Binge Drinking by College Students: The Risks

A young man drinking a large mug of beer, looking sad, to illustrate the dangers of binge drinking by college students

Unfortunately, binge drinking by college students is relatively common, and comes with a host of worrying side effects for mental health.

According to the National Institutes of Health, a 2018 study found that 37% of college students had engaged in binge drinking within the previous month.

The National Institutes of Health also reports that binge drinking among college students is linked to suicide attempts.

A study in the Journal of American College Health found that students who engaged in heavy drinking were more likely to experience poor mental health.

Given the high prevalence of binge drinking among college students, some students may require rehab in order to stop drinking and avoid the poor mental health and suicide risk that can come with heavy alcohol use.

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Consequences of Binge Drinking Among College Students

Beyond the risk of suicide and mental health problems, heavy, frequent drinking among college students can have a variety of negative consequences, including increased chances of missing classes or earning low scores on tests or assignments.

Heavy binge drinking among college students is also associated with assault, sexual violence, and deaths from accidents and injuries.

Unfortunately, the research shows that every year, about 1,500 college students are involved in fatal accidents involving alcohol, including motor vehicle crashes.

Other consequences of binge drinking among college students include health problems, risky sexual behavior, and involvement with police.

Heavy alcohol use may be common and socially promoted on college campuses, but the reality is that it can have devastating effects.

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Binge Drinking Among College Students Can Lead to Addiction

As previously stated, over one-third of college students engage in binge drinking within a given month, placing them at risk of developing an alcohol abuse disorder.

As the National Institutes of Health explains, binge drinking occurs when a college male consumes five or more drinks within a two-hour period, or when a female consumes four or more drinks within the same time period.
Unfortunately, college students may not realize they are drinking in this way, because large portions of beer or mixed drinks consumed during college parties could actually exceed what is considered a single drink. This makes it easy for college students to lose track of the number of drinks consumed, resulting in high rates of binge drinking among college students.

What is even riskier is the fact that some college students drink twice the amount that is considered binge drinking, a pattern that experts call “high intensity drinking.” Over time, this can lead to an alcohol addiction or an alcohol use disorder. According to the latest research, nearly 10% of college students meet the diagnostic criteria for an alcohol use disorder within a given year.

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Signs of an Alcohol Use Disorder

Signs of an alcohol use disorder include being unable to cut back on drinking, giving up other activities in favor of alcohol use, or drinking larger quantities than intended. Other signs of an alcohol use disorder can include drinking in situations in which it is dangerous, continuing to drink despite relationship problems, and drinking to the extent that it is difficult to fulfill duties at work or school.

A college student who is struggling with an alcohol addiction may ruin friendships because of alcohol abuse, involve themselves in dangerous situations, such as drunk driving, and begin to fail classes because drinking interferes with studying and completing schoolwork.

Treatment for Binge Drinking Among College Students

If you are a college student who has become involved in drinking to excess on a regular basis, you may benefit from alcohol rehab. Excessive bouts of focused drinking among college students can lead to an alcohol use disorder, which is a brain disorder that negatively affects numerous areas of life.

Fortunately, treatment can help you to identify your triggers for alcohol abuse and develop strategies for living a life that is free from the grips of alcohol addiction. Experts recommend behavioral interventions and cognitive-behavioral treatments to address binge drinking among college students.
When you seek rehab for alcohol abuse, an addiction professional may provide a specific type of counseling called cognitive behavioral therapy, which can help you to think differently about alcohol and cope with situations that may trigger you to abuse alcohol in the future.

 

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Treatment for Mental Illness and Binge Drinking Among College Students

Excessive drinking among college students is linked to poor mental health, and it can even increase the risk of suicide. One study, published in Issues in Mental Health Nursing, found that college students who were heavy drinkers scored significantly higher on a depression scale when compared to those who did not have drinking problems.
Alcohol abuse can worsen mental health among college students, leading to depression and even suicidal thoughts. Many college students who seek treatment for alcohol abuse may also be in need of mental health care to address mental health conditions like depression.
To ensure the best treatment outcomes, college students with both an alcohol addiction and depression should seek treatment at a dual diagnosis center, which can address both conditions. For example, if you get treatment for alcohol abuse but ignore the underlying depression, you may return to drinking in order to help you cope with mental health symptoms.

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Dual Diagnosis Treatment in Colorado and Arizona

If you are struggling with binge drinking and are in need of rehab, Pathfinders Recovery Center has facilities in both Colorado and Arizona, and we are happy to provide services to those in surrounding states.
We offer dual diagnosis treatment, so we can help with both alcohol addiction and mental health concerns. Our leadership team has over 25 years of experience in the addiction field, and we are proud to offer premier dual diagnosis rehab services.
We also have a range of treatment levels, including inpatient, partial hospitalization, detox, and outpatient services.

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Paying for Dual Diagnosis Treatment

As a college student, you may worry about covering the costs of treatment for alcohol abuse and mental health concerns.

At Pathfinders Recovery Center, we take some of the stress out of the process for you by offering a free insurance verification program.

Simply visit our website and provide us with your insurance information, and a member of our team will tell you what you can expect to pay for treatment.

If you are without insurance coverage, we will work with you to create a cash payment plan.

Call us today to discuss your options and begin your treatment journey, so you can move forward from the consequences of binge drinking among college students.

Painkiller Addiction Among Suburban Housewives

Illustration of woman trapped in pill bottle, to show painkiller addiction

Painkiller Addiction Among Suburban Housewives May Be On the Rise

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2 million Americans began abusing prescription painkillers in 2017, which means painkiller addiction among suburban housewives may be on the rise.

Prescription painkillers like Vicodin and Percocet are safe for treating short-term pain, but people may abuse them because they are highly addictive and can make a person feel very relaxed.

Women may be especially vulnerable to the effects of prescription pills used to treat pain because research shows that women are more sensitive to pain than men are, and they are at a greater risk of prescription painkiller abuse.

This means that a woman who is prescribed opiates following surgery or to treat a chronic pain condition can find herself becoming addicted.

People may think that the abuse of prescription pills only occurs in poor, urban areas, but the reality is that painkiller addiction among suburban housewives is a real concern.

Painkiller abuse is widespread and can affect anyone.

Close-up of a woman's mouth opening to accept a spoonful of pills, to illustrate painkiller addiction

How Painkiller Addictions Develops

Suburban housewives may begin taking prescription pills for legitimate reasons, such as to treat pain following a surgery or injury, but painkiller addictions develop because of the properties of prescription painkillers.

Per the National Institute on Drug Abuse, prescription painkillers have a relaxing effect and can make a person feel high, which can lead some people to abuse them.

Painkiller addiction may develop when a person takes larger doses than a doctor prescribes, or when they use prescription pills to get high.

It is also important to understand that prescription painkillers increase the levels of a brain chemical called dopamine, which has a rewarding effect.

Over time, people may also develop a tolerance for prescription pills, meaning they will need larger doses of pills to experience the same effects.

This can cause women to seek out more prescription pills, ultimately leading to painkiller addiction.

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The Dangers of Painkiller Addiction and Abuse

Some people may think that painkiller addiction is not a serious concern since painkillers are prescription pills with legitimate medical uses, but this could not be further from the truth. The National Institute on Drug Abuse warns of the negative effects of painkiller abuse, which can include drowsiness, constipation, confusion, and nausea.
In large doses, prescription painkillers can cause slowed breathing and even cut off the supply of oxygen to the brain. This can cause serious complications, such as brain damage, coma, and even death.
Another consequence of abusing prescription pills is the development of a painkiller addiction, which often requires drug rehab.

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Signs of Painkiller Addiction

When a woman develops a painkiller addiction, an addiction treatment professional will diagnose a substance use disorder, which is the clinical term for an addiction. Symptoms of a substance use disorder, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, include strong drug cravings, being unable to reduce drug use, and using larger amounts of drugs than intended.
Other symptoms can include using drugs even when it causes health problems, continuing to use prescription pills despite trouble fulfilling duties at work, home, or school, and giving up other activities in favor of drug use.
Suburban housewives who find that they are forgoing parenting and household duties or giving up leisure time activities because of drug use, or who are finding that they cannot stop using prescription pills, may have developed a painkiller addiction, even if a doctor is prescribing the medication.

Painkiller Addiction and Withdrawal

Withdrawal is one of the reasons that drug rehab is often necessary for women who struggle with painkiller addiction. Painkiller withdrawal occurs because over time, the body becomes physically dependent upon prescription pills. Once a person stops using these drugs, the body has to adapt and therefore experiences withdrawal symptoms.
Prescription painkiller withdrawal can be extremely unpleasant, making it difficult for a person to stop using these drugs. For example, a woman who is a suffering from painkiller addiction may experience sleep disturbances, goose bumps, cold sweats, involuntary leg movements, diarrhea, vomiting, and pain in the muscles and bones when withdrawing from prescription painkillers.
A drug rehab can offer a detox program, where medical staff provide care, support, and supervision to women as their bodies rid themselves of drugs. This can keep them as safe and as comfortable as possible as they go through withdrawal from prescription pills.

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Treatment for Prescription Painkiller Addiction

Since prescription painkillers are so addictive and can lead to uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms, it is often difficult for women to stop using these pills without going to drug rehab.
If you have been struggling with addiction to prescription pills, a drug rehab program will often begin your treatment plan with a stay in detox to help you through the withdrawal process. According to experts, a doctor working in a drug rehab program may prescribe medications like methadone or buprenorphine to help with drug cravings and withdrawal symptoms as you detox from prescription painkillers.
After completing detox, it is important to continue your drug rehab journey with an ongoing program that includes behavioral treatments like counseling. A type of counseling like cognitive behavioral therapy can help you to cope with triggers and stress that might lead to drug use and teach you healthier ways of thinking about drugs.
A combination of medication and counseling is usually the best approach for treating addiction, so you may continue to take a medication like buprenorphine or methadone while engaged in ongoing drug rehab.

Woman holds up a opioid pill she's taking with a worried look, to demonstrate painkiller addiction

Drug Rehab for Painkiller Addiction in Colorado and Arizona

If you are struggling with painkiller addiction, and you are ready to seek drug rehab, Pathfinders Recovery Center has locations in Colorado and Arizona. We are also happy to accept patients from surrounding areas.
Pathfinders offers various levels of treatment, including residential, partial hospitalization, and outpatient. We also offer a detox program. If you are living with a painkiller addiction, your treatment journey with us will likely begin with detox, so you can be safe and comfortable while your body goes through withdrawal from prescription pills.
After you complete detox, our team will help you to determine the best type of treatment for your specific situation. We are a premier drug rehab center, and our leadership team has over 25 years of experience in the addiction field, so you can be confident that you are getting the best care possible for your painkiller addiction.
We are also considered a dual diagnosis treatment center, meaning we can treat both addiction and mental illness.

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Paying for Drug Rehab

Once you have decided it is time to go to drug rehab for prescription pills, you have to determine how you will pay for treatment.

At Pathfinders Recovery Center, we offer an online insurance verification program so you can find out how much it will cost you to attend treatment.

Simply fill out a form on our website, and a member of our team will contact you to tell you what your insurance covers and how much you can expect to pay out-of-pocket.

We can also create a cash payment plan if you do not plan to pay for treatment with insurance.

Contact us today to begin your journey toward sobriety.

How Long Do Drugs Stay in Your System

A gloved hand dips a test strip into urine, to show 'Close-up of drug testing form, to indicate answers to 'How Long Do Drugs Stay in Your System'

If you are undergoing a drug test, you are likely wondering, “How long do drugs stay in your system?”

The answer to this question varies depending upon the type of drug.

For example, as the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has explained, drugs stay in your system for different amounts of time based upon their chemical properties, such as the drug’s half-life.

Some drugs may be eliminated from the body more quickly than others.

In addition to variations depending on the type of drug, there are also other factors, such as your personal health and the type of testing used.

 

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How Long Do Drugs Stay In Your Urine?

Since urine testing is a common form of drug screening, people often want to know “How long do drugs stay in your urine?”

Again, this can vary depending on the type of substance, but the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration states that most drugs stay in urine for two to four days.

That being said, how long drugs stay in your urine is also dependent upon how long you have been using and how high of a dose you typically use.

Higher doses and more frequent drug use can be detected in urine for longer periods of time, because ongoing drug use causes drugs to build up in the body.

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How Long Do Drugs Stay in Your Urine?: Variations Based on Drug Type

As previously stated with urine testing, how long drugs stay in your system depends upon the type of drug you have been using.
Per the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, cocaine is eliminated from the system pretty quickly, so if you use the drug one time, a urine test will only detect within one day. On the other hand, if you have been using cocaine on a daily basis, it will probably stay in your system for two to three days.
Marijuana tends to stay in your system a little longer, especially if you are a chronic user. With occasional use, marijuana will likely be cleared from your system within three days, but if you are a daily user, it can take five to 10 days for it to leave your body. Furthermore, if you are a chronic marijuana user, it can be detected in your urine for up to a month.
How long do drugs stay in your urine is also applicable to benzodiazepines, a type of prescription drug that people abuse for their sedative effects. With a prescribed dose, these drugs are eliminated from the body in three to seven days, but with chronic use, it can take a month for benzodiazepines to leave your system.
According to a how long do drugs stay in your system chart from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, methamphetamine stays in urine for two to four days; opiates are eliminated in one to three days, and ecstasy is detectable in urine for one to five days

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How Long Do Drugs Stay in Your System Using Other Methods?

Urine testing is not the only method for determining how long do drugs stay in your system. Some people also wonder “How long do drugs stay in your saliva?” As the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has explained, saliva testing can only detect very recent drug use. Most drugs can only be detected in saliva for 12 to 24 hours after you use them, but marijuana may only be detected in saliva for four to 10 hours after the last use.
Another method for testing for drugs is hair testing. This method is less popular but can detect drugs that have been used in the past four months; however, it can take up to a week after drug use for hair follicles to absorb drugs.

Recap: How Long Do Drugs Stay in Your System?

The answer to the question, “How long do drugs stay in your system?” varies depending upon the type of drug you use, how long you have been using, and what method is used to detect drug use.
For instance, marijuana and benzodiazepines may remain in the system via a urine screen for longer than cocaine, especially with long-term use. In general, drugs will stay in the urine for two to four days and in the saliva for up to one day. Hair testing can detect drug use over several months.
While these are general estimates of how long drugs stay in your system, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration explains that other factors, such as your general health, metabolism, exercise habits, fluid intake, diet, gender, and exercise habits can affect how long drugs stay in your urine.

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Seeking Treatment For Drug Addiction

If you are asking, “How long do drugs stay in your system?,” chances are that you have been struggling with drug use and might be worried that a positive drug test will get you in trouble or cause you to lose your job. If this is the case, you may have developed an addiction.
According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the clinical term for a drug addiction is a substance use disorder. Symptoms of a substance use disorder include strong drug cravings, being unable to cut back on drug use, and continuing to use drugs despite serious consequences, such as health problems or difficulty fulfilling duties at work or home.
If you have developed a substance use disorder, you will likely need drug rehab to help you stop using. As experts explain, drug rehab can involve behavioral treatments like therapy in addition to medications that treat addiction.

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Drug Rehab in Colorado and Arizona

Once you realize that you need help for drug addiction, it is time to reach out to a drug rehab center. If you are looking for rehab in Colorado or Arizona, Pathfinders Recovery Center has facilities in both states, and we are happy to provide treatment to patients from surrounding areas.
We are a premier dual diagnosis treatment center, meaning we are qualified to treat both addiction and mental illness. Our leadership team has over 25 years of experience, and we offer various levels of treatment, including detox, residential, partial hospitalization, and outpatient.

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Paying for Drug Rehab

You may be worried about covering the costs of drug rehab, even if you know seeking treatment is the best choice.

Pathfinders can take some of the stress out of the equation for you by offering a free insurance verification program.

By filling out a quick form on our website, you can learn how much of your treatment your insurance plan will cover, as well as what you can expect to pay out of pocket.

Even if you do not have insurance, Pathfinders can work with you to develop a cash payment plan.

Reach out to us today to determine how we can help you to recover from drug addiction and abuse.