Long-Term Effects of Heroin

LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF HEROIN

Heroin Use Disorder Definition

Opioid or heroin use disorder is a chronic, lifelong disorder. Heroin use disorder has serious potential consequences, including a history of relapse, disability, and even death. In 2020, over 92,000 Americans died due to drug overdoses.

This was almost a 30% increase from the previous year. While heroin overdose rates have decreased slightly in the years since there was a seven-fold increase in deaths involving heroin from 2002 to 2017. Heroin use disorders remain a significant public health crisis.

What is Long-Term Heroin Use?

Since there are currently no approved medical uses for heroin, any amount or method of use constitutes abuse. But what is the timeframe that we consider short-term heroin abuse, as opposed to long-term heroin abuse, which is more likely to lead to heroin use disorders?

For prescription medications, many experts define short-term use as covering roughly one month. Long-term use may then be anything over one month and averages approximately three months or more.

But again, the rules change when we are talking about an illicit drug rather than a prescription medication. Heroin is one of the most addictive drugs available today. And it has become increasingly common for dealers to lace heroin with fentanyl, making it even more dangerous.

Effects of Long-Term Opiate Intake

Long-term opiate ingestion can cause a wide range of side effects. These side effects may be physical, mental, or emotional, with most users experiencing some combination of all three. Individual factors can alter your experience with heroin, including:

  • The frequency of heroin abuse.
  • The method of heroin abuse.
  • Other substances that are present in the body.
  • Your overall physical and mental health.

For most, changes in thought patterns, drug cravings, relapses, and withdrawal symptoms are some of the most noticeable early side effects.

Physical Effects of Chronic Heroin Use

Long-Term Effects of Heroin

Many of the effects of heroin use disorder are more psychological than physical. However, there are still many potential physical side effects of chronic heroin use that users should be aware of. Some of the most common include:

  • Constipation
  • Depressed respiration
  • Pneumonia and other lung complications
  • Damaged nasal tissue for those who repeatedly snort heroin
  • Collapsed or scarred veins and bacterial infections for those who inject heroin

As we mentioned earlier in the article, your side effects may vary depending on the severity of your addiction and the state of your overall health, among other factors.

Psychological Changes Made by Heroin

Repeated heroin use changes the physical structure and physiology of the brain. These changes create long-term imbalances in our hormonal and neuronal systems, and these imbalances are not easy to reverse.

In long-term heroin use, one of the largest psychological concerns is white matter damage in the brain. White matter damage can impair our decision-making skills, behavior regulation abilities, and stress responses.

A lack of control over these emotional processes can leave us feeling trapped and helpless. We can help you end the cycle of abuse and regain control.

Heroin Withdrawal Symptoms

Certain opiates, including heroin, produce extreme degrees of tolerance and physical dependence. When our bodies adapt to the presence of a drug, we become physically dependent on it, and withdrawal symptoms occur if we abruptly reduce or stop using it.

Heroin withdrawal symptoms may start in as short as a few hours after the last dose. Some of the most common heroin withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Insomnia and restlessness.
  • Bone and muscle pain.
  • Vomiting and diarrhea.
  • Involuntary leg movements.
  • Cold flashes and goosebumps.

Through any method, heroin is extremely addictive. And heroin use disorder leads users to prioritize the drug over all else in their life, despite any negative consequences this may cause.

Risks of Fentanyl and Heroin Overdose

With the rate of fatal heroin overdoses landing in the thousands, this opioid remains a pressing concern. And there are several activities or additions that may make a heroin overdose more likely. For now, we will focus on the risks of fentanyl and heroin overdose.

One of the most pressing problems in the heroin crisis is that it is frequently laced with fentanyl without the user’s knowledge. Fentanyl is another addictive and dangerous opioid, which is approximately 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine.

We can’t always control what distributors put in the drugs that they sell on the streets. And we can’t always control how our bodies react to these substances.  But we can control what we put into our bodies, even when it feels like we have no control at all.

Establishing Recovery That Will Last

Establishing recovery that will last starts with being honest with yourself. Heroin use disorder will not go away on its own. And it will likely not get better without treatment. This is not something that you have to face alone. Our dedicated professionals are here to help.

Heroin can present several overwhelming, uncomfortable, and even dangerous withdrawal symptoms. These severe withdrawal symptoms make it harder to detox at home. So, we recommend starting with medical detox.

Our suboxone and other medication-assisted options will help reduce or eliminate your withdrawal symptoms to aid the early sobriety stage. With these symptoms made more manageable, you become free to focus on your recovery.

From there, we recommend inpatient care, whether that means a traditional residential program or a long-term rehab program.

Inpatient vs. Outpatient Care for Heroin Addiction

Long-Term Effects of Heroin

Long-term drug abuse and addiction may require long-term inpatient care. While many traditional residential programs last an average of 30 days to three months, long-term rehab programs typically last longer than that.

Some stay for six months, while others remain for a year or more. If you start your recovery journey with a long-term program, you will spend your time here working toward a variety of recovery goals, including:

  • Altering damaging thought patterns and behaviors
  • Re-establishing the social skills lost during addiction
  • Building sober social networks and learning from social support groups
  • Developing healthy habits and coping mechanisms
  • Controlling negative emotions, like stress, anger, and depression, rather than submitting to them or using drugs to quiet them

During your time in long-term rehab, your days are spent with dedicated professionals and others on the same journey. We will evaluate your progress and needs as they change to ensure that you are still in the appropriate program.

Other Program Options for Heroin Addiction

While there are many different paths toward recovery, most start with residential care before transitioning into a more flexible program. Once your condition is more stable and you feel confident in your ability to maintain your sobriety at home, an outpatient program comes next.

Depending on your needs and mental health, this might mean a partial hospitalization program or an intensive outpatient program. We will work with you to determine which will best suit your needs when the time comes.

Overcoming Heroin Use Disorder at a Pathfinders Recovery Center

With conveniently located luxury facilities in both Arizona and Colorado, personalized care programs, and a full staff of dedicated professionals, the Pathfinders approach can make all the difference.

From detox through aftercare, we offer comprehensive programs to meet all of your recovery needs through each stage. Call us today at 866-275-0079 to learn more. Our confidential call line is always open, and our addiction counselors are here to help.

Adderall Addiction Stories

Adderall Addiction Stories

What is Adderall?

Adderall is a common prescription central nervous system stimulant, a category that also includes Ritalin, Concerta, and Dexedrine. It works by increasing central nervous system activity through two of our brain chemicals: norepinephrine and dopamine.

These chemicals impact feelings of reward and important bodily functions, including heart rate. In proper application, taking Adderall can boost our energy levels, improve our focus, and decrease our feelings of restlessness.

But for every positive that comes with Adderall use, there is a corresponding negative. In both medical and illicit settings, many medical professionals consider Adderall a high-risk medication with the potential for abuse and addiction.

Prescribed Usage of Adderall

Two of the most common prescription uses of Adderall are attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. ADHD is one of the most common childhood psychiatric conditions. While it typically starts in adolescence, symptoms continue into adulthood for roughly half of all patients diagnosed before age 18.

Regulated and cautious use of Adderall can help ease many ADHD symptoms, including lack of focus, restlessness, and lack of energy. But while it does have approved medical uses, prescription stimulant abuse is on the rise.

And prescription stimulants, including Adderall, have been classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency as Schedule II drugs due to their high potential for abuse that may produce psychological and/or physiological dependence.

Methods of Adderall Abuse

Abuse may mean taking Adderall through an unapproved method, like crushing and snorting or injecting instead of swallowing, taking higher doses than you were prescribed, or taking someone else’s medication.

It may also mean taking Adderall to get high or to promote side effects your doctor hasn’t deemed necessary for you. Lying to your doctor about your symptoms or switching doctors to obtain a new prescription is a dangerous abuse method.

The Food and Drug Administration or FDA has not evaluated the effectiveness of Adderall for long-term use in controlled trials. They recommend periodic re-evaluation to ensure that the drug is still benefiting the patient more than it may be harming them.

Adderall Addiction Stories

Adderall Addiction Stories

Whether ours or someone else’s, we all have Adderall addiction stories. A few stories of Adderall addiction even have tragic endings. Others are more positive and give addicts in recovery hope. We’re here to remind you that your story is your own.

Drug addiction rarely gets better when it goes untreated. And though it has been labeled a study drug, misused Adderall more often gives the illusion of efficiency rather than actually making us more productive.

Since many Adderall addiction stories involve students and amphetamines or workplace Adderall abuse, we thought it would be helpful to next talk about the average age when drug abuse begins.

Age at Which Abuse Begins

Recent studies have revealed that the peak ages for beginning misuse of prescription stimulants are between ages 16 and 19. While this is when misuse begins, that does not necessarily mean that it never starts at other ages or doesn’t continue into other age groups.

As we mentioned before, about half of patients diagnosed with DHD under 18 will also experience symptoms into adulthood. Many adults continue to misuse Adderall, whether to combat symptoms or boost productivity at home or work.

Signs of Adderall Dependency

In this section, we want to focus on the behavioral and emotional signs of Adderall dependency before moving on to the physical signs. If you are concerned for yourself or a loved one, there are several signs of Adderall dependency to keep in mind. Here are a few examples:

  • Becoming angry or defensive when asked about your Adderall use.
  • Lying to friends or loved ones about your drug habits.
  • Neglecting responsibilities and hobbies to spend more time under the influence of Adderall.
  • Needing higher or more frequent doses to achieve the side effects that you want.

Side Effects of Adderall Addiction

One of the most troubling side effects of Adderall addiction is the presence of stimulant withdrawal symptoms when you try to stop taking it. In addition to presenting mental and physical health risks, withdrawal symptoms are some of the most common relapse triggers.

Some of the most common Adderall withdrawal symptoms include depression, fatigue, and sleep problems. These and other Adderall withdrawal symptoms have led many users to start taking them again to feel better.

But over time, these side effects only get worse. And continued long-term use comes with additional risks, including a higher risk of overdose. A stimulant overdose can cause severe or even fatal side effects, including heart attacks and seizures.

The Connection Between Amphetamines and Mania and Psychosis

Misuse of stimulants is associated with dangers like psychosis, heart attack, heart disease, and even sudden death. Adderall abuse can have long-term or even permanent mental and physical health consequences.

And it turns out that there may also be a direct link between Adderall and more dangerous substances.

ADHD Meds and the Meth Connection

Adderall Addiction Stories

While further research may be needed to better understand the connection, evidence shows a high prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults who use meth. What this tells us is that untreated ADHD symptoms often lead to drug abuse of different kinds.

If you are battling Adderall or methamphetamine addiction, our recovery programs can help. We also offer dual diagnosis programs for those who are battling co-occurring mental health disorders. And this is not limited to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Depression, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, and schizophrenia are some of the most common co-occurring mental health disorders. Treating addiction and mental health disorders together is crucial to recovery.

Treating one and not the other will ensure that neither truly gets better.

Treatment for Adderall Dependency Issues

Depending on the level of your addiction, withdrawal symptoms, and other needs, we offer several different treatment options for Adderall dependency issues. For example, someone with a co-occurring mental health disorder might choose a partial hospitalization program or PHP.

The in-depth care offered during a PHP can provide effective help for both substance-related and mental health symptoms. Similarly, someone with a particularly severe addiction, troubling withdrawal symptoms, or a history of relapse might choose an inpatient or residential program.

In the comfort and safety of our facility, inpatient programs offer 24-hour access to high-level care, support, and guidance. Lastly, someone with a milder addiction, limited withdrawal symptoms, and no mental health concerns might choose an intensive outpatient program.

An intensive outpatient program allows you to continue working, spending time with family, and attending to other responsibilities at home while visiting our facility for treatments each week. Generally, these require nine to 19 hours of your time each week.

Attaining long-term recovery from Adderall addictions starts with choosing the right program. We will help you evaluate your addiction and needs, choose the right program, and customize it to suit you. There are no one-size-fits-all solutions at a Pathfinders Recovery Center.

Paving Your Way at a Pathfinders Recovery Center

The road to recovery looks different for everyone. We are here to help you find your way. Call our confidential line today at 866-576-4892 to start building your customized care plan. Our addiction counselors are always on call to answer questions and guide you through the next steps.

Staying Sober Through the Holidays

Staying sober through the holidays

Staying Sober Through the Holidays

While many things seem to have an extra touch of magic around the holidays, those in recovery may also find that this is a time when temptations and triggers multiply. If you’ve been working hard to protect your sobriety and reach your recovery goals, this time can be challenging.

Staying sober through the holidays comes down to understanding and protecting yourself through a season when alcohol and emotions flow more readily than they normally do. We’re here to help you recognize the challenge and find ways to overcome it.

Most Common Seasonal Relapse Triggers

Celebrating holidays without drinking and drugs can be hard when you feel like everyone around you is experiencing the season without a care. But what others are doing is not what matters. What matters is that you continue to take care of your body, mind, and soul.

Taking pride in your recovery and accomplishments rather than comparing yourself to others can help you overcome one of the biggest seasonal relapse triggers: exposure. Staying sober through the holidays may mean making some sacrifices.

You can limit your exposure to drugs and alcohol by strategically choosing who you spend your time with and where. If you choose to attend events where it will be easy for you to slip up, we have some suggestions for that, too.

Concrete Planning and Tips for Sober Celebrations

Staying Sober Through the Holidays

There are many strategies for staying sober through holiday stress and other temptations and triggers. The trick is finding the one or ones that work best for you. Here are some suggestions:

  • Avoid known risks to your sobriety by attending activities within your sober social circle.
  • Bring a sober friend to a regular party (traveling with a sober companion will make it easier for you to say no, avoid temptation, arrive early, and leave early.)
  • Know your limits when it comes to situations, locations, or people who trigger you.
  • Keep in regular contact with your sponsor throughout the season.
  • Practice self-care through yoga, meditation, exercise, or massage to treat yourself before and after social gatherings.
  • Attend 12-step or other support group meetings throughout the season (if you’re traveling out of the city or state you live in, you can still attend phone meetings or virtual sessions.)

Another tip that many in recovery have found helpful around the holidays is to carry a drink around every party you attend. When you arrive, fill a cup with water, soda, or another non-alcoholic drink and keep it in your hand for the duration of the event.

This way, you won’t have to refuse drinks all night, and you likely won’t have to explain to anyone why you’re not drinking unless you choose to. Attending holiday events with sober supports is another great way to stay on track.

Staying Sober Through the Holidays by Starting New Traditions

Staying sober through the holidays is easier when you take time to celebrate your most meaningful connections and relationships. One easy and exciting way to do this is by starting new traditions that do not center around drinking or drug use.

If you’ve been in recovery for a while, you may have already started building relationships with sober peers you can spend time with this holiday season. And if you have pre-existing friend groups that you’d like to spend time with, there is nothing wrong with asking them ahead of time to respect your sobriety and leave the substances at home.

Whether you’re planning a gathering with a support group or old friends, this holiday season is a great time to host a festive sober gathering. There are plenty of ways to have fun without being under the influence.

Ideas for New Traditions and Solo Activities

Staying Sober Through the Holidays

Whether you’re eager to be around friends or find positive ways to spend time alone, there are endless options for sober activities. Here are a few activity suggestions:

  • Host a board game night.
  • Invite friends for a craft or paint night.
  • Write in a journal or have a creative writing contest.
  • Take a long walk, go to the gym, or attend a fitness class.
  • Try yoga or meditation.
  • Craft a hand-written letter to a friend.
  • Adopt a pet.

Creative activities reduce stress and depression, two negative emotions that are frequently linked to relapse. Additionally, research shows that people who exercise regularly are less likely to use illicit drugs.

And having pets has been shown to boost our overall moods, reduce feelings of loneliness, and give us a sense of purpose. But your options are not limited to the activities on this list. Try these or find other ways to improve your mental and physical health.

Creativity, togetherness, a balanced diet, and regular exercise can help us through many obstacles during recovery. And managing negative emotions or finding ways to replace them with positive ones can make it easier to maintain your sobriety even when challenges arise.

Acronyms to Remember: Halt and Others

H.A.L.T is an Alcoholics Anonymous acronym for some of the most common relapse triggers. These are not holiday-specific, but that does not mean that they will take the season off. These are additional, year-round triggers you should watch out for:

  • Hungry.
  • Angry.
  • Lonely.
  • Tired.

To combat these emotional relapse triggers, practice anger management techniques and spend time with supportive friends and loved ones. Also, try to get the recommended eight hours of sleep each night and eat a balanced diet.

It may sound like an overly simplified solution, but how much we sleep and what we eat can impact everything from our moods to our immune systems. And while we are talking about the importance of making good choices for ourselves, we want to talk about saying no.

If you are feeling emotionally vulnerable, it is perfectly reasonable to decline attending events or spending time with certain individuals. Protecting yourself and your sobriety is your priority, not saying yes just to please someone else.

This leads us to another important AA acronym, which is C.H.A.N.G.E. In recovery, change stands for “choosing honesty allows new growth every day.” Being honest with and true to yourself is an important part of recovery.

Seeking Inpatient Care During the Holidays

If you have recently relapsed or are worried that you will, another option that you may want to consider is an inpatient rehab program. Our inpatient program offers 24-hour access to the care, support, and guidance of our professional team in a safe and comfortable facility.

In a setting like this, temptations and triggers feel farther away because they are. A change of scenery can work wonders for those who are struggling to maintain their sobriety and lack adequate social support at home.

During an inpatient stay, your days will include healthy meals, creative activities, counseling sessions, support group meetings, and more. We all have to start somewhere. Call us today at 866-263-1820 to see if inpatient care is right for you.

We also offer several other programs for those who prefer to continue living at home and attend weekly sessions and meetings for support. Staying sober through the holidays can be challenging. But it is not a challenge you have to face alone.

What Happens When You Mix Adderall and Weed

What Happens When You Mix Adderall and Weed

You may know Adderall as a medication that’s used to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). While it is used by adults, Adderall is most frequently used to treat ADHD in children. Children usually present the first symptoms of ADHD around the age of seven. What Happens When You Mix Adderall and Weed?

Sometimes the disorder goes away but up to 60 percent of children continue to experience symptoms in adulthood. Therefore, some adults have prescriptions for this drug.

Adderall is also used to help people with narcolepsy to stay awake. However, like many other prescription drugs, it’s also used recreationally by people who don’t have prescriptions.

Often, it’s combined with weed in an attempt to negate some of the negative side effects. Even people who have prescriptions may mix Adderall and weed.

In this article, we’ll look at the effects of mixing these two drugs. If you or someone you love is engaging in this practice, you need to talk to a medical professional.

The Effects of Adderall and Cannabis

The Effects of Adderall and Cannabis

Before we get into what happens when these two substances are combined, we first need to understand the side effects of each drug when taken separately. This sets the stage for understanding how they may interact.

Adderall is a central nervous system stimulant that’s made up of four amphetamine salts:

  • Dextroamphetamine saccharate
  • Amphetamine aspartate
  • Dextroamphetamine sulfate
  • Amphetamine sulfate

Adderall increases the levels of dopamine and norepinephrine in the brain. It helps to improve attention, focus, listening skills, and organizational skills while also controlling behavioral challenges.

While this drug is intended to make people with ADHD more focused, some people who don’t have this condition use it for pleasure or to improve their performance. Many of these individuals are college or high school students who want to stay awake for long periods while they cram for exams or work on large projects.

However, professionals who want to improve their job performance and athletes who want to do better on the field may also use it.

Like other stimulants, Adderall can cause cardiovascular and psychological distress. Some of the side effects include:

  • Anxiety
  • Insomnia
  • Depression when coming down
  • Loss of sex drive
  • Headaches
  • Dry mouth
  • Weight loss
  • Diarrhea

Cannabis

Weed or cannabis is a psychoactive drug that is often smoked or consumed in an edible form. Many people see it as a harmless and even highly therapeutic drug.

However, the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content today is a lot higher than it was in the 1970s and this makes it more dangerous than some people realize. THC is the main psychoactive component in cannabis and it creates the high for which cannabis is typically known.

Some individuals who have ADHD use marijuana as a way of self-medicating. There are people who advocate for the use of weed as an ADHD treatment.

They say that it helps individuals to manage severe symptoms like irritability, agitation, and lack of restraint while causing fewer side effects than the usual prescription medicines.

While many people find cannabis beneficial, it can have serious side effects for some individuals. These side effects vary depending on how strong the weed is and how high the individual’s tolerance is.

 

Effects can include:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Paranoia
  • Hallucinations 
  • Brain fog
  • Increased appetite
  • Blood pressure spikes
  • Increased heart rate
  • Laziness and inactivity

Chronic use of marijuana can also lead to long-term issues such as:

  • Problems breathing
  • Increased heart rate
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • A decline in IQ if started as a teenager
  • A decline in verbal ability and general knowledge
  • Decreased life satisfaction
  • Problems with fetal development in pregnant women

People often believe that weed can’t be addictive. However, between 9 and 30 percent of people who use marijuana will go on to develop a substance use disorder. Individuals who start using when they’re under the age of 18 are more likely to become addicted

Marijuana can also be harmful for people with mental health conditions. For example, individuals who have schizophrenia are more likely to develop psychosis. Smoking marijuana can also make respiratory conditions worse.

What People Who Combine Adderall and Weed Experience

While Adderall and cannabis have benefits when used separately, mixing them is a cause for concern. It can be difficult to answer the question “what does mixing Adderall with weed feel like?” since marijuana can have such varying effects.

We know that Adderall is a stimulant but marijuana can be a stimulant, depressant, or hallucinogen depending on the strain used. Therefore, weed can either enhance the effects of Adderall or balance them out.

Some people who have ADHD say weed reduces the agitation and distress that Adderall often causes.

Meanwhile, some people who use marijuana say Adderall helps to relieve side effects such as fatigue and reduced cognitive function. This may seem like the ideal combination for people who use either drug for therapeutic purposes. However, not everyone will have the same experience.

Dangers of Adderall Abuse

Dangers of Adderall Abuse

The long-term abuse of Adderall can lead to irregular heart rhythms, increased blood pressure, and even addiction. People are most likely to become addicted to Adderall when they take more than the prescribed dose, take doses more frequently than prescribed or use the drug for longer than prescribed

Adderall can become more addictive when taken with other substances and people who struggle with substance abuse disorders are among those at the highest risk.

Students, people with stressful jobs, athletes, and individuals who struggle with bulimia or anorexia are also more likely to become addicted to Adderall. Even after individuals quit using Adderall, they may continue to face irreversible health issues.

Dangers of Combining Both Drugs

Depression is one of the possible outcomes when people use both Adderall and weed. Long-term Adderall use can make it difficult for the brain to release dopamine and serotonin on its own. The brain comes to rely on Adderall to produce these chemicals.

As a result, the user may experience depression and anhedonia, which is an inability to feel pleasure without using drugs. Heavy marijuana use can also cause the brain to release less dopamine so combining Adderall and weed over a long period can lead to depression.

Another danger of combining Adderall and weed is that the risk of abuse increases. Some people experience an even more desirable high when they take both drugs. This euphoria can drive them to use these substances again. This can lead to addiction.

People who abuse Adderall and weed regularly may need to undergo a medical detox process to get the drugs out of their bodies. Taking combinations of drugs that haven’t been prescribed is often dangerous. If you’re mixing substances and you’re finding it hard to stop, seek professional help.

How Long Do Weed and Adderall Stay in the Body?

Adderall has a half-life of about ten hours. This means it takes about ten hours  for half the dosage to leave the body. Generally, it’ll take around two days for the drug to leave your system.

Meanwhile, the effects of marijuana peak around ten minutes after use and last for one to three hours in most cases.

However, the effects can last for up to eight or ten hours. A lot depends on:

  • The individual’s tolerance
  • The individual’s body weight and metabolism
  • How much weed they took
  • How much THC the weed contained
  • Whether they ate beforehand 

Can You Overdose on Adderall?

The simple answer is yes. While people often associate overdoses with opioids and other depressants, stimulant overdoses can and do occur. They are different in that they result from an overstimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system.

Therefore, symptoms of an Adderall overdose include:

  • Heart attack
  • Aggression
  • Panic
  • Hallucinations
  • Tremors
  • Fever 

It takes a lot of Adderall to cause a fatal overdose. A lethal dose is somewhere between 20 and 25 milligrams per kilogram of body weight and it’s not likely that a person would take that much.

However, using weed can mitigate some of the side effects of Adderall. This may lead the person to use even more Adderall, thereby increasing the risk of a dangerous overdose. If you think you or someone else is experiencing an

Adderall overdose, call the emergency services and let them assess the situation. 

How to Tell If You’re Addicted to Adderall or Weed

Addiction is complicated and people who struggle with their drug use often aren’t sure about if they’re addicted or not. Given that it’s relatively easy to legally source both weed and Adderall, the lines may be even more blurred.

However, it’s important to note that any substance can be abused and even if you have a prescription for Adderall, you may be misusing the drug. If you’re worried about your drug use or your loved ones have raised concerns, you should talk to an addictions professional. 

Signs of drug addiction include:

  • Difficulty stopping or reducing your drug use
  • Needing more and more of a drug to get the effects you once did
  • Experiencing strong cravings for the substance
  • Thinking about ways to acquire more of the drug
  • Prioritizing the substance over hobbies and other things you enjoyed
  • Developing increased tolerance
  • Experiencing withdrawal symptoms when you stop taking the drug
  • Repeatedly using the substance in dangerous situations
  • Continuing to use the substance even though it is negatively affecting your health
  • Continuing to use the substance even though it is negatively affecting people you love
  • Neglecting your responsibilities in favor of drug use

How Treatment Can Help

How Treatment Can Help

Misusing Adderall and weed is considered polydrug abuse. If you’re abusing two or more substances, treatment will need to address all of them along with any co-occurring disorders like anxiety or depression.

Any kind of substance abuse can have life-altering effects and your health can suffer in both the long and the short term. While mixing Adderall and weed may not be as dangerous and combining Adderall and alcohol, it is still unsafe.

The sooner you seek help, the better it will be for you. You may be able to reverse some of the damage caused by your drug use and prevent additional problems from occurring in the future.

By enrolling in a recovery program, you can detox from the substances in your body and learn how you can achieve long-term sobriety. It is highly recommended that you undergo medical detox.

You’ll have 24/7 medical supervision and you’ll be provided with medications to help you manage nausea, vomiting, and depression that may accompany withdrawal.

Making it through the detoxification process is the start of recovery. Getting the drugs out of your body is essential but you also need to take care of your mental and emotional needs.

It’s important that you identify what caused you to abuse drugs in the first place and then learn how to handle those triggers.

Treatments vary from one facility to another but people struggling with substance abuse problems typically benefit from one or more of the following interventions:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • Dialectical behavior therapy
  • Group therapy
  • Individual therapy
  • Family therapy
  • Motivational interviewing
  • Stress management
  • Relapse prevention planning

Get Addiction Treatment from Pathfinders Recovery Center

Now that you’re aware of the dangers of mixing Adderall and weed, you may think that you have a drug problem. Given the long and short-term dangers of substance abuse, you need to make it a priority to find a reputable rehab facility. At Pathfinders Recovery Center, we provide individuals with the tools they need to live a life free of addiction. We don’t only focus on detox. We offer a variety of customized evidence-based treatments that cater to the mind, body, and spirit. If you’re ready to start your recovery journey, call us to discuss the available treatment options. We offer fast insurance verification.

 

Addiction Recovery Success Stories from Celebrities

Addiction Recovery Success Stories from Celebrities

Often, we hear about people who are struggling with drug or alcohol addiction. These may be people in our families or neighborhoods, social media influencers, or TV celebrities. It’s not often that we hear about those who are successfully working through their recovery or those who are celebrating decades of sobriety.

Instead, it’s more likely to hear that someone suffered a fatal overdose. 

Dramatic stories grab headlines and attract lots of attention. However, the lack of addiction recovery success stories can make it seem like no one ever recovers from drug or alcohol addiction.

As addiction treatment professionals, we see several success stories. We also take note of celebrity accounts of addiction. They show that anyone can develop an addiction and anyone can recover if they get the right help.

Let’s take a look at some of the celebrities who have been open about both their addiction and their recovery.

Drew Barrymore

Drew Barrymore’s acting career started at the tender age of six and she started drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes by the age of nine. She quickly moved onto cocaine and marijuana and by the age of 13, she entered rehab.

She spent the next year in and out of addiction treatment centers and psychiatric facilities. At age 15, she emancipated herself and started working in a coffee shop.

Eventually, she started attending auditions again. From all accounts, Barrymore was able to remain sober throughout adulthood and became a successful actress and producer.

Martin Sheen

Martin Sheen has been in recovery from alcoholism since 1981. His alcoholism was so severe during the 1970s that he suffered a heart attack while filming Apocalypse Now. it is said that the opening scene in that film is very much real.

Sheen was so intoxicated that he punched the mirror and cut his hand. He refused to accept treatment or stop filming.

However, he later said he found sobriety through Catholicism and his faith and then became involved in Alcoholics Anonymous to help his son Charlie Sheen

Robert Downey, Jr

Robert Downey, Jr

Robert Downey, Jr’s addiction story has been told several times over. He appeared in his first film at the age of five and he said his father allowed him to smoke cannabis when he was just six years old. He recalled growing up surrounded by drugs and said his father would often do drugs with him as a way to bond with him

Downey eventually became addicted to heroin and he was arrested multiple times. He was also jailed for six months after failing to take a court-ordered drug test.

Downey managed to get clean in 2001. He credited holistic therapies, yoga, kung fu, and spousal support for his ability to achieve sobriety. Downey also recommends 12-step recovery programs.

Jamie Lee Curtis

Jamie Lee Curtis has a family history of addiction. Her father struggled with alcohol, cocaine, and heroin while her half-brother died from a heroin overdose at age 23.

Curtis has one of those drug addiction recovery success stories that need to be told having celebrated 22 years of sobriety in February 2021. Her history of addiction started in 1989 when she was prescribed Vicodin after minor plastic surgery.

For ten years, she used opiates and alcohol unbeknownst to many people. Curtis said she was careful not to use any substances while she worked or take Vicodin early in the day. After getting caught taking Vicodin pills with wine and admitting to stealing Vicodin from her sister, she sought help.

Curtis attended a recovery meeting in 1999 and confided in her husband. Since then, she has attended recovery meetings around the world and she asks hotels to remove minibars from her room to help her maintain her sobriety.

Elton John

Elton John

Elton John has been sober since 1990. He started experimenting with cocaine in 1974 as a way to gain social acceptance. John described himself as a loner who wasn’t good looking and he used drugs to make him feel like part of the “gang”. He recalled that his first line of cocaine made him sick but he still went back for more.

John took drugs from the mid-1970s and also drank alcohol. During what he calls the lost years, he attempted suicide many times, overdosed on cocaine on multiple occasions, and suffered epileptic seizures. 

The turning point came when he asked for help in 1990 after witnessing the death of teenager Ryan White. White contracted HIV through a blood transfusion and John became close to him and his family.

The two worked together on HIV/AIDS awareness campaigns and fundraisers and John was at White’s bedside when died of AIDS on April 8, 1990. John said White’s death changed him.

Daniel Radcliffe

Few people would believe that Daniel Radcliffe struggled with alcohol abuse as he came to the end of filming the Harry Potter films. However, Radcliffe said he drank heavily during the production of the last three films before he realized he was not in control of his alcohol use. He quit drinking after completing the last film.

Radcliffe says he doesn’t consider himself an alcoholic but he has an addictive personality and he drank nightly

Radcliffe said he struggled to come to terms with his fame as an 18-year-old and he adopted a party lifestyle. However, almost every time he drank, he would black out, so he stopped going out.

Instead, he drank at home alone, fearing the tabloids would capture him doing something inappropriate if he went out. Radcliffe quit drinking in 2010 but in 2012, he got into a fight with a DJ while intoxicated. After this relapse, he was able to regain his sobriety.

Radcliffe doesn’t attend AA meetings but he said he goes for long walks when he gets the urge to drink and goes to the gym regularly.

Sir Anthony Hopkin

Sir Anthony Hopkins is an award-winning actor, producer, and director who has starred in more than 80 films in a career that spans 60 years. He’s known for his roles in Silence of the Lambs and Hitchcock.

What many people didn’t know until recently is that he struggled with alcoholism in the 1960s and 70s. Sir Anthony said he was plagued by feelings of inadequacy and self-doubt after he tried to build a theatre career. He abruptly walked out of the filming of Macbeth in 1973 and abandoned his first wife and daughter, all because of his alcoholism

In 1975, his second wife left him and he went on a bender that went on for multiple days. He ended up in a Pheonix, Arizona hotel room with no memory of how he got there. He subsequently experienced several blackouts as a result of his drinking and this is what prompted him to get help.

His agent suggested that he attend an AA meeting and that’s when he started his sobriety journey. Sir Anthony said his fear of losing his health, family, and career made him stay in recovery.

Treatment: The Foundation of Your Success Story

Treatment The Foundation of Your Success Story

Addiction recovery success stories aren’t reserved for celebrities. In recovery, you’ll meet regular people who have meth recovery success stories, benzo recovery success stories, and other drug addiction recovery success stories.

What’s clear about the celebrities we’ve discussed is that addiction is different for each individual. Some people started using drugs or alcohol in childhood while others developed an addiction later in life.

Each person had a different motivation for seeking treatment and they all tried different routes to sobriety.

That’s because there’s no one-size-fits-all solution where addiction is concerned. If you or a loved one is struggling to control your drug use, you need to find an addiction treatment center that’s right for you.

After you undergo detox, you will need personalized counseling and therapy to help you identify and manage your triggers and stay sober in the long term.

Many people follow a continuum of care that includes inpatient treatment, partial hospitalization, outpatient treatment, 12-step support, and continued therapy. 

This is because addiction is a chronic disease and a few days of detox isn’t enough to ensure long-term sobriety. Drug and alcohol treatment may include:

  • Medication
  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • Motivational interviewing
  • Dialectical behavior therapy
  • Treatment of co-occurring mental health disorders including anxiety and depression
  • Skills training
  • Family or community-based support
  • Peer support

Contact Pathfinders Recovery Center Today!

If you’re ready to take control of your life again and say goodbye to addictive substances, the professionals at Pathfinders Recovery Center are here to help.

We have luxury rehab centers in Arizona and Colorado and we offer highly personalized treatment for each person who comes through our doors.

We accept most forms of private insurance and we’ll gladly verify your coverage. Contact us today to learn more about the drug and alcohol treatment options we offer.

What is Medication Assisted Treatment?

What is Medication Assisted Treatment

Traditional addiction treatment options typically do not involve the use of medication.

Instead, the traditional recovery route usually includes a monitored drug or alcohol detox and rehab.

These are the traditional methods for a reason. They’ve been proven effective over many years. 

But sometimes, we need something more. A moderate to severe addiction, overwhelming withdrawal symptoms, or a history of relapse could require an even more dedicated approach.

Medication-assisted treatment or MAT may be recommended in these cases. 

What is the Purpose of Medication-Assisted Treatment?

What is the Purpose of Medication-Assisted Treatment

Recovering from a mild addiction and withdrawal symptoms may mean suffering through a week or so of flu-like symptoms, insomnia, and mood changes.

But for many individuals in recovery, withdrawing isn’t so simple. 

Many of the most common mental and physical withdrawal symptoms are severe enough to lead to relapse, cause short or long-term health concerns, or even become life-threatening.

Overwhelming withdrawal symptoms are one of the most common relapse triggers. 

The purpose of medication-assisted treatment is to make it easier to maintain your sobriety when your addiction becomes too severe to manage on your own. 

Types of Medication-Assisted Treatment

Medication-assisted treatment can be helpful during more than one stage of recovery.

A MAT program might mean a medically assisted detox or a medically assisted treatment program.

This can be a full-time, residential program or a part-time, outpatient program. 

Depending on the type and severity of your addiction, we may recommend detox and/or maintenance using medication-assisted treatment.

During detox, these medications may ease withdrawal symptoms, including cravings, making it easier to stay sober and feel more comfortable. 

After detox, MAT can be helpful in maintaining sobriety throughout your treatment program.

Medication-assisted treatment is considered the most effective intervention for treating opioid use disorders and others. 

How Does MAT Work?

MAT is often more effective than either medications alone or behavioral interventions alone because it provides the ideal balance of both.

Medication-assisted treatment integrates FDA-approved medications, social support methods, and behavioral therapies. 

This three-pronged approach provides a holistic, effective, and sustainable treatment method.

Our addictions do not form overnight. We cannot expect them to be solved that way, either.

An effective recovery requires addressing both the behavioral and biological components of addiction. MAT is an excellent way to achieve this goal. 

How MAT Promotes Sustained Sobriety and Reduces Relapse Rates

To demonstrate how useful medication-assisted treatment can be, let’s focus for a moment on one of its most common uses: opioid addiction treatments.

Prescription and illicit opioids alike come with a high risk of abuse and addiction. 

That is one reason why it is one of the most common addictions in the country. Many of these addictions start innocently enough.

One study revealed that up to 80% of heroin users had used prescription opioids first. 

Two of the most common were the prescription painkillers Vicodin and OxyContin.

Unfortunately, even when they come with a prescription, these medications can be dangerous, and dependence can develop quickly. 

Once dependence develops, many will graduate to something stronger to achieve the effects they felt when they started using opioids.

This is where things become more problematic.

Heroin, fentanyl, and other high-level opioids tend to come with overwhelming withdrawal symptoms that make it harder to quit, even when your urge to quit is strong. 

Medications like methadone and buprenorphine can help.

These carefully administered medications help satisfy drug cravings and reduce or eliminate other common withdrawal symptoms to promote sustained sobriety and reduce relapse rates. 

Drugs Used for Medication Assisted Treatment

Drugs Used for Medication Assisted Treatment

Methadone and buprenorphine are two of the most common opioid use disorder medications.

It may seem strange to treat opioid addiction with another opioid, but these medications have proven effective in the appropriate dosages and monitored medical settings. 

The amounts of these medications that we prescribe are too low to produce euphoric highs but substantial enough to promote several positive effects during recovery.

They are not meant to be used as substitutes but rather short-term aids during treatment. 

When used in appropriate dosages and under the supervision of a professional, they will not promote new addictions.

Instead, they will ease cravings and withdrawals, reducing your risk of relapse and clearing the path to sustained sobriety. 

Other Uses for Medication-Assisted Treatment

While it tends to be the most common in opioid disorder treatments, MAT is useful in treating other addictions, too. Medications are also common in alcohol treatments.

There are three approved substances for this purpose, including naltrexone, disulfiram, and acamprosate. 

The right approach is often the key to addiction recovery, which is why we offer a wide variety of customized treatment programs and methods to help everyone we meet find their way.

Many different addictions may warrant medication-assisted treatment. 

We can help you determine which treatment path will best fit your unique addiction and needs. 

Therapy and Medication-Assisted Treatment

We mentioned earlier that the most effective way to treat many addictions is to combine medication and behavioral therapies.

We need them both because they help us achieve different goals. 

While medications like the ones we provide will help ease cravings and other withdrawal symptoms, behavioral therapies help us gain a better understanding of how and why we got here.

This typically involves identifying root causes, improving the symptoms of common co-existing mental health disorders, and learning how to cope with feelings of stress or anger in healthier ways. 

Building healthier habits and coping mechanisms can help us reroute our natural responses to life’s inevitable challenges.

With our proven treatment methods, we help our clients break free from the things that are holding them back. 

It’s time to leave your addiction behind you and create a happier, healthier life that you can be proud of and excited about. 

Pathfinders Programs, A Path to Recovery

Our dedicated addiction teams are prepared to help with a wide range of addictions, withdrawal symptoms, mental health symptoms, and other needs.

To ensure that we can help our clients at any stage of the recovery process, we offer: 

  • Detox programs
  • Residential programs
  • Partial hospitalization programs 
  • Intensive outpatient programs 
  • Long-term rehab options 

A Breakdown of Our Addiction Treatment Programs

A Breakdown of Our Addiction Treatment Programs

Residential and long-term rehab programs are the only two that give you 24-hour access to the care, support, and guidance of our dedicated teams.

These programs are ideal for those with moderate to severe addictions and withdrawal symptoms or a history of relapse, among others. 

And they typically start with a personalized detox. But not everyone will need or be capable of committing to a full-time program.

That’s where our other programs come in. Partial hospitalization averages around 20 hours per week. 

Partial hospitalization programs are one of the most common treatment options for those affected by both mental illness and addiction.

The final option is an intensive outpatient program. An intensive outpatient program ranges from 9 to 19 hours per week. 

During each type of treatment program, many of the treatment methods remain the same.

Behavioral therapies are common across the board because they are some of the most effective addiction treatment methods. 

Different programs are better for different people and addictions. We can help you choose the path that will help you the most. 

MAT at Pathfinders Recovery Center

In Colorado and Arizona, we operate conveniently located and luxury-style recovery facilities.

In a safe and comfortable facility like ours, it becomes easier to maintain your focus, boost your confidence, and build a better life.

Call (866) 263-1820 for more information now!

Ted Talks on Addiction

Ted Talks on Addiction

What Are Ted Talks?

Ted Talks are conferences organized by a nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas.

Typically, Ted Talk videos are short and powerful talks you can listen to for free in 18 minutes or less. The speakers are experts in their fields. 

The topics cover a wide range, from activism to virtual reality.

The tagline for these videos is “ideas worth spreading.” And when we consider how popular they have become, this tagline seems fitting. 

Top Ted Talks on Drug Addiction

Top Ted Talks on Drug Addiction

Addiction, whether to drugs, alcohol, or something else, is a widespread issue.

This is why we weren’t surprised to find that there are countless inspirational videos and talks relating to addiction and recovery.

But with so many options to sift through, how do we choose? 

We want to make it easy for you to find the information you need, so we sifted through tons of content to find the top Ted Talks on addiction for you. 

A Breakdown of Our Top Three Ted Talks on Addiction

Gabor Mate, in the power of addiction and the addiction of power Ted Talk, uses his background as a physician and specialist to evaluate why we become addicted to anything.

He links addiction to the lack of love, the desire to escape, and susceptibility. 

In Hari’s TED Talk, titled everything you think you know about addiction is wrong, this expert dives into the root causes of addiction.

And not just to drugs and booze. In the video, he asks the question: what really causes addiction – to everything from cocaine to smartphones? 

Dr. Volkow is the director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse and a world leader in the neurobiology of diseases involving our reward and self-control systems.

Addiction is one example of this type of disease. Obesity is another example. 

She delves into these systems and the ways that addiction affects them in her video, why do our brains get addicted?

These are some of the best addiction recovery videos available today.

Addiction and connection Ted Talks like these can help compassionately and conversationally shed light on this complex and sensitive topic. 

Ted Talks on Mindfulness and Addiction

Ted Talks on Mindfulness and Addiction

Another Ted Talk that may be interesting to those in or approaching recovery is how childhood trauma affects health across a lifetime.

This one is a meaningful discussion on healing from childhood trauma and why that it is so important. 

While it is not specifically about addiction, pediatrician Nadine Burke takes a deep dive into the ways that we carry our traumas from childhood into adolescence and adulthood.

Individuals with a family history of high stress, abuse, neglect, mental health conditions, or substance abuse problems carry the weight of these events with them. 

In the video, she tells us that those who experience high levels of trauma are three times more likely to develop heart disease or lung cancer later in life.

She stresses the importance of preventing and treating trauma in maintaining our health throughout life’s various stages. 

Since trauma, stress, mental health issues, and feelings of neglect are often linked to drug and alcohol addiction, this video is much more relevant to us than it may look at first glance.

Being mindful of and treating the root cause of an addiction is crucial to recovery. 

Similarly, Judson Brewer’s Ted Talk, “A Simple Way to Break a Bad Habit,” explains the motivation behind a whole range of addictive behaviors to make them more understandable.

This acclaimed psychiatrist acknowledges that addiction is not simple, but our approach to overcoming it can be. 

He uses mindfulness exercises and simple techniques to help patients break the habit of addiction.

In his insightful speech, he talks about the profound results you can find simply by paying more attention to something. 

His studies on the link between addiction and mindfulness offer a fascinating glimpse into the ways we make and break habits.   

Key Takeaways from Ted Talks on Addiction

Addiction is not a weakness; it is a disease. It undermines the functions of our systems responsible for reward, self-control, and motivation.

Overcoming addiction requires making meaningful connections and understanding this important distinction. 

The opposite of addiction is not sobriety; the opposite of addiction is connection.

Connection to our true selves, to each other, to nature, and to other things that are important to us.

By building more meaningful connections, we can stop using drugs or alcohol as a crutch. 

For some people, this might mean joining a book club, learning to paint, taking exercise classes, learning a new language, or simply spending some with supportive loved ones.

In the Johann Hari Ted Talk, “Everything You Think You Know About Addiction is Wrong,” he discusses an interesting study often referred to as Rat Park. 

Rat Park – A Study of How Environment Impacts Addiction

The study we mentioned above was run by a professor of psychology in Vancouver in the 1970s.

In this professor’s experiment, he built a cage called Rat Park for his test subjects.

He loaded the cage up with cheese, colored balls, tunnels, and friends. 

He also provided two separate water bottles – one filled with normal water and another filled with drug water.

In Rat Park, the rats did not enjoy the drug water and almost never used it. None used it compulsively. None ever overdosed. 

But rats in isolation with access to the same drug water overdosed 100% of the time.

This means that his test subjects went from a 100% overdose rate in isolation to a 0% overdose rate when they had happy, connected lives. 

This professor posited that addiction is often about your cage, an adaptation to your environment.

He maintains that when we are happy and healthy, we bond and connect with each other.

But trauma, isolation, and mental health disorders can make this bonding difficult. 

When we lack healthy connections, we often bond with something that will provide relief instead.

Having meaningful people, events, careers, and activities to bond with can help us prevent this.

This might mean choosing a less stressful job, building a sober social network, participating in support groups or other healthy group activities, or improving existing relationships. 

Treatment for Addiction – What Are My Options?

Treatment for Addiction – What Are My Options

Behavioral therapies, support groups, and stress management training are a few of the pillars of recovery.

In each of our programs, we aim to help our clients understand and overcome the root causes of their addictions. 

By building a foundation of understanding first, many people are better able to maintain their sobriety even as challenges inevitably arise.

We will teach you how to build healthy habits, coping mechanisms, and support systems you can rely on. 

From detox through aftercare, we will work with you to ensure that you get the care you need, when and how you need it.

We offer a convenient and diverse range of inpatient, outpatient, and hybrid programs to meet a wide range of unique addiction needs. 

Choosing Pathfinders Recovery Center

When you choose Pathfinders, you choose dedicated professionals, personalized programs, and proven techniques.

There are no one-size-fits-all solutions here.

Call us today at (866) 263-1820 to see the difference a Pathfinders approach can make.

Lean Addiction and Abuse (Purple Drank)

Lean addiction, as shown by cough syrup being poured into spoon

What is Lean Addiction?

While it may not be one of the most well-known drugs of choice, lean addiction is a growing problem in the United States.

Lean is an illicit substance that combines codeine cough syrup with soda and hard candy.

Lean contains codeine, which can be highly addictive, and it is especially abused by young people.

A bottle of cough syrup being poured into a cup, illustrates the dangers of lean addiction

Understanding Lean

When lean was first invented, it was mixed with beer.

Later, lean was instead made with soda with a hard candy for added sweetness.

The drink gained popularity after being mentioned in many popular rap songs in the 1980s and 1990s.

Many rappers have since died after developing a lean addiction. Lean is also called “purple drank,” “dirty sprite,” and “sizzurp.”

Lean’s main ingredient codeine is an opioid. This drug is made from the opium poppy plant.

When you take an opioid, it affects areas in your brain that control your “reward system.” This means that it makes you feel relaxed, happy, and euphoric.

Opioids are also highly addictive. Once you begin abusing lean, your brain very quickly becomes dependent on it and makes you crave it.

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What are the Effects of Lean Addiction?

When taken for short periods of time, codeine cough syrups help you by blocking the urge to cough.

They also make you feel relaxed. However, they can have negative effects even when taken correctly.

These can include drowsiness, confusion, constipation, depression, nausea, vomiting, and slowed breathing.

If you have a lean addiction, these symptoms can become worse over time.

Frequent lean abuse can have even more serious side effects.

One of these side effects called hypoxia is especially dangerous.

Hypoxia is a condition where not enough oxygen reaches the brain and can happen when codeine makes your breathing slow too much.

Hypoxia can cause both short-term and long-term health problems, including brain damage, coma, and even death.

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How Can You Abuse Lean?

Lean is a drug that has no medical purposes. Taking it just once counts as drug abuse.

If you take it frequently or for long periods of time, it is very easy to develop a lean addiction.

If you are not sure whether you are addicted to lean, here are some questions that you can ask yourself:

  • Are you taking larger amounts of lean or using it more frequently than you used to?
  • Have you tried to cut down or stop taking lean but find that you cannot?
  • Do you spend a lot of time getting codeine cough syrup to make lean, or dealing with the side effects?
  • Do you crave lean when you are not taking it?
  • Are you having issues at work, school, or home?
  • Have you stopped doing things you used to enjoy so that you can take lean?
  • Do you need to take lean in order to feel happy or relaxed?
  • Do you experience withdrawal symptoms if you stop taking lean?

If you can answer “yes” to any of these questions, there is a good chance that you have a lean addiction.

Now may be the time to consider getting in touch with Pathfinders Recovery Center to learn about our lean addiction rehab options.

Mental Illness and Lean Addiction

Because lean contains codeine, it can have the same negative effects on your mental health that any other opioid causes.

People who have a lean addiction are twice as likely to suffer from at least one mental health condition.

The most common issues are aggression, anxiety, depression, hallucinations, and mood swings.

If you had a mental health issue before your lean addiction, you will most likely find that taking lean makes them worse.

People who already have depression, anxiety, or bipolar disorder are at a higher risk of abusing drugs like lean.

This often happens because a person tries to treat their mental health symptoms with lean.

In the short term, this can trick your brain into thinking that you feel better.

In the long run, it just makes your mental health symptoms worse.

No matter when your mental health problems first appeared, it is important that you discuss them with the team at Pathfinders Recovery Center.

Having both your lean addiction and mental health symptoms treated is going to be key to helping you overcome your addiction.

Rows of cough syrup and empty cups show the reality of lean addiction

Withdrawal from Lean Addiction

Having a purple drank addiction means that your brain is dependent on the codeine in this drug.

If you try to take less or stop taking it entirely, you can experience withdrawal symptoms. Much like any other opioid addiction, these symptoms usually come in two parts.

The first part will usually start within a day of stopping purple drank, though for serious purple drank addictions it may start within just a few hours.

The first symptoms can include anxiety, agitation, insomnia, muscle aches, watery eyes, runny nose, or sweating.

The second part of withdrawal then begins in another day or two, and is usually more severe.

They can include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, dilated pupils, and goose bumps.

Purple drank addiction withdrawal symptoms usually peak about three days after stopping, and then slowly go away.

The entire withdrawal process usually takes about a week. For people with a very serious purple drank addiction, it can take a little longer.

These symptoms are very rarely life-threatening, but they can still make you feel extremely uncomfortable.

That is why Pathfinders offers a medical detox program. This allows us to help our clients be more comfortable during detox by providing medications to make the symptoms less noticeable and easier to deal with.

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Treatment Options for Lean Addiction

When it comes to getting treatment for your lean addiction, we have a number of different program options for you.

For people who are abusing opioid drugs like lean, our medication-assisted treatment program (MAT) is one of the most effective options.

MAT uses both medications and behavioral therapy to help you get through detox and treat the underlying reasons behind your lean addiction.

The medications we use help to both make withdrawal more comfortable and reduce your cravings for lean.

Therapy, both in individual and group sessions, helps you better understand why you ended up with this addiction.

It also helps give you tools to avoid drug use triggers, and ways to better manage your stress.

Both of these things help you to avoid using lean, and reduce your chances of experiencing a relapse.

Behavioral therapy will also help address any mental health symptoms you have been experiencing.

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Getting the Help You Need at a Quality Rehab Center

We know that no one starts using purple drank with the idea of becoming addicted to it.

Just because you have developed a problem does not mean that you have to live with it.

At Pathfinders Recovery Center, we know exactly what it takes to get your life back from the difficulty of addiction.

Our premier addiction treatment centers are located in upscale areas throughout the Scottsdale, Arizona area.

Our luxury locations provide you with a comfortable and home-like atmosphere so that our clients feel safe and secure throughout their treatment program.

We help to ensure your success by using only scientifically researched, cutting edge, and effective drug and alcohol addiction treatment programs.

We have over 25 years of experience in helping people with addictions and co-occurring disorders to overcome their addictions.

Many of our clients wonder whether they will be able to take advantage of their health insurance benefits to help cover their treatment.

That is why we accept most major insurances through our free insurance verification.

Simply give us a call, and one of our addiction specialists can check to see how much of your treatment program will be covered by your insurance before you begin treatment.

You can trust us to communicate with your insurance provider to ensure that you receive every benefit that you are entitled to.

A lean addiction is nothing to be ashamed of and seeking help does not have to be a difficult process.

Let us use our years of experience to help you get on the path to a meaningful and lasting recovery.

Contact us today and see the difference stopping your drug abuse can make in your life.

Painkiller Addiction Among Suburban Housewives

Illustration of woman trapped in pill bottle, to show painkiller addiction

Painkiller Addiction Among Suburban Housewives May Be On the Rise

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2 million Americans began abusing prescription painkillers in 2017, which means painkiller addiction among suburban housewives may be on the rise.

Prescription painkillers like Vicodin and Percocet are safe for treating short-term pain, but people may abuse them because they are highly addictive and can make a person feel very relaxed.

Women may be especially vulnerable to the effects of prescription pills used to treat pain because research shows that women are more sensitive to pain than men are, and they are at a greater risk of prescription painkiller abuse.

This means that a woman who is prescribed opiates following surgery or to treat a chronic pain condition can find herself becoming addicted.

People may think that the abuse of prescription pills only occurs in poor, urban areas, but the reality is that painkiller addiction among suburban housewives is a real concern.

Painkiller abuse is widespread and can affect anyone.

Close-up of a woman's mouth opening to accept a spoonful of pills, to illustrate painkiller addiction

How Painkiller Addictions Develops

Suburban housewives may begin taking prescription pills for legitimate reasons, such as to treat pain following a surgery or injury, but painkiller addictions develop because of the properties of prescription painkillers.

Per the National Institute on Drug Abuse, prescription painkillers have a relaxing effect and can make a person feel high, which can lead some people to abuse them.

Painkiller addiction may develop when a person takes larger doses than a doctor prescribes, or when they use prescription pills to get high.

It is also important to understand that prescription painkillers increase the levels of a brain chemical called dopamine, which has a rewarding effect.

Over time, people may also develop a tolerance for prescription pills, meaning they will need larger doses of pills to experience the same effects.

This can cause women to seek out more prescription pills, ultimately leading to painkiller addiction.

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The Dangers of Painkiller Addiction and Abuse

Some people may think that painkiller addiction is not a serious concern since painkillers are prescription pills with legitimate medical uses, but this could not be further from the truth. The National Institute on Drug Abuse warns of the negative effects of painkiller abuse, which can include drowsiness, constipation, confusion, and nausea.
In large doses, prescription painkillers can cause slowed breathing and even cut off the supply of oxygen to the brain. This can cause serious complications, such as brain damage, coma, and even death.
Another consequence of abusing prescription pills is the development of a painkiller addiction, which often requires drug rehab.

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Signs of Painkiller Addiction

When a woman develops a painkiller addiction, an addiction treatment professional will diagnose a substance use disorder, which is the clinical term for an addiction. Symptoms of a substance use disorder, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, include strong drug cravings, being unable to reduce drug use, and using larger amounts of drugs than intended.
Other symptoms can include using drugs even when it causes health problems, continuing to use prescription pills despite trouble fulfilling duties at work, home, or school, and giving up other activities in favor of drug use.
Suburban housewives who find that they are forgoing parenting and household duties or giving up leisure time activities because of drug use, or who are finding that they cannot stop using prescription pills, may have developed a painkiller addiction, even if a doctor is prescribing the medication.

Painkiller Addiction and Withdrawal

Withdrawal is one of the reasons that drug rehab is often necessary for women who struggle with painkiller addiction. Painkiller withdrawal occurs because over time, the body becomes physically dependent upon prescription pills. Once a person stops using these drugs, the body has to adapt and therefore experiences withdrawal symptoms.
Prescription painkiller withdrawal can be extremely unpleasant, making it difficult for a person to stop using these drugs. For example, a woman who is a suffering from painkiller addiction may experience sleep disturbances, goose bumps, cold sweats, involuntary leg movements, diarrhea, vomiting, and pain in the muscles and bones when withdrawing from prescription painkillers.
A drug rehab can offer a detox program, where medical staff provide care, support, and supervision to women as their bodies rid themselves of drugs. This can keep them as safe and as comfortable as possible as they go through withdrawal from prescription pills.

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Treatment for Prescription Painkiller Addiction

Since prescription painkillers are so addictive and can lead to uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms, it is often difficult for women to stop using these pills without going to drug rehab.
If you have been struggling with addiction to prescription pills, a drug rehab program will often begin your treatment plan with a stay in detox to help you through the withdrawal process. According to experts, a doctor working in a drug rehab program may prescribe medications like methadone or buprenorphine to help with drug cravings and withdrawal symptoms as you detox from prescription painkillers.
After completing detox, it is important to continue your drug rehab journey with an ongoing program that includes behavioral treatments like counseling. A type of counseling like cognitive behavioral therapy can help you to cope with triggers and stress that might lead to drug use and teach you healthier ways of thinking about drugs.
A combination of medication and counseling is usually the best approach for treating addiction, so you may continue to take a medication like buprenorphine or methadone while engaged in ongoing drug rehab.

Woman holds up a opioid pill she's taking with a worried look, to demonstrate painkiller addiction

Drug Rehab for Painkiller Addiction in Colorado and Arizona

If you are struggling with painkiller addiction, and you are ready to seek drug rehab, Pathfinders Recovery Center has locations in Colorado and Arizona. We are also happy to accept patients from surrounding areas.
Pathfinders offers various levels of treatment, including residential, partial hospitalization, and outpatient. We also offer a detox program. If you are living with a painkiller addiction, your treatment journey with us will likely begin with detox, so you can be safe and comfortable while your body goes through withdrawal from prescription pills.
After you complete detox, our team will help you to determine the best type of treatment for your specific situation. We are a premier drug rehab center, and our leadership team has over 25 years of experience in the addiction field, so you can be confident that you are getting the best care possible for your painkiller addiction.
We are also considered a dual diagnosis treatment center, meaning we can treat both addiction and mental illness.

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Paying for Drug Rehab

Once you have decided it is time to go to drug rehab for prescription pills, you have to determine how you will pay for treatment.

At Pathfinders Recovery Center, we offer an online insurance verification program so you can find out how much it will cost you to attend treatment.

Simply fill out a form on our website, and a member of our team will contact you to tell you what your insurance covers and how much you can expect to pay out-of-pocket.

We can also create a cash payment plan if you do not plan to pay for treatment with insurance.

Contact us today to begin your journey toward sobriety.

How Long Do Drugs Stay in Your System

A gloved hand dips a test strip into urine, to show 'Close-up of drug testing form, to indicate answers to 'How Long Do Drugs Stay in Your System'

If you are undergoing a drug test, you are likely wondering, “How long do drugs stay in your system?”

The answer to this question varies depending upon the type of drug.

For example, as the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has explained, drugs stay in your system for different amounts of time based upon their chemical properties, such as the drug’s half-life.

Some drugs may be eliminated from the body more quickly than others.

In addition to variations depending on the type of drug, there are also other factors, such as your personal health and the type of testing used.

 

Lean (Purple Drank) Addiction and Abuse Pathfinders - A young woman speaks with an addiction specialist during an individual therapy session to discuss her addiction to sipping lean or drinking purple drank to try and determine the best treatment plan for her specific circumstances and needs.

How Long Do Drugs Stay In Your Urine?

Since urine testing is a common form of drug screening, people often want to know “How long do drugs stay in your urine?”

Again, this can vary depending on the type of substance, but the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration states that most drugs stay in urine for two to four days.

That being said, how long drugs stay in your urine is also dependent upon how long you have been using and how high of a dose you typically use.

Higher doses and more frequent drug use can be detected in urine for longer periods of time, because ongoing drug use causes drugs to build up in the body.

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How Long Do Drugs Stay in Your Urine?: Variations Based on Drug Type

As previously stated with urine testing, how long drugs stay in your system depends upon the type of drug you have been using.
Per the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, cocaine is eliminated from the system pretty quickly, so if you use the drug one time, a urine test will only detect within one day. On the other hand, if you have been using cocaine on a daily basis, it will probably stay in your system for two to three days.
Marijuana tends to stay in your system a little longer, especially if you are a chronic user. With occasional use, marijuana will likely be cleared from your system within three days, but if you are a daily user, it can take five to 10 days for it to leave your body. Furthermore, if you are a chronic marijuana user, it can be detected in your urine for up to a month.
How long do drugs stay in your urine is also applicable to benzodiazepines, a type of prescription drug that people abuse for their sedative effects. With a prescribed dose, these drugs are eliminated from the body in three to seven days, but with chronic use, it can take a month for benzodiazepines to leave your system.
According to a how long do drugs stay in your system chart from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, methamphetamine stays in urine for two to four days; opiates are eliminated in one to three days, and ecstasy is detectable in urine for one to five days

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How Long Do Drugs Stay in Your System Using Other Methods?

Urine testing is not the only method for determining how long do drugs stay in your system. Some people also wonder “How long do drugs stay in your saliva?” As the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has explained, saliva testing can only detect very recent drug use. Most drugs can only be detected in saliva for 12 to 24 hours after you use them, but marijuana may only be detected in saliva for four to 10 hours after the last use.
Another method for testing for drugs is hair testing. This method is less popular but can detect drugs that have been used in the past four months; however, it can take up to a week after drug use for hair follicles to absorb drugs.

Recap: How Long Do Drugs Stay in Your System?

The answer to the question, “How long do drugs stay in your system?” varies depending upon the type of drug you use, how long you have been using, and what method is used to detect drug use.
For instance, marijuana and benzodiazepines may remain in the system via a urine screen for longer than cocaine, especially with long-term use. In general, drugs will stay in the urine for two to four days and in the saliva for up to one day. Hair testing can detect drug use over several months.
While these are general estimates of how long drugs stay in your system, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration explains that other factors, such as your general health, metabolism, exercise habits, fluid intake, diet, gender, and exercise habits can affect how long drugs stay in your urine.

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Seeking Treatment For Drug Addiction

If you are asking, “How long do drugs stay in your system?,” chances are that you have been struggling with drug use and might be worried that a positive drug test will get you in trouble or cause you to lose your job. If this is the case, you may have developed an addiction.
According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the clinical term for a drug addiction is a substance use disorder. Symptoms of a substance use disorder include strong drug cravings, being unable to cut back on drug use, and continuing to use drugs despite serious consequences, such as health problems or difficulty fulfilling duties at work or home.
If you have developed a substance use disorder, you will likely need drug rehab to help you stop using. As experts explain, drug rehab can involve behavioral treatments like therapy in addition to medications that treat addiction.

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Drug Rehab in Colorado and Arizona

Once you realize that you need help for drug addiction, it is time to reach out to a drug rehab center. If you are looking for rehab in Colorado or Arizona, Pathfinders Recovery Center has facilities in both states, and we are happy to provide treatment to patients from surrounding areas.
We are a premier dual diagnosis treatment center, meaning we are qualified to treat both addiction and mental illness. Our leadership team has over 25 years of experience, and we offer various levels of treatment, including detox, residential, partial hospitalization, and outpatient.

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Paying for Drug Rehab

You may be worried about covering the costs of drug rehab, even if you know seeking treatment is the best choice.

Pathfinders can take some of the stress out of the equation for you by offering a free insurance verification program.

By filling out a quick form on our website, you can learn how much of your treatment your insurance plan will cover, as well as what you can expect to pay out of pocket.

Even if you do not have insurance, Pathfinders can work with you to develop a cash payment plan.

Reach out to us today to determine how we can help you to recover from drug addiction and abuse.