have you placed into the right program, we can begin treatment.

The first step is getting you through detox so that all of the drugs are out of your body.

Afterward, we can begin your behavioral treatment with one of our highly-trained therapists.

We find a lot of success with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). CBT allows us to work with you to figure out the reasons behind your hydrocodone addiction, and how your thoughts influence your behaviors.

Then we give you tactics to avoid drug use triggers and to better manage stress. By getting the reasons behind why you have an addiction, we can help you create a plan for a positive recovery.

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Seek Help from a Trustworthy Drug Rehab

It does not matter if your hydrocodone addiction began with a doctor’s prescription or with recreational use.

This addiction has serious health consequences, which is why it is so important that you seek help at a drug rehab facility.

At Pathfinders Recovery Center, we know what it takes to get your life back from the adverse effects of addiction.

Our luxury locations provide you with a comfortable and home-like atmosphere so that our clients feel safe and secure throughout their treatment program.

We help ensure your success by using only scientifically researched, cutting edge, and effective drug and alcohol addiction treatment programs.

We have over 25 years of experience in helping people with addictions and co-occurring disorders to overcome their addictions.

Many of our clients wonder whether or not they will be able to take advantage of their health insurance benefits to help cover their treatment. That is why we accept most major insurances through our free insurance verification.

Simply give us a call and one of our addiction specialists can check to see how much of your treatment program will be covered by your insurance before you begin treatment.

You can trust us to communicate with your insurance provider to ensure that you receive every benefit that you are entitled to.

Addiction is a difficult thing to deal with both mentally and physically, but there is no reason you have to try and get clean by yourself. Let us use our years of experience to help you get on the path to a meaningful and lasting recovery.

Contact us today and see the difference we can make by helping you to become healthy once again.

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals Pathfinders Recovery Center - An individual is having an initial consultation with an addiction counselor to determine the right path of treatment after experiencing severe Xanax withdrawals.

About Withdrawals from Xanax

Withdrawals from Xanax occur when a person has an addiction to Xanax, a type of benzodiazepine (commonly known as ‘benzos’).

Patients are typically prescribed benzos to treat anxiety or mental health disorders as a calming agent.

Though addiction to benzos is not as common as addiction to other substances, like opioids and alcohol, addiction is still likely to form.

Addiction to benzos is especially prevalent among people who suffer or have suffered from addiction to another substance.

If you think you are suffering from addiction to Xanax or experiencing Xanax withdrawals, Pathfinders Recovery Center is here to help.

Alprazolam, conversationally known as Xanax, is one of the most commonly prescribed benzos on the market.

Physicians prescribe Xanax to treat anxiety and panic disorders for their patients.

Its main effect is decreasing excessive excitement in the brain, according to MedlinePlus.

It is also sometimes prescribed to treat depression.

For people struggling with anxiety, panic disorders, or depression, Xanax can have the ability to change lives for the better.

As with the use of any drug, however, overdose and addiction are both possible.

Addiction to Xanax occurs when a person increases the dose they need overtime to feel the effects of the substance.

Their body becomes dependent on the drug and needs it to function.

An overdose occurs when the dosage of Xanax taken is way too high.

An overdose of this benzodiazepine can be life-threatening.

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals Pathfinders Recovery Center - An individual is having an initial consultation with an addiction counselor to determine the right path of treatment after experiencing severe Xanax withdrawals.

Understanding Common Symptoms of Withdrawals from Xanax

When someone becomes addicted to Xanax, the body experiences withdrawal symptoms if you suddenly stop taking the medication. As Xanax is a prescription drug taken for years at a time, it has both short and long-term withdrawal symptoms.

Symptoms of Xanax withdrawals, according to the National Library of Medicine, include:

Short-Term:

  • Insomnia
  • Symptoms of anxiety or panic
  • Irritability
  • Hand tremor
  • Sweating
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Weight loss
  • Palpitations
  • Headache
  • Muscular pain and symptoms

Long-term withdrawal symptoms from benzos occur when symptoms last beyond the acute withdrawal period, which is also known as a “protracted withdrawal.” Symptoms include prolonged depression, anxiety, and insomnia.

It is crucial to recognize that even prescription drugs often become addictive. Though Xanax is beneficial for some people and can change lives for the better, doctors and patients should carefully monitor these prescriptions and patients. People with a history of addiction are at a much greater risk for developing an addiction to Xanax.

Make sure to inform your doctor about your medical history before any prescription is made. Your doctor may prescribe a special dosage regimen in conjunction with your daily life and habits to better control the effectiveness of the drug, without causing adverse effects. It is essential to consider your doctor’s evaluation of the treatment that has been set for you.

Immediate Placement in Rehab for Xanax Withdrawals – Get Help Now

855-728-4363

 

Effects and Abuse of Xanax

Xanax is a common prescription drug, meaning it is less addictive than other drugs found on the illegal market.

However, if used for a prolonged period, the body may form a psychological or physical dependence on Xanax. Increased tolerance for benzos also commonly leads to addiction. Over time, the body needs more of the substance to produce a calming effect, causing patients to take higher doses. These higher doses are what lead to the body’s dependence.

Though addiction is possible, abuse of Xanax is much more common than forming an addiction to it. People who abuse Xanax are likely to be using another substance as well, such as opioids or alcohol. The American Family Physician states that an estimated 80% of benzo abuse happens in conjunction with the use of another drug (commonly opioids).

The use of benzos is also regular for abusers of opioids and meth. Some patients report combining alcohol with benzos to achieve the desired effect. It is important to note that Xanax is not for people to use in conjunction with other drugs and substances.

High dosages of Xanax or other types of benzos can cause dependence over time. When use stops rapidly, intense Xanax withdrawal symptoms occur. Long-term use leads to a compulsive psychological need for the drug, causing loss of confidence and anxiety symptoms when patients stop using.

Learn More About Xanax Rehab at Pathfinders – Call Today

866-263-1847

 

Mental Illness and Withdrawals from Xanax

Because Xanax most commonly treats mental illnesses such as anxiety, panic disorder, and even depression, people with mental illnesses are much more susceptible to addiction and Xanax withdrawals.

Drugs and mental illness sometimes affect the same parts of the brain, and people experiencing mental illness often take drugs to deal with their condition’s difficulties.

Xanax prescription and use require a tricky balance. People with anxiety and panic disorders are statistically more likely to develop an addiction, but Xanax is most effective in treating this disorder.

Because of this, Xanax is only prescribed by physicians who take careful notes about patient history to ensure safe dosage amounts are prescribed and substance dependency is avoided.

24-Hour Xanax Withdrawals Rehab Hotline – Get Help Now

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Treatment of Withdrawals from Xanax

Like many other addictive drugs, treatment for Xanax withdrawal symptoms is available at rehabilitation centers, like the ones offered by Pathfinders Recovery Center.

At addiction treatment centers, patients receive medication to help with withdrawal and addiction, in addition to therapy and counseling. Attendance of support groups also helps patients establish a sense of community as they know others who struggle with addiction too.

According to research from the NCBI, for patients with an established addiction or dependency, it is helpful to switch to a long-acting benzodiazepine and continue reducing the dosage until one can safely taper off the medication. This process helps avoid severe withdrawal symptoms, like seizures.

Rehabilitation centers offer multiple types of treatment, including safer substitution medication and psychotherapies.

Our main goal is always to supply patients with the resources they need to recover from addiction and overcome Xanax withdrawal symptoms. Though we cannot guarantee recovery, choosing to attend rehab at one of our facilities gives you a fighting chance for a better life.

We offer each person unique treatments to get to know our patients in order to ascertain which type of treatment fits best.

At our treatment centers, you have the chance to meet others with similar experiences with addiction and establish a feeling of camaraderie. With treatment, recovery is attainable.

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of individuals in residential rehab for Xanax withdrawals is attending a group therapy session led by an addiction specialist to learn how to live a Xanax-free lifestyle.

Free Insurance Verification for Xanax Rehab – Get Help Now

855-728-4363

 

Payment for Treatment

We understand that paying for treatment for withdrawal from benzos adds more stress to addiction pressures and difficulties.

Because of this challenge, we offer free insurance verification to know where you stand with financing treatment.

We want to make this burdensome process as smooth as possible for you.

If you are struggling with an addiction to benzos or Xanax, you have come to the right place.

We established our treatment program to help people struggling with addictions, and we dedicate ourselves to the cause.

Our network of understanding and experienced staff helps create a positive sense of community with our patients.

Always remember that recovery from your addiction is possible.

Freedom from addiction leads to a better and freer life that is no longer controlled by drugs.

Recovery is complicated and is not an assurance, but it is worth every challenge required to get there when achieved.

Reach out to find out more about treatment and how to begin your recovery journey.

Let us help you find a happier life.

What Are Psychological Addictions?

What Are Psychological Addictions? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A young man is meeting with an addiction counselor to go over what psychological addictions are.

About Psychological Addictions

When people think of addictions, what usually comes to mind are addictive substances that predominantly affect the human body.

While most habits primarily affect the body, psychological addictions occur in the brain.

Psychological dependence involves becoming mentally fixated upon a substance or activity.

Such addictions can overrule your life and cause you to behave in a way that is not recognized by your loved ones.

It causes strong feelings or compulsions in the mind, making the addict feel as if they cannot go without the substance when, in reality, their body does not need it.

Dependency affects thought processes, making it difficult for people who are addicted to thinking about anything else.

Psychological addictions are sometimes more challenging to diagnose and address than physical addictions because they are not obvious.

While physical addictions cause outwardly visible symptoms of withdrawal, psychological addictions happen almost entirely within the mind.

There is less research and knowledge of psychological addictions because they are not as obvious.

What Are Psychological Addictions? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of individuals is attending a group therapy session led by an addiction specialist to go over what psychological addictions are.

Understanding Psychological Addictions

While the term “psychological addiction” is common, psychological dependencies are not strictly addictions. The traditional definition of the word “addiction” involves substance abuse that affects the body. However, the term has widened to include other compulsive behaviors such as gambling and non-physically addictive substances.

There is debate over some forms of psychological addictions, such as those caused by drugs not traditionally seen as addictive. Some scientists perceive marijuana addiction as psychological, while others argue it is a physical addiction.

Most users reporting addiction to marijuana, according to Indiana University, report a psychological dependency. Another drug that can cause psychological dependence is LSD, commonly referred to as “acid.” Though different from physical addictions caused by other substances like opioids and alcohol, psychological habits are still harmful.

Behavioral addictions are another type of psychological dependency. Addictions are often known as only involving substances, but they can and do affect various behaviors.

According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), many behavioral scientists believe that anything capable of stimulating someone also has addictive capabilities.

Addiction develops when a former habit becomes a compulsion. Activities susceptible to forming behavioral addictions include surfing the internet, gambling, playing video games, and watching videos or television. Psychological addictions occur behaviorally as well as with substance abuse.

It is crucial to remember that while psychological and physical addictions are two different things, changed mental processes occur both. The psychology of addictions is complex and still being studied.

Both physical and psychological dependence affect some brain processes, making addicts feel they cannot go without the drug. In physical addictions, the body experiences symptoms as well as the mind.

Physical and psychological addiction can occur together. When physical addiction occurs, it is very likely for the patient to have formed some mental dependency. Even if you no longer enjoy the substance, both your brain and body compulsively desire it.

While mental addiction sometimes occurs without physical addiction, it is less common for someone to be physically but not mentally addicted. When physical and psychological addiction occurs together, recovery becomes even more challenging to achieve.

Patients should receive treatment from both doctors and therapists in this case. Combining therapy, support groups, and medication is a common and effective treatment method for combined psychological and physical addictions.

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Effects and Abuse of Psychologically Addictive Substances

Continual use of psychologically addictive substances is harmful to the life of the addict. The body does not experience changes physically, but changes in behavior make life difficult. Physical symptoms in the body do not occur during a psychological dependency, but behavioral symptoms do. They include:

  • Compulsively feeling as though the person needs the drug or activity
  • Lack of interest in activities the person formerly enjoyed
  • Changed behavior toward work, school, family, or friends
  • Changes in mood

Learn More About Psychological Addictions at Pathfinders – Call Today

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Mental Illness and Psychological Addictions

If a mental illness is present in a person, addictions are much more likely to form. The term ‘dual diagnosis’ by MedlinePlus plays a role in the causation of substance abuse and mental health issues.

Psychological addiction is sometimes categorized as a form of mental health issue as it deals with compulsions and a perceived need for the substance or activity. If mental illness and psychological addiction are present, treatment is necessary for both conditions.

24-Hour Psychological Addictions Rehab Hotline – Get Help Now

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Treatment of Psychological Addictions

Treatment for psychological addiction is sometimes similar to the treatment of physical addiction. Counseling offered focuses on overcoming compulsions caused by mental dependency. Patients learn behavioral therapy and coping mechanisms such as CBT and how to deal with compulsions.

Psychologists often treat mental dependence by focusing on what caused the addiction in the first place. Sometimes, childhood trauma or repeated patterns can be a conversational aspect of the process. When patients can understand why they turned to the substance or behavior in the first place, recovery becomes much more attainable. This process allows patients to work on the deep-rooted issues causing their dependency.

Therapists and doctors at our recommended rehabilitation centers are knowledgeable, compassionate, and present with their patients. The psychology of addictions is a complicated and changing field still studied, but our staff is up-to-date and dedicated to helping you recover.

Though we wish we could guarantee recovery completely, this is never possible. Relapse is undoubtedly a common and prevalent issue, but it is imperative to know that it is sometimes part of the process. Relapse in a mental dependency does not mean you have failed. It merely means you need continued work on the mental issue.

What Are Psychological Addictions? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A young man is meeting with an addiction counselor to go over what psychological addictions are.

 

Free Insurance Verification for Psychological Addictions Rehab – Get Help Now

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Payment for Treatment

Treatment for psychological dependencies sometimes falls under insurance coverage, but this is not a guarantee.

We offer free insurance verification to help you find out quickly about payment for treatment.

We understand that figuring out how to pay for therapy or counseling is burdensome and difficult.

Both behavioral and substance addictions cost significant amounts of money to maintain.

Gambling and drugs are examples of incredibly addictive behaviors that create a financial burden.

Addictions often cause difficulty in paying for the rehabilitation or therapy that you desperately need.

Our greatest goal always remains to supply you with the assets you need for recovery.

Please do not fear to reach out to us to discuss insurance verification or payment for rehabilitation services.

Psychological addictions differ from physical addictions in that no physical symptoms occur.

Though the body is not affected by mental dependencies, they are still capable of causing emotional and behavioral difficulties.

Thousands of Americans suffer from psychological dependence on a substance or behavior.

It is important to remember that you are not alone, and that recovery from your addiction is possible.

Emotional distress caused by a mental dependency is real and has the capability of disrupting your life.

Recovery is a long and challenging journey.

We know that obstacles like relapse and financial difficulty cause recovery to feel distant and sometimes even impossible.

These are real risks associated with rehabilitation, but the only way of knowing whether recovery is possible is to try.

Your addiction does not have to continue.

You are capable of the work needed to achieve a peaceful and addiction-free life.

Contact us to learn more about psychological addiction and to begin your recovery today. We are here for you.

Xanax Abuse is On the Rise

Xanax Abuse is a Growing Problem

Xanax abuse is something to be concerned about, even though Xanax is a prescription medication.

The truth is that Xanax is one of the most commonly-prescribed drugs in its class, according to the authors of a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine.

While Xanax does belong to a class of medications called benzodiazepines, which have legitimate medical uses for the treatment of anxiety and panic, Xanax abuse is an unfortunate reality.

Experts warn that Xanax is incredibly addictive and should not be used for long periods of time.

Over time, Xanax abuse can lead to addiction and the need for drug rehab.

Immediate Placement in Xanax Rehab – Get Help Now

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Rates of Xanax Abuse

Research from the National Institute on Drug Abuse or NIDA shows just how common Xanax abuse has become.

According to a 2018 report from this organization, 30.5 million American adults use benzodiazepine drugs like Xanax.

Among benzodiazepine users, 17.1% of people misuse these drugs, which means that we can expect the rates of Xanax abuse to be considerably high.

Among those who abuse Xanax and other benzodiazepines, a little under 2% will develop a benzodiazepine use disorder.

This is the clinical term for an addiction to drugs like Xanax.

If Xanax abuse leads to a clinical addiction, drug rehab will likely be necessary.

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Reasons for Xanax Abuse

Some people take Xanax as prescribed by a doctor for an anxiety or panic disorder, but others engage in Xanax abuse. This can involve taking Xanax for reasons other than its intended uses or taking larger doses of Xanax than a doctor prescribes.

When prescribed Xanax, people should use caution and take the medication exactly as the doctor prescribes. Xanax abuse occurs when people do not follow a doctor’s directions.

There are various reasons for Xanax abuse. According to a research report from NIDA, almost half of people who abuse benzodiazepines such as Xanax misuse the drug to relax or relieve tension. Nearly 25% of people who abuse Xanax are trying to treat sleep problems.

Furthermore, slightly over 10% of people report Xanax abuse is a method to get high, and an additional 10% abuse Xanax helps them cope with their emotions. Finally, some people report that their Xanax abuse is a method of experimentation.

Regardless of the reasons for Xanax abuse, misusing this drug can lead to an addiction or substance use disorder.
Xanax Abuse is On the Rise Pathfinders - As one of the most widely prescribed drugs Xanax abuse is on the rise. It is easy to fall into addiction and need drug rehab for help.

Signs of a Substance Use Disorder

If Xanax abuse leads to addiction, it will be classified as a substance use disorder. NIDA has reported that symptoms include using larger amounts of Xanax than intended, being unable to cut back on Xanax use, or using Xanax when dangerous, such as while driving a vehicle.

Other signs that Xanax abuse has led to addiction include the following: spending a great deal of time using Xanax, giving up other activities in favor of Xanax abuse, or continuing to use the drug despite serious consequences, such as worsening physical or mental health, difficulty in relationships, or being unable to fulfill duties at work or home.

Once someone has developed a substance use disorder, Xanax rehab is needed to recover.

Xanax Abuse and Withdrawal

Another consequence of ongoing Xanax abuse is experiencing withdrawal. Xanax withdrawal occurs because, with regular use of the drug, the body will become physically dependent upon it. This means that when a person reduces Xanax abuse or tries to stop using the drug, the body will go through withdrawal symptoms as it adjusts to the absence of the drug.

Because Xanax abuse can lead to withdrawal, it is often necessary to seek the help of a professional detox program to stop using Xanax. In fact, Xanax withdrawal can be extremely risky, as it can lead to serious complications like seizures, according to experts.

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Treatment for Xanax Abuse

If you have been struggling with Xanax abuse, it is important that you seek help from a professional if you want to stop using the drug. As previously stated, Xanax withdrawal can be serious, so it is important to have the help of a professional while you are detoxing from this drug.

Staff in a Xanax rehab can provide you with a detox program, where you will receive medical care, support, and supervision to keep you as safe and as comfortable as possible as your body rids itself of Xanax. After you complete detox, it is important that you receive ongoing behavioral care to help you address the underlying issues that led to Xanax abuse.

Xanax Abuse is On the Rise Pathfinders - A group of people who are in Xanax rehab discuss their triggers that led to Xanax abuse.Takeaways on Telling Your Family You Need Help for Drugs

Telling your family, you need help for drugs and need to go to drug rehab can be challenging. Given the stigma and shame surrounding having a drug addict in the family, your loved ones may have a negative opinion of addiction treatment.

Some of the stigma surrounding drug abuse can be corrected by developing an understanding of addiction, such as learning that addiction is a legitimate medical condition that causes lasting changes in the brain.

Explaining that addiction is a lasting brain condition, informing your family of the benefits of treatment, and asking for their support as you go to drug rehab can make a difference. Letting them know the reasons you need help for drugs and telling them what to expect will increase the chances that your family will support you.

Xanax Abuse and Mental Illness

As the research indicates, Xanax treats anxiety and panic disorder, so many people who use this medication have a mental health condition. Furthermore, a significant portion of people engages in Xanax abuse to help them cope with tension or uncomfortable emotions.

It is not unusual for someone to have both a Xanax addiction and a co-occurring mental illness, such as anxiety, panic disorder, or depression. If you are struggling with Xanax abuse and mental illness, it is important that you seek treatment at a dual diagnosis rehab center.

A Xanax rehab specializing in dual diagnosis can provide treatment for both addiction and mental illness so that all of your needs are met. If you treat only the Xanax abuse but not the underlying mental health condition, you may return to Xanax abuse in order to self-medicate issues like stress or anxiety.

Xanax Rehab in Colorado and Arizona

Suppose you are living with Xanax addiction and are seeking a rehab center. In that case, Pathfinders Recovery Center has locations in both Colorado and Arizona, and we are happy to provide services to those in surrounding states as well.

We can offer both Colorado and Arizona Xanax rehab, and we are qualified to treat a dual diagnosis, to address Xanax abuse and mental illness together. We promise to provide research-backed treatment in our upscale facilities, and we employ a leadership team with upwards of 25 years of experience.

We are also accredited by the Joint Commission, and we offer a range of rehab services, including inpatient, outpatient, detox, and partial hospitalization.

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Paying for Colorado and Arizona Xanax Rehab

You may be worried about covering the costs of rehab.

If this is the case, the Pathfinders Recovery Center can ease some of your concerns with our free insurance verification program.

Visit our website and fill out a quick form, and one of our team members will be in touch with you as soon as possible to inform you of how much you can expect to pay out of pocket for Xanax rehab.

Even if you are without insurance, our team will work with you to develop a cash payment plan to make rehab affordable for you.

Regardless of your financial situation, we are here to help.

Reach out to us today to begin your journey toward a life that is free from the grips of Xanax abuse.

How to Tell Your Family You Need Help for Drugs

Admitting You Need Help for Drugs Can Be Challenging

If you have been struggling with drug abuse, admitting you need help can be difficult, especially when approaching people you love, including your family.

The shame and stigma surrounding drug abuse and addiction can make you fearful of reaching out or admitting to your family that you have become a “drug addict.”

While it is normal to be anxious about telling others you need help for drugs, it is important to have open conversations with family, so they can be a source of support as you seek rehab.

Hopefully, through an honest, heartfelt conversation, your family will understand that treatment can help you recover from drug abuse and lead a happier, healthier life.

How to ask for help with drugs Pathfinders - Photo of a mans hands as he holds a lighter under a spoon with white powder in it as he sucks the smoke through a straw.Doing Your Research Allows You to Explain Why You Need Help for Drugs

The first step in explaining to your family that you need help with drugs is researching what addiction means.

This can help you have an educated discussion with your family, so they know you are serious about seeking treatment.

For example, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, addiction is a mental illness and a chronic brain disease.

Over time, drug use causes lasting changes in the brain, leading people to seek drugs compulsively .

Therefore, it can be extremely difficult to stop using on your own.

When you approach your family to tell them you need help with drugs, it is helps to explain that addiction is a disease.

Just like any other medical condition, treatment is required to recover or get better.

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Explain the Science of Why You Need Help for Drugs

If you have been living with addiction, there is a chance that your family is upset with you. Perhaps you have lashed out at them in anger during the worst phases of your addiction, or perhaps you have stolen money from them to support your habit. Whatever the case, your family may see you as a “hopeless drug addict.”

There is a chance that your family is fed up with your drug abuse and are convinced that drug rehab will not work. If you suspect your family might feel this way, explain to them that your behavior results from a chronic brain condition. For example, as the National Institute on Drug Abuse explains, while the initial choice to use drugs is voluntary, over time, drug abuse damages areas of the brain responsible for judgment and decision-making.

This means that addiction can make it difficult for you to control your behavior or make reasonable decisions. During the conversation with your family, it is beneficial to explain this fact.  Apologize for the decisions you made while addicted, and make it clear that you need help with drugs to make better choices in the future.

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Other Talking Points When You Need Help for Drugs

Beyond explaining to your family that addiction is a legitimate medical condition that requires treatment because of its negative effects on the brain, it is helpful to educate your family about the prevalence of addiction and the effectiveness of addiction rehab.

A 2017 report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration shows that about 20.2 million adults have an addiction in any given year. Pointing this fact out can help your family understand that addiction is a common condition and that seeking drug rehab is a relatively acceptable thing. It may also be helpful to explain that treatment works and can help you to change your life.

Explain the Dangers of Not Seeking Treatment When You Need Help for Drugs

If your family is still hesitant about drug rehab, they may become more open to the idea when you explain the dangers of not seeking treatment. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the drug overdose death rate has tripled since 1999.

Avoiding going to treatment when you need help for drugs can increase your risk of death from an overdose. Not seeking treatment also puts you at risk of a multitude of health problems, including heart disease, cancer, stroke, and mental health problems.

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Explaining What Treatment Will Involve

Beyond understanding the science and consequences of drug abuse, it will be important for your family to know what to expect from drug rehab. They can understand whether you are going to inpatient rehab or attending drug rehab on an outpatient basis.
Additionally, your family should understand that they are an important part of your recovery journey. They may be upset about your addiction or unsure that you need help for drugs, but asking them to support you in your recovery is an important step.

How to ask for help with drugs Pathfinders - A young man stands up with his family around him and tells them about his drug addiction and asks for help getting into drug rehab.Takeaways on Telling Your Family You Need Help for Drugs

Telling your family, you need help for drugs and need to go to drug rehab can be challenging. Given the stigma and shame surrounding having a drug addict in the family, your loved ones may have a negative opinion of addiction treatment.
Some of the stigma surrounding drug abuse can be corrected by developing an understanding of addiction, such as learning that addiction is a legitimate medical condition that causes lasting changes in the brain.

Explaining that addiction is a lasting brain condition, informing your family of the benefits of treatment, and asking for their support as you go to drug rehab can make a difference. Letting them know the reasons you need help for drugs and telling them what to expect will increase the chances that your family will support you.

Drug Abuse Treatment in Colorado and Arizona

If you are ready to seek treatment for drug abuse, Pathfinders Recovery Center has locations in both Colorado and Arizona. We are a luxury treatment center, and we offer a range of services, including residential treatment, outpatient rehab, detox, and partial hospitalization.

Pathfinders Recovery Center employs a leadership team with over 25 years of experience in the field, and we use evidence-based approaches for drug rehab. We are also considered a dual diagnosis center, meaning we are qualified to treat both addiction and mental illness.

Free Insurance Verification for Drug Rehab – Get Help Now

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Paying for Drug Rehab

After telling your family you need help with drugs, your next concern may be determining how to pay for drug rehab.

At Pathfinders Recovery Center, we make the process easier by offering a free insurance verification program.

Simply fill out a form on our website, and a member of our team will be in touch with you to inform you what you can expect to pay out-of-pocket for rehab.

If you do not have insurance, our team will also work with you to create a cash payment plan.

Reach out to us today to learn how we can help you recover from drug abuse.