Alcohol Rehab Treatment

Alcohol Rehab Pathfinders Recovery Center - drunk young man falls asleep at the bar with multiple drinks in front of him, as his loved ones and surrounding friends decide it may be time for him to attend alcohol rehab.

What is Alcohol Rehab?

When someone who is abusing alcohol finds they are unable to stop drinking, it may be time to consider attending alcohol rehab.

Many people think of those who struggle with alcohol misuse are a certain age or type of person, but this is far from the truth.

There are a few different types of individuals that struggle with alcoholism, and all of them have to deal with ways this chronic disease affects their brain and their body — among many other factors.

Over 14 million American adults struggle with alcoholism, and 95,000 die each year from an alcohol-related illness.

No matter what type you are, seeking the help of an alcohol rehab program is the best way to overcome your addiction.

Alcohol Rehab Pathfinders Recovery Center - drunk young man falls asleep at the bar with multiple drinks in front of him, as his loved ones and surrounding friends decide it may be time for him to attend alcohol rehab.

What is Alcoholism?

What most individuals struggling with alcohol use disorder have in common is they drink alcohol frequently or in very large quantities.

Alcoholism is considered a chronic disease because of how it changes the way the brain works. When you drink, your brain releases dopamine, a chemical that makes you feel happy and relaxed. The longer you abuse alcohol, the more you will have to drink to feel these effects.

Over time, your brain forgets how to release dopamine naturally. This makes your brain crave alcohol to make you feel good. This is what makes alcoholism a chronic disease. It is very challenging for those who struggle with alcoholism to stop drinking, even when they know it is causing problems with their health.

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Understanding the Types of Alcoholics

There are many stereotypes regarding people who have a drinking problem, from not being able to hold down a job to not caring about their physical appearance.

There is no such thing as one type of alcoholic. Alcoholism can affect people of any age with any background, no matter how successful they are in their careers.

When it comes to the different types of alcoholics, there are typically five main groups:

  • Young Antisocial:
    This type of alcoholic begins drinking very young, usually around the age of 15 years old. Some of these young people may have a mental illness as well, such as an antisocial personality disorder, which makes them impulsive and uncaring of the physical dangers of alcohol.

 

  • Young Adult:
    This type of alcoholic begins showing impulsive behaviors when they are around 20 years old. They typically do not drink every day, but instead, binge drink two or more times per week. This is the most common type of alcoholic in the United States today.

 

  • Functional:
    This type of alcoholic usually has a higher level of education and income level. They also tend to have more stable personal relationships than other types of alcoholics. Functional alcoholics are usually binge drinkers who consume alcohol at least every other day.

 

  • Intermediate Familial:
    This type of alcoholic usually has a close family member who either had or has a drinking issue. These people usually begin drinking when they are around 17 years old in order to try and cope with family stress.

 

  • Chronic Severe:
    This type of alcoholic has the most severe symptoms and issues. Most chronic severe alcoholics are men and, as a result, have a high rate of divorce because of their drinking. They also have a high rate of abusing other drugs along with alcohol.

 

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The Effects of Alcohol Abuse

For all types of alcoholics, alcohol poses a serious risk to their health.

This is because alcoholism can create a wide range of negative symptoms and long-term health problems.

Certified alcoholics can experience heart problems, including high blood pressure, irregular heartbeats, and heart attacks. They often also experience problems with their livers. These problems can include fatty liver, liver fibrosis, and cirrhosis.

Alcoholism can weaken your immune system, making it more likely that you will deal with things like colds, the flu, and pneumonia. One of the more dangerous risks for the different types of alcoholics is an increased risk of certain cancers. Alcohol increases your chances of getting liver, throat, esophageal, colon, and breast cancers.

Attending an alcohol rehab program as soon as you realize you have a drinking problem will avoid some of these issues.

Alcohol Rehab Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of individuals attending alcohol rehab at a residential rehab facility engage in discussion regarding healthy coping strategies to avoid relapsing.

Mental Illness and the Certified Alcoholic

Many people who are certified alcoholics also deal with mental health issues.

Anyone struggling with alcoholism has an increased chance of either developing a mental health issue or worsening one they already had. This is because alcohol changes your moods and your behaviors. Alcohol makes it harder for you to think clearly.

When abused, it also changes the way that your brain sends chemicals that make you feel happy and relaxed. Over time, your brain gets used to relying on alcohol to release these chemicals, which makes it difficult for you to feel happy from anything else. This can make you feel anxious and depressed.

And, eventually, these mental health symptoms can affect your personal relationships and your performance at work or school. This can lead to losing your job, dropping out of school, and divorce. Many people who have alcohol abuse issues also suffer from anger issues, which can cause further problems with their loved ones.

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Treatment Options for the Different Types of Alcoholics

Much like other types of addictions, there are many alcohol rehab treatment options available depending on your specifics needs and level of addiction.

For the most serious addictions, the first step is detox. At Pathfinders Recovery Center, we offer medical detox options to our clients. This allows us to help make your detox symptoms less uncomfortable.

Once this is complete, we can move on to a behavioral therapy program.

There are three main therapy options that work best for alcohol rehab: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET), and Family Counseling.

CBT helps you to see the thoughts and behaviors that lead to your drinking. It also teaches healthy ways to manage stress and avoid things that trigger you to drink.

MET is a way that helps you build positive motivations to avoid relapsing.

Lastly, family counseling focuses on working to repair any family relationships that have been damaged by addiction or alcoholism. These sessions take place with your family members and can include your spouse, children, parents, other family members, or close friends. Being able to build a stronger family system helps your family heal from any emotional damage, as well as increases your chances of staying sober.

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Getting the Help You Need for Your Alcohol Addiction

At Pathfinders Recovery Center, we know exactly what it takes to get your life back from the cycle and negative effects of addiction.

That is why you can trust our alcohol rehab programs to help you overcome your dependence on this substance.

Our luxury locations provide a comfortable and home-like atmosphere so that our clients feel safe and secure throughout the length of their treatment program.

We only use only scientifically-researched, cutting-edge, and effective drug and alcohol addiction treatment programs.

We have over 25 years of experience in helping people with addictions and co-occurring disorders overcome their struggles and live a happy, healthy, and sober life.

Many of our clients wonder whether or not they will be able to take advantage of their health insurance benefits to help cover their treatment. That is why we offer free insurance verification.

Simply give us a call and one of our addiction specialists can check to see how much of your treatment program will be covered by your insurance before you begin treatment.

You can trust us to communicate with your insurance provider to ensure that you receive every benefit that you are entitled to.

For all types of alcoholics, experiencing health problems from your drinking is a serious risk.

Let us use our years of experience to get you on the right path to a meaningful and lasting recovery.

See the difference getting sober can make in your life.

Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies

Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies Pathfinders Recovery Center - A family all holding hands together, an analogy for exploring the link between family genetics and addiction tendencies.

We often hear of people having an addictive personality, or even that addiction runs in families.

It does bring up the question: “Why does one person get addicted to drugs or alcohol and another doesn’t? Is addiction linked to genetics?”

Is it possible to be predisposed to addiction? Is there a genetic link to addiction? If your parent or relative struggles with drug or alcohol addiction, do family genetics mean there’s no hope for you?

We’re going to answer all of these questions for you in this article.

Keep reading to learn about the genetic predisposition to addiction and general addiction tendencies based on your DNA.

What Is Addiction?

The American Society of Addiction Medicine states that addiction is a direct effect of the reward and motivational part of our brains being affected by an overwhelming need to “pursue reward or relief by substance use and behaviors.”

Alcohol addiction is one of the most common addictions in the United States.

An estimated 15.1 million people have an alcohol use disorder (AUD).

While most of us immediately think of alcoholism when we think of addiction, you can be addicted to many different substances and/or behaviors.

Some other examples of common addictions include:

  • Tobacco
  • Opioids
  • Sex
  • Cocaine
  • Benzos
  • Gambling

Any substance or behavior that affects your pleasure and/or reward system in the brain has the potential to become an addiction.

Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies Pathfinders - A husband and father is pouring another drink at the dining room table while his wife and daughter stand behind him depressed and watching him suffer with his alcoholism, as he wonders whether addiction is linked to genetics or not before seeking treatment.

Is Addiction a Disease?

Addiction is defined as a chronic disease of the brain that affects you mentally, physically, and socially.

Addiction directly disrupts normal brain function that impairs your judgment, learning, motivation, memory, and reward/relief systems.

Genetic Links to Addiction

As with other diseases, there are a number of factors that contribute to the development of the disease.

These factors include social settings, environmental factors, behavioral factors, and family genetics.

Let’s get a little bit more into the genetic predisposition associated with addiction.

“Addiction Genes”

There has been a scientific effort to uncover the specific genes that would result in addiction and drug abuse disorders.

This brings up two questions: “Why would there be genes for addiction anyway? If addiction is so harmful, shouldn’t those types of genes have already been eliminated from our population due to natural selection?”

Some argue that “addiction genes” may have helped our early ancestors to promote motivation and feelings of pleasure/reward for things like gathering food, procreating, etc. Once these genes are in place to reward us, it can affect how we behave with other things that give us pleasure, like drugs and alcohol.

There has been some success in finding particular “addiction genes.” As with most things concerning genetics, there is no one specific “addiction gene.” Instead, it’s a complex system of different genes and chemicals that can lead to addictive tendencies.

One common gene found in many drug addicts and alcoholics is a gene that affects dopamine receptors in the brain, specifically the DRD2 gene.

Dopamine is this “feel good” chemical in your brain. When you do something pleasurable (like drugs), your brain releases dopamine, which makes you feel good and makes you want to do more of that thing.

If your dopamine receptors are changed or more receptive to dopamine, it could make it easier to become addicted to drugs.

This is just one example of a potential “addiction gene” found by scientists. Hundreds of other genes can contribute to a predisposition to addiction. See some more examples here.

Twin Studies

Some of the most telling facts about addiction and genetics are genetics looking at family history and relatives with addiction.

Studies show that genetics amount to up to 50% of the likelihood that you’ll develop an addiction.

How do we know this? One study looked at over 1,000 sets of twins. Identical twins have the same genetic make-up. Therefore, if addiction were solely genetic, we would assume that if one twin had a substance abuse issue, the other twin would as well.

However, they found that if one twin had an addiction, the other twin was likely to have an addiction. But, they found that if one twin had an addiction, it didn’t mean the other twin had an addiction too.

In simple terms, this study found that genes have a large factor in addiction since the likelihood of twins having an addiction was high.

However, when one twin had an addiction, many of their twins with the same genes did not have an addiction.

This indicates that other factors that contribute to addiction besides genetics, even if addiction is linked to genetics.

Other studies support these findings.

This leads to the consensus that genetics amount to half of the predisposition/risk of developing an addiction.

Children of Parents Struggling with Addiction

When thinking about addiction’s genetic component, we have to look at the history of drug addiction in families.

One of the easiest ways to study the genetic links to addiction is to look at the children of those struggling with addiction.

These individuals struggling with substance abuse pass on their genes to their children. So, if there is a genetic link, logic tells us that the children of these individuals should also have substance abuse issues at one point or another. They should at least be at a much higher risk of addiction compared to children of those that do not have drug or alcohol issues.

And studies have found that this is, in fact, the case.

Children of those struggling with addiction are eight times more likely also to develop an addiction than children of individuals without substance abuse issues.

Another study showed that people who use drugs are more likely to have at least one parent that also uses drugs.

Is It Really Genetics? Digging Deeper

After everything we’ve just gone over, from the specific genetic findings to the family statistics, you might think it’s definite that genetics is the factor that causes addiction.

While it’s true addiction is linked to genetics, there are questions related to how much this means in terms of genetic predisposition.

However, we can’t ignore the behavioral and social aspects of family life that have nothing to do with genetics.

Children growing up with parents who normalize drug and alcohol use may simply use drugs because socially, it seemed normal. This doesn’t have to do with their genes; it has to do with their social environment.

While family statistics and studies show a link between genetics and addiction, it’s also important to remember that addiction is a complex disease with many factors, including social and behavioral factors.

Exploring the Link Between Family Genetics and Addiction Tendencies Pathfinders - A man struggling with substance abuse has decided to enter treatment after learning that addiction is linked to genetics and his parents struggled with addiction. He is taking part in an initial group therapy session to discuss his story and gain insight for healthy coping mechanisms to break free from addiction.

Other Factors that Can Lead to Addiction

Continuing with this idea, let’s look at some other factors that can contribute to addiction besides “addiction genes.”

Some of the most significant risk factors for addiction include:

  • Stress
  • Mental health disorders, such as depression, eating disorders, anxiety, etc.
  • Emotional/physical trauma
  • Peer pressure
  • Pop culture exposure
  • Easy access to drugs/alcohol
  • Social environment

Predisposition Is Not Certainty

This brings us to a very important point.

Just because you’re predisposed or have a higher risk of developing an addiction doesn’t mean you definitely will.

Your entire family could struggle with alcohol and drug abuse, and you could have multiple “addiction genes.”

But this does not mean addiction is inevitable for you.

If you feel you have many risk factors and can feel yourself potentially going down the wrong path, you can learn coping skills and enter treatment before an addiction develops.

Understanding your risks as a child or relative of someone who struggles with substance abuse can be a way to regulate your drug use. It can also help you understand you’re predisposed to addiction, which might motivate you to seek help before things get worse.

Each of these factors could lead to a higher risk of addiction, no matter what genes you have.

Addiction is complex and is the result of not one but many factors.

Genetics could be a big part of what leads someone down the addiction path, but it’s not the only factor. Although it is still essential to be aware that addiction is linked to genetics.

Family Genetics and Addiction: Bottom Line

You’ve probably heard that alcoholism is a family disease, and on some level, that’s true.

Addiction is linked to genetics and drug abuse disorders.

However, it’s also important to recognize that addiction is a complex disease that cannot be pinpointed on one factor or cause. It’s a myriad of social and biological triggers that come together to form the perfect storm known as addiction.

If you or a family member is struggling to stay sober, contact us today.

We can help those suffering from addiction overcome their reliance and live a healthier, more stable life.

 

What are Some Common Signs of a Drug Addict?

The Signs of a Drug Addict

Information regarding the signs of a drug addict is critical due to its prevalence in America.

Addiction to drugs is an epidemic that kills thousands of people every year.

Drug addiction transforms and hurts people’s lives.

If you think someone you know is susceptible to drug use or addiction, you should learn more about the signs, symptoms, and treatments for drug addiction.

Though addiction to drugs is hurtful and demanding to maintain, recovery is not an easy path either.

Drug addiction changes the brain’s pathways, causing a dependency in the body and compulsive use of the substance.

Even when addiction is hurting them and those they love, someone struggling with an addiction to drugs feels like they have no choice but to continue to use.

Learning and memorizing the signs of an addict or the signs of an addictive personality is essential for prevention and recovery.

Having this knowledge allows you to keep an eye out for those you love who may be vulnerable to drug addiction.

MedlinePlus lists the following as signs of a drug addict:

  • Changes in appetite
  • Loss of interest in favorite things
  • Spending a lot of time alone
  • Not practicing self-care
  • Quick changes in mood
  • Being very tired and sad
  • Changing friends more than usual
  • Having a lot of energy, chattering
  • Having issues in work or school
  • Having issues with family or friends

What are Some Common Signs of a Drug Addict? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of individuals in inpatient rehab that showed signs of a drug addict and decided to enter treatment is discussing experiences in their lives, healthy coping mechanisms, and supportive advice for one another as they work toward recovery and long-term sobriety.

Understanding the Signs of a Drug Addict

Knowledge of the signs of an addict is constructive, but it is crucial to know the next steps and how addiction occurs if you believe someone you love may suffer from addiction.

Drug addiction can develop quickly over a short period or slowly and invisibly. When a person begins using drugs, the effects on the body are intense and euphoric. Over time, if a person continues usage, the body needs more and more of the substance to produce a high.

Addiction forms when the body is dependent on the substance and usage is no longer voluntary. Drug use turns compulsive, and addicts feel as if they need the substance to survive. If that person discontinues the use of the drug, the body experiences intense withdrawal symptoms.

Certain people are more susceptible to drug addictions.

This information helps prevent drug use and addiction because concerned family members can implement positive drug-avoidance strategies.

MedlinePlus lists the following as risks for drug addiction:

  • Individual biology: some people are only less likely to enjoy drug use. If someone tries drugs once and hates them, they are much less likely to form an addiction. Addiction is more common in people who enjoy drug use.
  • Mental health issues.
  • Trouble at home: children, adults, and teens who have a difficult home life are more likely to develop a drug addiction.
  • Trouble with school, work or making friends.
  • Spending time with people who use drugs.
  • Starting drug use at a young age.

If you noticed these symptoms in a friend or a family member, speak to someone responsible and knowledgeable about these concerns.

Preventative measures or early interventions help stop addiction from forming.

After addiction forms, it is incredibly challenging to recover from.

If you believe you may help someone prevent addiction, acting sooner rather than later could save a life.

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Effects and Abuse of Drugs

Though it is best to prevent addiction early on, this is not always a possibility. Sometimes, the forming of habit is not an easy thing to see. By the time family members or friends spot the signs of an addict, addiction is already present.

Addiction causes both short and long-term effects on the body and mind. Familiarizing yourself with these effects allows you to help secure treatment for the person you think may struggle with addiction. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) lists the long and short-term risks of drug addiction as follows:

Short-term risks:

  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Overdose
  • Changes in sleep patterns, mood, heart rate, and appetite

Long-term increased risks:

  • Heart or lung disease
  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis
  • Mental illness

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Mental Illness and Drug Abuse

Drug abuse and mental illness commonly occur together in the same patient. Drug addiction often leads to mental illness and vice-versa. They are sometimes direct causes of one another, or they can develop together. They may occur together because they affect the same parts of the brain, according to the NIDA. It is also possible for people to turn to drugs because their mental disorder has made them feel upset, anxious, or distracted. Because of these factors, mental illnesses are sometimes signs of an addictive personality.

If mental illness and drug addiction occur together, patients must receive treatment for both issues. The presence of mental illness makes a recovery from drug addiction more difficult if not adequately addressed and treated. It is possible to overcome both mental health issues and drug addiction through treatment.

Common mental health issues to watch out for include:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • ADHD
  • Bipolar disorder

What are Some Common Signs of a Drug Addict? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A young man is sitting with an addiction specialist for an initial consultation to determine if he has the signs of a drug addict and if he requires treatment.

Treatment for the Signs of a Drug Addict

People who display the signs of an addict receive treatment from the expert staff at hospitals or rehabilitation centers. Treating drug addictions is in no way simple; relapse is common, and the body’s compulsive need for the drug makes maintenance of recovery extremely challenging. Though relapse often occurs and makes recovery much more challenging, it does not mean that treatment has not helped and recovery is impossible.

In fact, recovery is still possible even after multiple relapses.

According to the NIDA, there are three main goals of addiction treatment:

  1. Stopping drug use
  2. Maintaining a drug-free life
  3. Becoming or continuing to be a productive member of society.

Treatment is adjusted to fit what works best for each patient, so it involves trial and error.

Common treatments for the signs of a drug addict include medication, participation in support groups, counseling to diagnose mental health issues, and therapy.

In therapy, patients focus on understanding the reasons they became addicted to drugs in the first place. Therapy also teaches patients how to remain drug-free and avoid relapse. Support groups provide patients with an essential sense of camaraderie. Being surrounded by understanding people who have experienced similar things has excellent healing potential.

Recovery can last a lifetime, so long-term care is sometimes needed to prevent relapse.

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Payment for Treatment

We know that it is not easy to afford treatment.

Because drug addiction rehabilitation can be expensive, we provide free insurance verification for every client. Our insurance verification allows you to find out immediately whether your insurance company covers rehab so that you can figure out financing.

Though it is demanding, recovery is possible with the right resources and support networks. Our dedication is to our patients and their recovery.

Though we cannot guarantee that every patient will recover, our focus always rests on providing the patients with knowledge, care, and compassion to ensure the best recovery chance.

Please do not hesitate to reach out to us if you think you or someone you love displays signs of a drug addict or signs of an addictive personality.

We are here to help.

The Amazing Benefits of Yoga for Depression and Anxiety

Depression and anxiety are on the rise in America.

According to the ADAA (Anxiety and Depression Association of America), 40 million people struggle with an anxiety disorder, and 16.1 million experience major depressive disorder every year.

They’re also common in dual diagnosis.

These are scary numbers.

Anyone with the misfortune of having one of these conditions knows how debilitating they can be.

The negative physical, social and emotional impacts of substance abuse and mental health disorders can be severe and long-lasting.

Thankfully, both can be treated effectively.

However, traditional approaches, like medication and psychotherapy, are far from foolproof.

For instance, medication (if it works in the first place) can lead to all manner of side effects. And therapy can last a long time, costing a lot of money in the process.

As a result, alternative approaches are in high demand.

One such alternative treatment that’s becoming increasingly popular is yoga.

13 million people practice yoga in the U.S. every year, and 58% of them practice it to support their health and well-being.

Keep reading to discover the many amazing benefits of yoga for depression and anxiety.

What Actually Is Yoga?

Some describe yoga as a literal union between yourself and your unconscious. But in practice, it’s a form of physical exercise that combines stretching, breathing, and different body poses.

There are different types of yoga, too.

There’s Hatha, Vinyasa, Ashtanga, Iyengar, and Bikram – among others.

While there are similarities between them all, each offers slight variations in intensity, approach, focus, and speed.

For thousands of years, yoga has been used to enhance spiritual, mental, and physical well-being.

However, only recently has research looked into its specific effects on depression and anxiety.

Of all the different forms, Hatha yoga has been studied the most in relation to its impact on these mental illnesses.

Hatha yoga helps you enter deep states of relaxation by focusing on slow, gentle movements and breathing exercises.

It’s ideal for beginners and could be an excellent place to start if you’re new to the practice.

The Amazing Benefits of Yoga for Depression and Anxiety Pathfinders - A group of individuals in recovery are taking part in a yoga class as yoga for depression and anxiety has been found to be beneficial in terms of healthy coping mechanisms to avoid relapse.

The Benefits of Yoga for Depression and Anxiety

Scientific studies have begun to prove the benefits of yoga for depression and anxiety.

Below are some of the ways it’s been shown to help:

Yoga Equals Exercise

Yoga can be a tough physical exercise, especially when you first start.

You’ll be twisting, contorting, using small muscle groups, and generally building strength in many different areas of your body.

Potential pain and discomfort aside, research has shown how this can help the way you feel. For instance, a study by Duke University in 2000 showed an inverse relationship between exercise and depression.

The more we exercise, the less depressed we feel.

Exercise was shown to be as effective as medication at reducing symptoms of depression. Participants who exercised throughout the study experienced a greater reduction in symptoms compared to people who took medication.

Building exercise (such as yoga) into your routine is beneficial to naturally improve periods of depression and anxiety.

Yoga Equals Meditation

Mindful meditation is a practice of non-judgmental awareness in the present moment.

It’s also a recognized clinical treatment for anxiety and depression.

Yoga involves deep, controlled breathing and a focus on the present moment.

Together, these act to produce a mindful state.

How does it help? Well, things often feel overwhelming when you’re anxious and depressed. Your thoughts and emotions may feel out of control, or you may feel nothing at all. Yoga helps by giving you something to focus on.

Whether it’s a mantra, your breathing, or body posture, it grounds you in the present moment and pulls your thoughts back under control. It also makes you more self-aware in the process.

Yoga enables you to see and experience the way you feel.

Over time, you become more self-aware in general, even outside of your yoga practice. Being self-aware like this helps you spot potential problems and find ways to prevent relapse from occurring.

Yoga Impacts Your Brain

Yoga impacts brain chemistry too.

We’ve seen how exercise is great for depression and anxiety.

It works because it’s a natural way of producing chemicals called serotonin and endorphins in our brain. Low serotonin levels play a big role in depression and anxiety.

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are common medication types that help raise the amounts of serotonin in our system. This decreases the symptoms of anxiety and depression as a result.

Yoga helps to modulate the levels of these chemicals in precisely the same way.

Yoga Lowers Stress Levels

Stress is a big component of depression and anxiety.

It’s hard to feel positive emotions when you’re stressed.

Thankfully, yoga helps to reduce stress levels, as well.

One way it does so is by increasing the production of Galanin, which is a neurochemical that reduces the brain/body response to stress.

Interestingly, studies also suggest a link between yoga, stress, and pain. Essentially, the more susceptible you are to stress, the less tolerant you are of pain.

This Harvard article discusses research where yoga teachers had the highest tolerance to pain and the lowest activity in areas of the brain that respond to stress.

If yoga develops our tolerance to stress and pain, then it may also build resilience against depression and anxiety.

Yoga and Physiology

The emotional aspect of depression and anxiety is often linked with a physiological reaction, too.

For instance, anxiety tends to involve an increased heart rate and sweaty palms. Yoga helps decrease this physiological arousal. Your heart rate goes down, your blood pressure lowers, and your breathing slows.

It is also said to increase our heart rate variability (HRV).

HRV is the time difference between our heartbeats. It’s thought that a higher HRV makes it easier to self-monitor and adapt to stressful situations. The higher your HRV, the more emotionally resilient you’re meant to be.

Yoga and Sleep

Some types of yoga positions, such as the ‘corpse pose’, are also known to help with sleep issues.

Sleep problems are often linked with various mental health disorders, including depression and anxiety.

It’s a vicious circle.

The more tired you are, the more susceptible you are to depression and anxiety. And the more depressed and/or anxious you are, the harder it is to sleep.

Yoga and Community

A final benefit of yoga for depression and anxiety is the community aspect that can come with it.

This is an indirect bonus of yoga, but important nonetheless. After all, these mental health disorders can make you feel exceptionally lonely.

Though yoga can be done alone, group yoga is also popular and provides social interaction that’s beneficial in improving one’s mental well-being.

Yoga helps foster a sense of belonging by coming together as a group, doing the same thing, struggling over the same poses, and bonding via a shared attempt to become physically and mentally healthier.

The Amazing Benefits of Yoga for Depression and Anxiety Pathfinders - A group of individuals in recovery are practicing yoga for depression and anxiety, as well as meditation techniques from a professional yoga instructor to help with implementing healthy coping mechanisms, avoid relapse, and build a support system with the individuals in the yoga class.

The Best Yoga Poses for Anxiety and Depression

The below yoga poses are some of the poses that are meant to alleviate anxiety and depression:

The Corpse

We already know that this one helps with sleep. It also lowers your blood pressure, gets rid of headaches, and reduces fatigue.

Simply lay on your back, play dead, and breathe deeply.

Child’s Pose

Here’s another nice and easy one that has many of the same effects.

Get into the same position on your hands and knees, like a child about to start crawling. Next, sit on your heels and drop your stomach between your knees, with your hands extending far out in front of you.

Legs Up the Wall

Lay on your back, place your bum against the wall, and extend your legs upwards.

Lie there with your palms up and on the floor, to your side, for 30 seconds or so.

It’s surprisingly relaxing and helps calm your breathing and lower your blood pressure.

Important Considerations for Yoga, Depression, and Anxiety

As we’ve seen, yoga can have fantastic benefits for depression and anxiety.

However, there are certain things to consider.

For instance, it might be less suited for people with lower levels of flexibility.

It is likely to be more challenging as a beginner, and the poses can sometimes be uncomfortable initially. There’s also a risk of injury, too.

Equally, taking classes can get expensive. It might be harder for people with less expendable income to engage with.

Check with your local group or health center to see how much classes would cost.

Finally, people receiving support for depression and/or anxiety shouldn’t just drop their medication or therapeutic support.

Yoga is only recommended as a complementary approach to current treatments.

Always consult with a medical professional before changing your treatment program.

Time to Wrap Up

Anxiety and depression are debilitating mental illnesses.

Thankfully, they can be effectively treated.

Yoga treatment is one particular alternative treatment that can have significant positive effects on the way you feel.

As we’ve seen, there are many benefits of yoga for depression and anxiety.

The exercises help stimulate chemicals that improve our moods.

Its meditative nature focuses us in the present moment, enhances our self-awareness, reduces physical arousal, and helps us sleep.

It supports our response to stress and provides a sense of community that allows us to interact with others.

We hope you experience the immense benefits that yoga can bring if you decide to give it a go.

For more information on alternative treatment options, contact one of our addiction specialists today.

 

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals Pathfinders Recovery Center - A young woman is taking a Xanax pill because she is starting to experience withdrawals from Xanax.

About Withdrawals from Xanax

Withdrawals from Xanax occur when a person has an addiction to Xanax, a type of benzodiazepine (commonly known as ‘benzos’).

Patients are typically prescribed benzos to treat anxiety or mental health disorders where it acts as a calming agent.

Though addiction to benzos is not as common as addiction to other substances, like opioids and alcohol, addiction can still easily form.

Addiction to benzos is especially prevalent among people who suffer or have suffered from one addiction to a certain substance to another addiction to a different substance.

If you think you are suffering from addiction to Xanax or withdrawal from benzos, we are here to help.

Alprazolam, conversationally known as Xanax, is one of the most commonly prescribed benzos on the market.

Physicians prescribe Xanax to treat anxiety and panic disorders in their patients.

Its main effect is decreasing excessive excitement in the brain, according to MedlinePlus. It is also sometimes prescribed to treat depression.

For people struggling with anxiety, panic disorders, or depression, Xanax has the ability to changes lives for the better.

However, like with the use of any drug, overdose and addiction are both possible.

Addiction to Xanax occurs when a person increases the dose they need overtime to feel an effect.

Their body becomes dependent on the drug and needs it to function.

An overdose occurs when the dosage of Xanax taken is way too high.

An overdose of Xanax can be life-threatening.

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals Pathfinders Recovery Center - An individual is having an initial consultation with an addiction counselor to determine the right path of treatment after experiencing severe Xanax withdrawals.

Understanding Common Symptoms of Withdrawals from Xanax

When someone becomes addicted to Xanax, the body experiences withdrawal symptoms if you suddenly stop.

As Xanax is a prescription drug taken for years at a time, it has both short and long-term withdrawal symptoms.

Xanax withdrawal symptoms, according to the National Library of Medicine, include:

Short-Term:

  • Insomnia
  • Symptoms of anxiety or panic
  • Irritability
  • Hand tremor
  • Sweating
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Weight loss
  • Palpitations
  • Headache
  • Muscular pain and symptoms

Long-term withdrawal symptoms from benzos occur when symptoms last beyond the acute withdrawal period, which is also known as a “protracted withdrawal.”

Symptoms include prolonged depression, anxiety, and insomnia.

It is crucial to recognize that even prescription drugs often become addictive.

Though Xanax is beneficial for some people and can change lives for the better, doctors and patients should carefully control them.

People with a history of addiction are at much greater risk for developing an addiction to Xanax.

Make sure to inform your doctor about your medical history before the prescription of Xanax.

Your doctor may prescribe a special dosage regimen in conjunction with your daily life and habits to help better control the effectiveness of the drug without causing adverse effects.

It is essential to consider your doctor’s evaluation on the treatment he prescribes for you.

Immediate Placement in Xanax Rehab or Other Forms of Benzodiazepine Rehab – Get Help Now

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Effects and Abuse of Xanax

Xanax is a common prescription drug, meaning it is less addictive than other drugs found on the illegal market. However, if used for a prolonged period, the body may form a psychological or physical dependence on Xanax.

Increased tolerance for benzos also commonly leads to addiction. Over time, the body needs more of the substance to produce a calming effect, causing patients to take higher doses. These higher doses are what lead to the body’s dependence.

Though addiction is possible, Xanax abuse is much more common than an addiction to it. People who abuse Xanax are likely to be using another substance as well, such as opioids or alcohol.

The American Family Physician states that an estimated 80% of benzos abuse happens in conjunction with the use of another drug (commonly opioids). The use of benzos is typically regular for abusers of opioids and meth. Some patients report combining alcohol with benzos to achieve their desired effect.

It is significant to note that Xanax is not for people to use in conjunction with other drugs and substances.

High dosages of Xanax or other types of benzos cause dependence over time. When use stops rapidly, intense Xanax withdrawal symptoms occur. Long-term use leads to a compulsive psychological need for the drug, causing loss of confidence and anxiety symptoms when patients stop using.

Learn More About Rehab for Benzos at Pathfinders: Call Today

866-263-1847

 

Mental Illness and Withdrawals from Xanax

Because Xanax most commonly treats mental illnesses, such as anxiety, panic disorder, and even depression, people with mental illnesses are much more susceptible to addiction and withdrawals from Xanax.

People with mental illness are at a higher risk for drug misuse and addiction. Drugs and mental illness sometimes affect the same parts of the brain, and people experiencing mental illness often take drugs to deal with their condition’s difficulties.

Xanax prescription and use require a tricky balance. Why? People with anxiety and panic disorders are statistically more likely to develop addictions, but Xanax is most effective in treating this disorder. Because of this, Xanax is prescribed only by physicians who take careful notes about patient history to ascertain safe dosage amounts and avoid dependency.

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of individuals in residential rehab for Xanax withdrawals is attending a group therapy session led by an addiction specialist to learn how to live a Xanax-free lifestyle.

Treatment of Withdrawals from Xanax

Like many other addictive drugs, treatment for Xanax withdrawal symptoms is available at rehabilitation centers, like Pathfinders Recovery Center.

At reputable treatment centers, patients receive medication to help ease Xanax withdrawals, while also providing treatment plans and behavioral therapy. Attendance of support groups also helps patients establish a sense of community as they know others who also struggle with addiction.

According to research from the NCBI, for patients with an established addiction or dependency, it is useful to switch to a long-acting benzodiazepine and continue reducing the dosage until none remains. This process helps avoid severe withdrawal symptoms, like seizures. Drug and alcohol rehab centers offer multiple types of treatment, including safer substitution medication and psychotherapies.

Our main goal is always to supply patients with the resources they need to recover from addiction and overcome Xanax withdrawal symptoms at our treatment centers.

Though we cannot guarantee recovery, choosing to attend rehab at one of our facilities gives you a fighting chance for a better life. We offer each person unique treatments, getting to know our patients to determine which type of treatment fits best. At our treatment centers, you have the chance to meet others with similar experiences and establish a feeling of camaraderie. With treatment, recovery is attainable.

Free Insurance Verification for Xanax Rehab – Get Help Now

855-728-4363

 

Payment for Treatment

We understand paying for treatment for withdrawal from Xanax adds more stress to addiction pressures and difficulties.

Because of this challenge, we offer free insurance verification to know where you stand with financing treatment.

We want to make this burdensome process as smooth as possible for you.

If you are struggling with an addiction to benzos or Xanax, you have come to the right place.

We established our treatment program to help people struggling with addictions, and we dedicate ourselves to the cause.

Our network of understanding and experienced staff helps create a positive sense of community with our patients.

Always remember that recovery from your addiction is possible.

Freedom from addiction leads to a better and freer life that is no longer controlled by drugs.

Recovery is complicated and is not an assurance, but it is worth every challenge required to get there when achieved.

Reach out to find out more about treatment and how to begin your recovery journey.

Let us help you find a happier life.

Hydrocodone Addiction and Abuse

Hydrocodone Addiction and Abuse Pathfinders Recovery Center - A bottle of hydrocodone medications with pills laying in front of it, which often leads to hydrocodone addiction for many individuals.

What is Hydrocodone Addiction?

For people who are prescribed hydrocodone by their doctor, it could come as a surprise at just how easy it is to develop a hydrocodone addiction.

In fact, it can take just a few weeks to become addicted, especially if you are not taking this medication correctly.

Taking hydrocodone for long periods of time can also lead to hydrocodone addiction. You may start finding it is not working as well to control your pain or you have side effects when you are not taking the medication.

Hydrocodone addiction is a serious health problem across the nation leading to a rise in addictions, overdoses, and even deaths.

Understanding the Hydrocodone Abuse

Hydrocodone is an opioid prescribed to treat severe pain.

Most opioids are made from the opium poppy plant, though some are now made synthetically in labs. These drugs interact with areas in your brain and body called opioid receptors. This helps to relieve pain, and are great options for short-term pain management.

Opioids can have other side effects. They can also create a feeling of relaxation and euphoria. It is these side effects that often lead to hydrocodone abuse.

Hydrocodone abuse is when you take this medication more often than you are supposed to, in higher doses, or if you are taking it without a prescription. Hydrocodone abuse can quickly lead to an addiction, putting you at risk of an overdose and death.

Immediate Placement in Rehab for Hydrocodone Addiction – Get Help Now

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How Hydrocodone Abuse Affects Your Body

Like many types of medications, hydrocodone can cause side effects even when taken appropriately. If you have a problem with hydrocodone abuse, these side effects can be even more noticeable.

These effects can include:

  • Nausea
  • Dry mouth
  • Tiredness, difficulty staying awake, or insomnia
  • Headache
  • Back pain and stiff or sore muscles
  • Problems urinating
  • Swelling in the foot, leg, or ankle
  • Uncontrollable shaking

Long-term hydrocodone abuse can cause even more serious side effects. One of these effects is damage to your bowels. This is because hydrocodone causes constipation. Over time, this effect can cause issues like hemorrhoids.

Another serious side effect of hydrocodone abuse is called hypoxia. This is a condition that happens when opioids slow your breathing too much, and can even make you stop breathing. When this happens, your brain does not get enough oxygen. This can cause brain damage, coma, and even death.

Learn More About Hydrocodone Rehab at Pathfinders: Call Today

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Mental Illness and Hydrocodone Addiction

People who have a history of mental health issues are more likely to have a problem with hydrocodone abuse. This is especially true if you have ever experienced depression or anxiety or have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, panic disorder, or major depressive disorder — to name a few.

Some people try to treat their mental health symptoms by taking hydrocodone to feel more relaxed and happier. In the long run, this drug will actually make your symptoms worse.

If you are struggling with a hydrocodone addiction and mental health issues, it is very important that you receive treatment for both of these issues at a drug rehab facility that specializes in treating a dual diagnosis.

Hydrocodone Addiction and Abuse Pathfinders Recovery Center - An older man struggling with both hydrocodone addiction and a mental illness is speaking with an addition counselor to determine the right treatment for his specific needs,

What is Hydrocodone Withdrawal?

If you have a hydrocodone addiction, this means that your body is used to having it in your system. If you stop taking it, you can experience many different unpleasant symptoms.

These symptoms are called withdrawal. Withdrawal symptoms can begin as soon as a few hours after the last time you took it. When you have a hydrocodone addiction, these symptoms usually come in two parts.

The first part begins within the first day after you stop using. These symptoms can include:

  • Agitation
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Runny nose
  • Sleeplessness
  • Sweating

After another day or two, additional withdrawal symptoms can appear as well.

These are typically more uncomfortable and can include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Dilated pupils
  • Goosebumps
  • Nausea
  • Stomach cramps
  • Vomiting

The worst day of hydrocodone withdrawal is usually the third day. This is when symptoms usually peak before slowly fading. Most people that are going through hydrocodone detox will deal with withdrawals for a few days up to one week.

At Pathfinders Recovery Center, we have the option of a medical detox program. This allows us to help minimize your withdrawal symptoms so that the detox process is more comfortable and easier to get through.

Hydrocodone Addiction and Abuse Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of individuals that are struggling with hydrocodone addiction is discussing healthy ways to avoid relapse and maintain long-term sobriety.

The Risk of Experiencing an Overdose

One of the fastest-growing drug concerns in the United States today is that of opioid overdose.

Hydrocodone carries the same risk of overdose as any other opioid. This happens when someone uses this drug frequently or for an extended period of time. Your body gets used to the dosage of drugs you have been taking, and you have to take more in order to feel pain relief or to get high. As you increase your dosage, you are at a higher risk of accidentally overdosing. Your breathing and heart rate can slow down to dangerous levels, which can cause death.

An average of 100 people dies each day in the United States from an opioid overdose.

Symptoms of overdose may include:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Slowed or stopped breathing
  • Extreme sleepiness
  • Weakness in your muscles
  • Very narrow pupils
  • Cold, clammy skin
  • Passing out or coma

If you or anyone you know is showing signs of an opioid overdose, it is important to call for help immediately.

Without medical attention, a person can quickly die from an opioid overdose. Most paramedics today carry a drug called naloxone, which can be used to reverse an opioid overdose.

It must be administered as soon as possible after overdose symptoms appear in order to be effective.

24-Hour Hydrocodone Addiction Hotline – Get Help Now

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Treatment Options for Hydrocodone Addiction

When it comes to dealing with a hydrocodone addiction, it is important to get help as soon as you realize that you have a problem.

The longer you have a hydrocodone addiction, the higher the risk that you might experience an overdose.

We begin by sitting down with all of our clients in order to figure out which treatment options are going to be right for them.

We currently offer intensive outpatient, partial hospitalization, residential, and long-term drug rehab programs.

Once we have you placed into the right program, we can begin treatment.

The first step is getting you through detox so that all of the drugs are out of your body.

Afterward, we can begin your behavioral treatment with one of our highly-trained therapists.

We find a lot of success with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). CBT allows us to work with you to figure out the reasons behind your hydrocodone addiction, and how your thoughts influence your behaviors.

Then we give you tactics to avoid drug use triggers and to better manage stress. By getting the reasons behind why you have an addiction, we can help you create a plan for a positive recovery.

Free Insurance Verification for Hydrocodone Rehab – Get Help Now

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Seek Help from a Trustworthy Drug Rehab

It does not matter if your hydrocodone addiction began with a doctor’s prescription or with recreational use.

This addiction has serious health consequences, which is why it is so important that you seek help at a drug rehab facility.

At Pathfinders Recovery Center, we know what it takes to get your life back from the adverse effects of addiction.

Our luxury locations provide you with a comfortable and home-like atmosphere so that our clients feel safe and secure throughout their treatment program.

We help ensure your success by using only scientifically researched, cutting edge, and effective drug and alcohol addiction treatment programs.

We have over 25 years of experience in helping people with addictions and co-occurring disorders to overcome their addictions.

Many of our clients wonder whether or not they will be able to take advantage of their health insurance benefits to help cover their treatment. That is why we accept most major insurances through our free insurance verification.

Simply give us a call and one of our addiction specialists can check to see how much of your treatment program will be covered by your insurance before you begin treatment.

You can trust us to communicate with your insurance provider to ensure that you receive every benefit that you are entitled to.

Addiction is a difficult thing to deal with both mentally and physically, but there is no reason you have to try and get clean by yourself. Let us use our years of experience to help you get on the path to a meaningful and lasting recovery.

Contact us today and see the difference we can make by helping you to become healthy once again.

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals Pathfinders Recovery Center - An individual is having an initial consultation with an addiction counselor to determine the right path of treatment after experiencing severe Xanax withdrawals.

About Withdrawals from Xanax

Withdrawals from Xanax occur when a person has an addiction to Xanax, a type of benzodiazepine (commonly known as ‘benzos’).

Patients are typically prescribed benzos to treat anxiety or mental health disorders as a calming agent.

Though addiction to benzos is not as common as addiction to other substances, like opioids and alcohol, addiction is still likely to form.

Addiction to benzos is especially prevalent among people who suffer or have suffered from addiction to another substance.

If you think you are suffering from addiction to Xanax or experiencing Xanax withdrawals, Pathfinders Recovery Center is here to help.

Alprazolam, conversationally known as Xanax, is one of the most commonly prescribed benzos on the market.

Physicians prescribe Xanax to treat anxiety and panic disorders for their patients.

Its main effect is decreasing excessive excitement in the brain, according to MedlinePlus.

It is also sometimes prescribed to treat depression.

For people struggling with anxiety, panic disorders, or depression, Xanax can have the ability to change lives for the better.

As with the use of any drug, however, overdose and addiction are both possible.

Addiction to Xanax occurs when a person increases the dose they need overtime to feel the effects of the substance.

Their body becomes dependent on the drug and needs it to function.

An overdose occurs when the dosage of Xanax taken is way too high.

An overdose of this benzodiazepine can be life-threatening.

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals Pathfinders Recovery Center - An individual is having an initial consultation with an addiction counselor to determine the right path of treatment after experiencing severe Xanax withdrawals.

Understanding Common Symptoms of Withdrawals from Xanax

When someone becomes addicted to Xanax, the body experiences withdrawal symptoms if you suddenly stop taking the medication. As Xanax is a prescription drug taken for years at a time, it has both short and long-term withdrawal symptoms.

Symptoms of Xanax withdrawals, according to the National Library of Medicine, include:

Short-Term:

  • Insomnia
  • Symptoms of anxiety or panic
  • Irritability
  • Hand tremor
  • Sweating
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Weight loss
  • Palpitations
  • Headache
  • Muscular pain and symptoms

Long-term withdrawal symptoms from benzos occur when symptoms last beyond the acute withdrawal period, which is also known as a “protracted withdrawal.” Symptoms include prolonged depression, anxiety, and insomnia.

It is crucial to recognize that even prescription drugs often become addictive. Though Xanax is beneficial for some people and can change lives for the better, doctors and patients should carefully monitor these prescriptions and patients. People with a history of addiction are at a much greater risk for developing an addiction to Xanax.

Make sure to inform your doctor about your medical history before any prescription is made. Your doctor may prescribe a special dosage regimen in conjunction with your daily life and habits to better control the effectiveness of the drug, without causing adverse effects. It is essential to consider your doctor’s evaluation of the treatment that has been set for you.

Immediate Placement in Rehab for Xanax Withdrawals – Get Help Now

855-728-4363

 

Effects and Abuse of Xanax

Xanax is a common prescription drug, meaning it is less addictive than other drugs found on the illegal market.

However, if used for a prolonged period, the body may form a psychological or physical dependence on Xanax. Increased tolerance for benzos also commonly leads to addiction. Over time, the body needs more of the substance to produce a calming effect, causing patients to take higher doses. These higher doses are what lead to the body’s dependence.

Though addiction is possible, abuse of Xanax is much more common than forming an addiction to it. People who abuse Xanax are likely to be using another substance as well, such as opioids or alcohol. The American Family Physician states that an estimated 80% of benzo abuse happens in conjunction with the use of another drug (commonly opioids).

The use of benzos is also regular for abusers of opioids and meth. Some patients report combining alcohol with benzos to achieve the desired effect. It is important to note that Xanax is not for people to use in conjunction with other drugs and substances.

High dosages of Xanax or other types of benzos can cause dependence over time. When use stops rapidly, intense Xanax withdrawal symptoms occur. Long-term use leads to a compulsive psychological need for the drug, causing loss of confidence and anxiety symptoms when patients stop using.

Learn More About Xanax Rehab at Pathfinders – Call Today

866-263-1847

 

Mental Illness and Withdrawals from Xanax

Because Xanax most commonly treats mental illnesses such as anxiety, panic disorder, and even depression, people with mental illnesses are much more susceptible to addiction and Xanax withdrawals.

Drugs and mental illness sometimes affect the same parts of the brain, and people experiencing mental illness often take drugs to deal with their condition’s difficulties.

Xanax prescription and use require a tricky balance. People with anxiety and panic disorders are statistically more likely to develop an addiction, but Xanax is most effective in treating this disorder.

Because of this, Xanax is only prescribed by physicians who take careful notes about patient history to ensure safe dosage amounts are prescribed and substance dependency is avoided.

24-Hour Xanax Withdrawals Rehab Hotline – Get Help Now

855-728-4363

 

Treatment of Withdrawals from Xanax

Like many other addictive drugs, treatment for Xanax withdrawal symptoms is available at rehabilitation centers, like the ones offered by Pathfinders Recovery Center.

At addiction treatment centers, patients receive medication to help with withdrawal and addiction, in addition to therapy and counseling. Attendance of support groups also helps patients establish a sense of community as they know others who struggle with addiction too.

According to research from the NCBI, for patients with an established addiction or dependency, it is helpful to switch to a long-acting benzodiazepine and continue reducing the dosage until one can safely taper off the medication. This process helps avoid severe withdrawal symptoms, like seizures.

Rehabilitation centers offer multiple types of treatment, including safer substitution medication and psychotherapies.

Our main goal is always to supply patients with the resources they need to recover from addiction and overcome Xanax withdrawal symptoms. Though we cannot guarantee recovery, choosing to attend rehab at one of our facilities gives you a fighting chance for a better life.

We offer each person unique treatments to get to know our patients in order to ascertain which type of treatment fits best.

At our treatment centers, you have the chance to meet others with similar experiences with addiction and establish a feeling of camaraderie. With treatment, recovery is attainable.

Common Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawals Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of individuals in residential rehab for Xanax withdrawals is attending a group therapy session led by an addiction specialist to learn how to live a Xanax-free lifestyle.

Free Insurance Verification for Xanax Rehab – Get Help Now

855-728-4363

 

Payment for Treatment

We understand that paying for treatment for withdrawal from benzos adds more stress to addiction pressures and difficulties.

Because of this challenge, we offer free insurance verification to know where you stand with financing treatment.

We want to make this burdensome process as smooth as possible for you.

If you are struggling with an addiction to benzos or Xanax, you have come to the right place.

We established our treatment program to help people struggling with addictions, and we dedicate ourselves to the cause.

Our network of understanding and experienced staff helps create a positive sense of community with our patients.

Always remember that recovery from your addiction is possible.

Freedom from addiction leads to a better and freer life that is no longer controlled by drugs.

Recovery is complicated and is not an assurance, but it is worth every challenge required to get there when achieved.

Reach out to find out more about treatment and how to begin your recovery journey.

Let us help you find a happier life.

What Are Psychological Addictions?

What Are Psychological Addictions? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A young man is meeting with an addiction counselor to go over what psychological addictions are.

About Psychological Addictions

When people think of addictions, what usually comes to mind are addictive substances that predominantly affect the human body.

While most habits primarily affect the body, psychological addictions occur in the brain.

Psychological dependence involves becoming mentally fixated upon a substance or activity.

Such addictions can overrule your life and cause you to behave in a way that is not recognized by your loved ones.

It causes strong feelings or compulsions in the mind, making the addict feel as if they cannot go without the substance when, in reality, their body does not need it.

Dependency affects thought processes, making it difficult for people who are addicted to thinking about anything else.

Psychological addictions are sometimes more challenging to diagnose and address than physical addictions because they are not obvious.

While physical addictions cause outwardly visible symptoms of withdrawal, psychological addictions happen almost entirely within the mind.

There is less research and knowledge of psychological addictions because they are not as obvious.

What Are Psychological Addictions? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of individuals is attending a group therapy session led by an addiction specialist to go over what psychological addictions are.

Understanding Psychological Addictions

While the term “psychological addiction” is common, psychological dependencies are not strictly addictions. The traditional definition of the word “addiction” involves substance abuse that affects the body. However, the term has widened to include other compulsive behaviors such as gambling and non-physically addictive substances.

There is debate over some forms of psychological addictions, such as those caused by drugs not traditionally seen as addictive. Some scientists perceive marijuana addiction as psychological, while others argue it is a physical addiction.

Most users reporting addiction to marijuana, according to Indiana University, report a psychological dependency. Another drug that can cause psychological dependence is LSD, commonly referred to as “acid.” Though different from physical addictions caused by other substances like opioids and alcohol, psychological habits are still harmful.

Behavioral addictions are another type of psychological dependency. Addictions are often known as only involving substances, but they can and do affect various behaviors.

According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), many behavioral scientists believe that anything capable of stimulating someone also has addictive capabilities.

Addiction develops when a former habit becomes a compulsion. Activities susceptible to forming behavioral addictions include surfing the internet, gambling, playing video games, and watching videos or television. Psychological addictions occur behaviorally as well as with substance abuse.

It is crucial to remember that while psychological and physical addictions are two different things, changed mental processes occur both. The psychology of addictions is complex and still being studied.

Both physical and psychological dependence affect some brain processes, making addicts feel they cannot go without the drug. In physical addictions, the body experiences symptoms as well as the mind.

Physical and psychological addiction can occur together. When physical addiction occurs, it is very likely for the patient to have formed some mental dependency. Even if you no longer enjoy the substance, both your brain and body compulsively desire it.

While mental addiction sometimes occurs without physical addiction, it is less common for someone to be physically but not mentally addicted. When physical and psychological addiction occurs together, recovery becomes even more challenging to achieve.

Patients should receive treatment from both doctors and therapists in this case. Combining therapy, support groups, and medication is a common and effective treatment method for combined psychological and physical addictions.

Immediate Placement for Psychological Addictions – Get Help Now

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Effects and Abuse of Psychologically Addictive Substances

Continual use of psychologically addictive substances is harmful to the life of the addict. The body does not experience changes physically, but changes in behavior make life difficult. Physical symptoms in the body do not occur during a psychological dependency, but behavioral symptoms do. They include:

  • Compulsively feeling as though the person needs the drug or activity
  • Lack of interest in activities the person formerly enjoyed
  • Changed behavior toward work, school, family, or friends
  • Changes in mood

Learn More About Psychological Addictions at Pathfinders – Call Today

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Mental Illness and Psychological Addictions

If a mental illness is present in a person, addictions are much more likely to form. The term ‘dual diagnosis’ by MedlinePlus plays a role in the causation of substance abuse and mental health issues.

Psychological addiction is sometimes categorized as a form of mental health issue as it deals with compulsions and a perceived need for the substance or activity. If mental illness and psychological addiction are present, treatment is necessary for both conditions.

24-Hour Psychological Addictions Rehab Hotline – Get Help Now

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Treatment of Psychological Addictions

Treatment for psychological addiction is sometimes similar to the treatment of physical addiction. Counseling offered focuses on overcoming compulsions caused by mental dependency. Patients learn behavioral therapy and coping mechanisms such as CBT and how to deal with compulsions.

Psychologists often treat mental dependence by focusing on what caused the addiction in the first place. Sometimes, childhood trauma or repeated patterns can be a conversational aspect of the process. When patients can understand why they turned to the substance or behavior in the first place, recovery becomes much more attainable. This process allows patients to work on the deep-rooted issues causing their dependency.

Therapists and doctors at our recommended rehabilitation centers are knowledgeable, compassionate, and present with their patients. The psychology of addictions is a complicated and changing field still studied, but our staff is up-to-date and dedicated to helping you recover.

Though we wish we could guarantee recovery completely, this is never possible. Relapse is undoubtedly a common and prevalent issue, but it is imperative to know that it is sometimes part of the process. Relapse in a mental dependency does not mean you have failed. It merely means you need continued work on the mental issue.

What Are Psychological Addictions? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A young man is meeting with an addiction counselor to go over what psychological addictions are.

 

Free Insurance Verification for Psychological Addictions Rehab – Get Help Now

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Payment for Treatment

Treatment for psychological dependencies sometimes falls under insurance coverage, but this is not a guarantee.

We offer free insurance verification to help you find out quickly about payment for treatment.

We understand that figuring out how to pay for therapy or counseling is burdensome and difficult.

Both behavioral and substance addictions cost significant amounts of money to maintain.

Gambling and drugs are examples of incredibly addictive behaviors that create a financial burden.

Addictions often cause difficulty in paying for the rehabilitation or therapy that you desperately need.

Our greatest goal always remains to supply you with the assets you need for recovery.

Please do not fear to reach out to us to discuss insurance verification or payment for rehabilitation services.

Psychological addictions differ from physical addictions in that no physical symptoms occur.

Though the body is not affected by mental dependencies, they are still capable of causing emotional and behavioral difficulties.

Thousands of Americans suffer from psychological dependence on a substance or behavior.

It is important to remember that you are not alone, and that recovery from your addiction is possible.

Emotional distress caused by a mental dependency is real and has the capability of disrupting your life.

Recovery is a long and challenging journey.

We know that obstacles like relapse and financial difficulty cause recovery to feel distant and sometimes even impossible.

These are real risks associated with rehabilitation, but the only way of knowing whether recovery is possible is to try.

Your addiction does not have to continue.

You are capable of the work needed to achieve a peaceful and addiction-free life.

Contact us to learn more about psychological addiction and to begin your recovery today. We are here for you.

What Are Common Signs Of Someone Struggling with Drug Abuse?

About the Signs of a Drug Addict

Information about the signs of a drug addict is critical due to its prevalence in America.

Addiction to drugs is an epidemic that kills thousands of people every year.

Drug addiction transforms and hurts people’s lives all over the globe.

If you think someone you know may be susceptible to drug use or addiction, you must become educated about the signs, symptoms, and treatments for drug addiction.

Though addiction to drugs is hurtful and demanding to maintain, recovery is even more difficult.

Drug addiction changes the brain’s pathways, causing a dependency in the body and compulsive use of the substance.

Even when addiction is hurting them and those they love, someone struggling with an addiction to drugs feels like they have no choice but to continue use.

Learning and memorizing the signs of an addict or the signs of an addictive personality is essential to prevention and recovery.

Having this knowledge allows you to keep an eye out for those you love who you believe may be vulnerable to drug addiction.

MedlinePlus lists the following as signs of a drug addict:

  • Changes in appetite
  • Loss of interest in favorite things
  • Spending a lot of time alone
  • Not practicing self-care
  • Quick changes in mood
  • Being very tired and sad
  • Changing friends more than usual
  • Having a lot of energy, chattering
  • Having issues in work or school
  • Having issues with family or friends

What Are Common Signs Of Someone Struggling with Drug Abuse? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A young man is sitting with an addiction specialist for an initial consultation to determine if he has the signs of a drug addict and if he requires treatment.

Understanding the Signs of a Drug Addict

Knowledge of the signs of a drug addict is constructive, but it is crucial to know the next steps and how addiction occurs if you believe someone you love is suffering from addiction.

Drug addiction can develop both quickly over a short period of time or a slow period of time.

When a person begins using drugs, the effect on the body is intense and sometimes euphoric. Over time, if a person continues usage, the body needs more and more of the substance to produce a high. Addiction forms when the body is dependent on the substance and usage is no longer voluntary. Drug use turns compulsive, and those struggling feel as if they need the substance to survive.

If that person discontinues the use of the drug, the body experiences intense withdrawal symptoms.

Certain people are more susceptible to drug addiction. This information helps prevent drug use and addiction because concerned family members can implement positive drug-avoidance strategies.

MedlinePlus lists the following as risks for drug addiction:

  • Individual Biology:
    • Some people are less likely to enjoy drug use. If someone tries drugs once and hates them, they are much less likely to form an addiction. Addiction is more common in people who enjoy drug use.
  • Mental Health Issues
  • Trouble at Home
    • Children, adults, and teens who have a difficult home life are more likely to develop a drug addiction.
  • Trouble at school, work, or socializing
  • Spending time with people who use drugs
  • Starting drug use at a young age

If you noticed these symptoms in a friend or a family member, speak to someone responsible and knowledgeable about these concerns. Preventative measures or early interventions help stop addiction from forming.

After addiction forms, it is incredibly challenging to recover from. If you believe you may help someone prevent addiction, acting sooner, rather than later, could save a life.

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Effects and Abuse of Drugs

Though it is best to prevent addiction early on, this is not always a possibility. Sometimes, the forming of habit is not an easy thing to see. By the time family members or friends spot the signs of an addict, addiction is already present.

Addiction causes both short and long-term effects on the body and mind. Familiarizing yourself with these effects allows you to help secure treatment for the person you think may struggle with addiction.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) lists the long and short-term risks of drug addiction as follows:

Short-Term Risks:

  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Overdose
  • Changes in sleep patterns, mood, heart rate, and appetite

Long-Term Risks:

  • Heart or lung disease
  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis
  • Mental illness

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Mental Illness and Drug Abuse

Drug abuse and mental illness commonly occur together in the same patient. Drug addiction often leads to mental illness and vice-versa. They are sometimes direct causes of one another, or they can develop together. They may occur together because they affect the same parts of the brain, according to the NIDA. It is also possible for people to turn to drugs because their mental disorder has made them feel upset, anxious, or distracted. Because of these factors, mental illnesses are sometimes signs of an addictive personality.

If mental illness and drug addiction occur together, patients must receive treatment for both issues. The presence of mental illness makes a recovery from drug addiction more difficult if not adequately addressed and treated. It is possible to overcome both mental health issues and drug addiction through treatment.

Common mental health issues to watch out for include:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • ADHD
  • Bipolar disorder

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Treatment for the Signs of a Drug Addict

People who display the signs of an addict receive treatment from the expert staff at hospitals or rehabilitation centers. Treating drug addictions is in no way simple; relapse is common, and the body’s compulsive need for the drug makes maintenance of recovery extremely challenging.

Though relapse often occurs and makes recovery much more difficult, it does not mean that treatment has not helped. Recovery is still possible even after multiple relapses.

According to the NIDA, there are three main goals of addiction treatment:

    • Stopping drug use
    • Maintaining a drug-free life
    • Becoming or continuing to be a productive member of society

Treatment is adjusted to fit what works best for each patient, so it involves trial and error. Common treatments for the signs of a drug addict include medication, participation in support groups, counseling to diagnose mental health issues, and therapy.

In therapy, patients focus on understanding the reasons they became addicted to drugs in the first place. Therapy also teaches patients how to remain drug-free and avoid relapse.

Support groups provide patients with an essential sense of camaraderie. Being surrounded by understanding people who have experienced similar things has excellent healing potential. Recovery can last a lifetime, so long-term care is sometimes needed to prevent relapse.

What Are Common Signs Of Someone Struggling with Drug Abuse? Pathfinders Recovery Center - A group of individuals in inpatient rehab that showed signs of a drug addict and decided to enter treatment is discussing experiences in their lives, healthy coping mechanisms, and supportive advice for one another as they work toward recovery and long-term sobriety.

 

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Payment for Treatment

We know that it is not at all easy to pay for treatment.

Because drug addiction rehabilitation can be expensive, we offer free insurance verification for every client.

Our insurance verification allows you to find out immediately whether your insurance company covers rehab so that you can figure out financing.

Though it is demanding, recovery is possible with the right resources and support networks.

Our dedication is to our patients and their recovery.

Though we cannot guarantee that every patient will recover, our focus always rests on providing the patients with knowledge, care, and compassion to ensure the best recovery chance.

Please do not hesitate to reach out to us if you think you or someone you love displays signs of a drug addict or signs of an addictive personality. We are here to help.

Faith-Based Addiction Treatment

Faith-Based Addiction Treatment

Many people struggle with fighting addiction, but it can be easier to fight your addiction through faith-based addiction treatment.

If you are religious, there are unique aspects of recovery that you do not realize.

Abusing drugs and alcohol can affect your faith and religion.

Because 76.5% of Americans identified as religious in 2015, faith-based addiction treatment is a suitable option.

Whether or not you are religious, drug addiction often feels like a moral or ethical failing.

By going to faith-based addiction treatment, you can connect with your high power to overcome addiction.

Faith-based addiction treatment and rehab will allow your religious beliefs to grow during treatment, making you a stronger person.

Faith-Based Addiction Treatment Pathfinders - Photo showing the laps of 3 people who are in a faith based addiction treatment program as they read from their bibles.

What is Faith-Based Addiction Treatment?

Faith-based addiction treatment addresses your medical and spiritual needs.

Even though the spiritual aspect is a large focus, treatment still needs to contain standard drug rehab techniques.

These techniques might include medically-assisted detox and behavioral therapy.

Healing the soul and managing withdrawal symptoms and cravings are equally important.

Standard addiction treatments in faith-based rehab might include:

  • Drug detox
  • Individual therapy
  • Group therapy
  • Prescribed medication for withdrawal symptoms
  • Life skills and emotional coping training

In faith-based addiction treatment, certified spiritual advisors are present for all counseling.

They offer guidance during your treatment, along with individual and group sessions.

These counselors help you find peace by way of faith.

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Narcotics Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous

You may have heard of the support groups NA and AA. These acronyms stand for narcotics anonymous and alcoholics anonymous. These support groups are faith-based addiction treatment, as they incorporate faith into their aftercare programs.

Often after you have completed rehab, you join either AA or NA. The emotional support that you find during group meetings is beneficial to staying sober once you are in the world again. Speaking with peers who have been through the same situation will help in avoiding relapse.

 

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Faith-Based Addiction Treatment vs. Standard Treatment

The difference between faith-based addiction treatment and standard treatment is the addition of faith and faith-based activities.

In faith-based addiction treatment, you will see that worship is a part of your recovery plan. Spaces for prayer are available on-site, and there are typically religious services. Often scripture readings, discussions, and meditations occur daily.

In one study, for people interested in religion, a faith-based activity could be helpful in treatment. Combining a supervised detox and mental health counseling with faith-based addiction treatment can be extremely effective. Not only are the physical and medical aspects being taken care of, but the mental and spiritual aspects are too.

More than 800 faith-based community programs receive SAMHSA grants to help those of faith beat their addictions.

Who is a Candidate for Faith-Based Addiction Treatment?

You are a good candidate for faith-based addiction treatment if you have a specific faith and want to incorporate faith in treatment.

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Examples of Faith-Based Addiction Treatment Curriculum

  • The Struggle of Sin: In this, you will understand sin and view your addiction as such. You gain a better understanding of your disease.
  • The Grace of God: If your faith involves God, then you will be able to use scripture to understand God’s grace. It will also allow you to learn how to free yourself from addiction.
  • Empowerment of Faith: This can be a special subject. When you read scripture, you articulate what faith means to you and how it empowers you.
  • The Importance of Honesty: The first step in recovery is honesty with yourself. You will need to admit to yourself that you have an addiction. Understand your addiction and apply biblical teachings.
  • Prayer and meditation: Because these are both essential to spirituality, you will learn how to pray and meditate to aid your recovery process.

Faith-Based Addiction Treatment Pathfinders - The hands of a group of people who are in prayer during their faith based addiction treatment.

Signs You Have an Addiction

There are many different signs of addiction. Although it may be hard to admit it to yourself, this is the first step in the recovery process. Here are signs that you have an addiction:

  • You keep taking prescription drugs after you no longer need them.
  • You have developed a tolerance to the drug and need more to get the same effect.
  • You feel bad when you no longer have the drug in your system. You may feel depressed or nauseous, get headaches, or sweat excessively. Often these symptoms can lead to seizures if not controlled.
  • When you cannot stop yourself from using the drug, even though you want to, you may have quit many times but are still using.
  • Addiction is affecting your social relationships, as well as your mental or physical health.
  • You think about how to get more of the drug. You feel bad after taking the drug.
  • You struggle with limiting how much you take of the drug. You may say that you will only use it so often, but you are using it more than planned.
  • You have lost interest in things you once loved to do, such as spending time with family or friends.
  • You are no longer able to perform daily tasks that were previously in your routine.
  • You drive or operate machinery while intoxicated.
  • You have needed to borrow or steal money to pay for your addiction.
  • You do not let others know about your drug use, and you feel embarrassed by your use.
  • You are having trouble getting along with your family, friends, or coworkers. The people in your life are complaining that you act differently or have changed due to your use.
  • You are encountering insomnia or oversleeping disorders. Your sleeping and eating habits have changed.
  • You have specific friends with who you typically use drugs or drink alcohol. You go to different places than normal to use or drink.
  • You have gone “doctor shopping” to obtain prescriptions for the same drug from different doctors.
  • Often look in your friend’s or family’s medicine cabinets to find drugs.
  • You take prescribed medication with alcohol or other drugs to increase their effects.

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Is It Time for You to Get Help for Your Addiction?

If you are someone of faith and want help with your addiction, consider faith-based addiction treatment.

At Pathfinders, we offer inpatient and outpatient faith-based treatment programs.

Regardless of your religion, you can find a program that shares your faith and meets your spiritual needs.

We also offer free insurance verification for treatment to help you in finding the right program.

Contact us today for more information.